Log in

I forgot my password

Our latest tweets
Free Webmaster ToolsSubmit Express

Now Magazine, March 1999

View previous topic View next topic Go down

Now Magazine, March 1999

Post by Katiedot on Mon Jul 11 2011, 22:22

Now magazine, is a UK women's mag, with lots of gossip. It's not tabloid as such, but not necessarily reliable. They tend to take other interviews and then re-package and re-present them as 'exclusives' in their own mag.

He used to only date actresses, but that was before he met Celine in a Paris restaurant. Most people said it wouldn't last but, three years on, George is more devoted than ever.

George Clooney has spelled out exactly why he's just celebrated his third anniversary with French law student Celine Balitran: she's a home-loving woman who doesn't shop for clothes and couldn't care less about his stardom. 'She didn't even know I was an actor when she agreed to go out with me,' he says proudly. 'My relationship with Celine has made me sure of one thing - I've lost interest in actresses. The fact that I'm now with a totally natural woman, who doesn't care about Hollywood, is one of the best things about our life together.'

George, 37, who lives with 25-year-old Celine at his ranch in Los Angeles, has even chosen to spend more time with her by quitting ER for a career in films and television production. The actor's new company Maysville Picyures (named after Maysville, Kentucky, where he was born) will allow him to work from home and spend more time with Celine.

Viewers on Sky One will witness his final appearances as Dr Doug Ross in a two-part story on 8 and 15 April (it will be shown on Channel 4 in May). He's dismissed in spectacular fashion after he secretly undertakes the mercy killing of a young boy at the request of his parents. When hospital bosses find out, he's forced to resign in disgrace.

'I've been working seven days a week, what with the show and extra movies,' he says. 'Now I'll be down to six and a half days. No, seriously, I'll be able to plan what I do and how much time I spend at work. Celine's an important factor in that decision.'

George is specific on the main attractions of a woman not connected to showbusiness. 'It's important to me that we started off together the right way. When I met her, she was working part-time as a waitress in a restaurant in Paris and I was just another guy coming on to her. 'We went out without me telling her what I did for a living. The TV series wasn't on in France and the films One Fine Day and Peacemaker weren't playing, so no one gave me a second glance.

'She was so natural. We talked about her work as a law student and how she was paying her way by working part-time. In fact, we talked about everything but me, which was great. 'She admitted that she must be one of the few people in Paris who didn't go to the movies. She actually said: "Actors always seem so big-headed," and I thought: "Is she having me on?"'

George insists that Celine, who has recently combined kindergarten teaching in LA with modelling for Christian Dior, didn't know that he was a star until she visited him in America. 'We went out and some people started calling: "Hey George." She turned to me and said: "How do they know your name?" To tell the truth, I was reluctant to say.'

Once married to actress Talia Balsam and a live-in partner of Kelly Preston, now John Travolta's wife, George makes it clear that his days with actresses are over. 'The crazy thing is, it's very difficult for me to meet anyone but actresses,' he says. 'Most of us have partners who are in the same kind of job. I've broken out and am enjoying the experience.

'Celine doesn't need constant reassurance. She spends her days working with children rather than buying clothes. And she doesn't talk constantly about her image and box-office figures.

But he neatly sidesteps the question of whether he will propose marriage or when and if they will have children. 'We've already married about a hundred times and had a family of 10 kids, according to some newspapers.' George's career is at a crossroads following his exit from ER after five years. He's looking at various movie offers and has been writing a new TV comedy series called Kilroy based on his own experiences in Hollywood. 'It's time-consuming and hard work, but I'm having great fun. I'm calling my friends, asking for their individual Hollywood nightmares to add to my own.'

The hero is likely to be a young unknown, yet to be cast, and will face the sort of humiliations and career set-backs that prevented George from becoming a star until his thirties.

His long-term ambition is to bring back live TV drama. He's already tried it with ER and wants to have regular TV slots for such risk-taking. Next, though, he's back on the big screen in World War II film The Thin Red Line, which opens this week.

And he might return to ER. 'I wanted an exit that allowed me to return from time to time,' he says. 'It was a great moment when one of the producers said: "We've decided to let you live." Anything is possible in the future. I should know better, of course, but I'm feeling very optimistic. And I get to stay at home a little more. I hope Celine will appreciate it...'

Garth Pearce: Now magazine (11 March, 1999)


Posts : 12369
Join date : 2010-12-05

Back to top Go down

Re: Now Magazine, March 1999

Post by melbert on Tue Jul 12 2011, 01:52

A few little inaccuracies, but a fun read anyway. How long after this article did they split? Curious hunh?

George Clooney fan forever!

Posts : 19115
Join date : 2010-12-06
Location : George's House

Back to top Go down

Re: Now Magazine, March 1999

Post by lucy on Tue Jul 12 2011, 04:15

He seems so different during this time of his life, the price of fame.Makes me wish I was a fan during this time.

Clooney Zen Master

Posts : 3209
Join date : 2010-12-10

Back to top Go down

Re: Now Magazine, March 1999

Post by Sponsored content Today at 14:14

Sponsored content

Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top

Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum