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Russian Moves Raise Stakes In Ukraine Conflict

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Russian Moves Raise Stakes In Ukraine Conflict

Post by Mazy on Fri Feb 28 2014, 03:45

Russian Moves Raise Stakes In Ukraine Conflict
Feb 27th 2014 4:43PM
Ukraine Protests

Anti-Yanukovych protesters stand outside the Ukrainian parliament in central Kiev, Thursday, Feb. 27, 2014. Ukraine put its police on high alert after dozens of armed pro-Russia men stormed and seized local government buildings in Ukraine's Crimea region early Thursday and raised a Russian flag over a barricade. (AP Photo/Marko Drobnjakovic)

SIMFEROPOL, Ukraine (AP) - Masked gunmen stormed parliament in Ukraine's strategic Crimea region Thursday as Russian fighter jets scrambled to patrol borders, while the newly formed government pledged to prevent a national breakup with strong backing from the West - the stirrings of a potentially dangerous confrontation reminiscent of Cold War brinksmanship.

Moscow granted shelter to Ukraine's fugitive president, Viktor Yanukovych, state media said. He was said to be holed up in a luxury government retreat and to have scheduled a news conference Friday near the Ukrainian border.

As gunmen wearing unmarked camouflage uniforms erected a sign reading "Crimea is Russia" in the provincial capital, Ukraine's interim prime minister declared the Black Sea territory "has been and will be a part of Ukraine."

The escalating conflict sent Ukraine's finances plummeting further, prompting Western leaders to prepare an emergency financial package.

Yanukovych, whose abandonment of closer ties to Europe in favor of a bailout loan from Russia set off three months of protests, finally fled by helicopter last week as his allies deserted him. The humiliating exit was a severe blow to Russian President Vladimir Putin, who had been celebrating his signature Olympics even as Ukraine's drama came to a head. The Russian leader has long dreamed of pulling Ukraine - a country of 46 million people considered the cradle of Russian civilization - closer into Moscow's orbit.

For Ukraine's neighbors, the specter of Ukraine breaking up evoked memories of centuries of bloody conflict.

"Regional conflicts begin this way," said Polish Foreign Minister Radoslaw Sikorski, calling the confrontation "a very dangerous game."

Russia has pledged to respect Ukraine's territorial integrity. But the dispatch of Russian fighter jets Thursday to patrol borders and drills by some 150,000 Russian troops - almost the entirety of its force in the western part of the country - signaled strong determination not to lose Ukraine to the West.

Thursday's dramatic developments posed an immediate challenge to Ukraine's new authorities as they named an interim government for the country, whose population is divided in loyalties between Russia and the West. Crimea, which was seized by Russian forces in the 18th century under Catherine the Great, was once the crown jewel in Russian and then Soviet empires.

It only became part of Ukraine in 1954 when Soviet leader Nikita Khrushchev transferred jurisdiction from Russia - a move that was a mere formality until the 1991 Soviet collapse meant Crimea landed in an independent Ukraine.

In the capital, Kiev, the new prime minister said Ukraine's future lies in the European Union, but with friendly relations with Russia.

Arseniy Yatsenyuk, named Thursday in a boisterous parliamentary session, now faces the difficult task of restoring stability in a country that is not only deeply divided politically but on the verge of financial collapse. The 39-year-old served as economy minister, foreign minister and parliamentary speaker before Yanukovych took office in 2010, and is widely viewed as a technocratic reformer who enjoys the support of the U.S.

Shortly before the lawmakers chose him, Yatsenyuk insisted the country wouldn't accept the secession of Crimea. The Black Sea territory, he declared, "has been and will be a part of Ukraine."

In Simferopol, the Crimean regional capital, gunmen toting rocket-propelled grenades and sniper rifles raised the Russian flag over the local parliament building. They wore black and orange ribbons, a Russian symbol of victory in World War II.

Oleksandr Turchynov, who stepped in as acting president after Yanukovych's flight, condemned the assault as a "crime against the government of Ukraine." He warned that any move by Russian troops off of their base in Crimea "will be considered a military aggression."

"I have given orders to the military to use all methods necessary to protect the citizens, punish the criminals, and to free the buildings," he said.

Experts described a delicate situation in which one sudden move could lead to wider conflict.

"The main concern at this point is that Kiev might decide to intervene by sending law enforcement people to restore constitutional order," said Dmitry Trenin, head of the Carnegie Moscow Center. "That is something that would lead to confrontation and drag the Russians in."

In a bid to shore up Ukraine's fledgling administration, the International Monetary Fund said it was "ready to respond" to Ukraine's bid for financial assistance. The European Union is also considering emergency loans for a country that is the chief conduit of Russian natural gas to western Europe.

IMF chief Christine Lagarde said in the organization's first official statement on Ukraine's crisis that it was in talks with its partners on "how best to help Ukraine at this critical moment in its history." Ukraine's finance ministry has said it needs $35 billion over the next two years to avoid default. Ukraine's currency, the hryvnia, dropped to a new record low of 11.25 to the U.S. dollar, a sign of the country's financial distress.

Western leaders lined up to support the new Ukrainian leadership, with the German and British leaders warning Russia not to interfere.

"Every country should respect the territorial integrity and sovereignty of the Ukraine," British Prime Minister David Cameron said after a meeting with German Chancellor Angela Merkel in London.

NATO defense ministers met in Brussels, and U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel emerged appealing for calm.

"These are difficult times," he said, "but these are times for cool, wise leadership on Russia's side and everyone's side."

Yet the prospect of the West luring Ukraine into NATO is the very nightmare that Russia is desperately trying to avoid. Trenin of the Carnegie Center said a Ukraine-NATO courtship "would really raise the alarm levels in Moscow."

Yanukovych declared Thursday in a statement that he remains Ukraine's legitimate president. He was reportedly to hold a news conference Friday in the southern Russian city of Rostov-on-Don, not far from the Ukrainian border. A respected Russian news organization said the fugitive leader was staying at the Kremlin-run Barvikha retreat just outside Moscow, though spokesmen for Putin and for the department that runs the resort told The Associated Press they had no information about Yanukovych's whereabouts.

"I have to ask Russia to ensure my personal safety from extremists," Yanukovych's statement read, according to Russian news agencies. Shortly after, an unnamed Russian official was quoted as saying that Yanukovych's request had been granted.

Yanukovych fled after riot police attacked protesters in Kiev's central square in clashes that killed more than 80 people, and European and Russian officials intervened. He has not been seen publicly since Saturday, when he insisted he remained the legitimately elected president - a position backed by Russia. Legal experts say his flight and the appointment of a new government make that stance moot.

On Thursday, the White House said Yanukovych "abdicated his responsibility" and welcomed the Ukrainian parliament's efforts to stabilize the country.

The Russian Foreign Ministry voiced concern about the Russian-speaking population in Ukraine and vowed to protect their interests. Putin on Thursday asked the government to consider providing humanitarian assistance to Crimea.

State-owned ITAR-Tass news agency quoted a statement read at a session of the ministry's board on Thursday, saying that Russia "will have a firm and uncompromising response to violations of the rights of compatriots by foreign states."

In Crimea's capital, a pro-Russian activist who gave only his first name, Maxim, said he and other activists were camped overnight outside the parliament in Simferopol when about 50 men wearing flak jackets and carrying rocket-propelled grenade launchers and sniper rifles took over the building.

"Our activists were sitting there all night calmly, building the barricades," he said. "At 5 o'clock unknown men turned up and went to the building. They got into the courtyard and put everyone on the ground."

"They were asking who we were. When we said we stand for the Russian language and Russia, they said: 'Don't be afraid. We're with you.' Then they began to storm the building bringing down the doors," he said. "They didn't look like volunteers or amateurs; they were professionals. This was clearly a well-organized operation."
"Who are they?" he added. "Nobody knows."

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Mazy
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Re: Russian Moves Raise Stakes In Ukraine Conflict

Post by Carla97 on Thu Mar 06 2014, 09:58

"In the capital, Kiev, the new prime minister said Ukraine's future lies in the European Union, but with friendly relations with Russia."

Hmmm.

Once more pointless whatabouterry from Carla.

Today EU has emergency meeting over Ukraine crises and what sanctions to implement. Maybe somewhere between foie gras and chocolate mousse they´ll realize everything is interconnected and interdependent. Impossible to damage Russia economically without damaging yourself. Some EU countries export up to 20-40% to Russia. They have factories, business and bank accounts there.

The world is watching Crimea and Kiev. Good, but
always but
Putin gave a press conference day before yesterday. There was something on his ramblings that has been overlooked so far, everyone is so focused on Crimea and Kiev.

He said: The new coalition has appointed "a unique crook" as a mayor/governor of eastern ukraine. His name is Kolomoisky. What makes him so unique? According to Putin he deceived his friend Roman Abramovich. Roman is owner of Chelsea F.C., lived in London, but moved back to Moscow and married a daughter of Zhukov. Zhukov is arm dealer who was caught by Italians and sent to prison there for illegal, massive arm dealing to Balkan. So Roman "lent" Kolomoisky several billion dollars and he simply pocketed the money.

Sounds like fiction, but is real. And he gave it some considerable weight in his speech. Unfortunately it can have an impact on the situation in Ukraine. Putin is known for "taking care of russian citizens" for the matter. Couple of years ago one russian got in trouple with swiss authorities. Result was, Putin banned Swissair from Russian airspace. Also subsidiary, Lufthansa was not allowed to fly there.

So that´s it, I´m off for weekend trip  sunny 

Have a good one everyone  cheers 

Carla97
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Re: Russian Moves Raise Stakes In Ukraine Conflict

Post by Mazy on Thu Mar 06 2014, 12:44

Thanks Carla for your up-dates I'm getting sooo many in my email alerts I just cannot keep up and which to post.

Mazy
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Re: Russian Moves Raise Stakes In Ukraine Conflict

Post by chiki on Thu Mar 06 2014, 17:34

At the moment, they have frozen the assets of Yanukovich and 17 senior government officials for a year, but nothing about Russia. I'm not expecting too much from UE. Europe receives 30% of gas from Russia, so... that's all!
Meanwhile, Russia goes on with its invasion and Crimea Parliament asks to join Russia.

Enjoy your weekend trip, Carla Wink

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Re: Russian Moves Raise Stakes In Ukraine Conflict

Post by Einstein on Fri Mar 07 2014, 01:03

here is my Facebook side. I have produced the picture of Putin.[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
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Re: Russian Moves Raise Stakes In Ukraine Conflict

Post by Einstein on Fri Mar 07 2014, 01:04

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Re: Russian Moves Raise Stakes In Ukraine Conflict

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