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The Serious Side - part 2

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Wed 17 Jan 2018, 06:40

So this man is married to an American and has American kids.
His only crime is that a relative brought him to the States when he was ten - something he can't be blamed for.
He worked, paid taxes (at least I assume this) and has never done any financial damage to the States, except of going to school as a child (I guess).
Tried to become a US citizen since 2005 but failed. WHY? I mean, how is it possible that, despite of all the facts, the government can deny this?

It's not easy to become a German citizen (we don't have the ius soli ('right of the soil') but the ius sanguinis ('right of the blood') which means that your nationality is based on your parents' nationality. Maybe changing this right would make it easier for the States to control immigration because it doesn't offer such an incentive for your descendants.
But an alien who's parent of a German child (because the other parent is German), will not be deported because the family has the right to live together or at least see each other regularly.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Wed 17 Jan 2018, 15:52

Carolhathaway - I don't understand any of this. It has always been my understanding that if you were married to an American citizen you were able to live here. I thought you were automatically granted citizenship, but maybe you only got a green card or visa. Whatever, I thought being the spouse of an American citizen allowed you to stay.

I only wish Trump's disgusting immigration policies could be retroactive and applied to his family. His white-slaver grandfather could have been kicked out for being an "undesirable alien" for opening a brothel. Even back then it was illegal and criminal activity could get you deported. Of course they would have sent him back to Germany and this putrid family would be your problem instead of ours. I guess you got lucky.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Wed 17 Jan 2018, 16:12

LizzyNY wrote:His white-slaver grandfather could have been kicked out for being an "undesirable alien" for opening a brothel. Even back then it was illegal and criminal activity could get you deported. Of course they would have sent him back to Germany and this putrid family would be your problem instead of ours. I guess you got lucky.
We are lucky that you got him, but maybe he was a totally different person if brought up in Germany. Although - if his father was like him - his father had been a nazi and strong Hitler supporter (at least that's my assumption, based on the fact that I know lots of people from my parents' and grandparents' generation who were members of the SS which means they weren't just 'ordinary followers' but real believers of the idealogy).
So I guess he'd be worse...
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Wed 17 Jan 2018, 16:21

LizzyNY wrote:Carolhathaway - I don't understand any of this. It has always been my understanding that if you were married to an American citizen you were able to live here. I thought you were automatically granted citizenship, but maybe you only got a green card or visa. Whatever, I thought being the spouse of an American citizen allowed you to stay.

What's disturbing me most is how many people seem to agree with Trump's immigration politics. I found a retweet on Lysa Heslov's twitter account and went to the original post. The comments were unbelievable (well, not all of them). They see this man as a criminal who deserves no redemption because he was brought to the States as a child! What about death penalty for illegal immigrants? They are worse than murderers! (That's my stretch, but a lot of people seem to have forgotten that their ancestors had come to the States as well, many of them illegally.)

I wish all of them, dreamers and illegals, would go on strike for three days - all at the same time to show your country that you rely on them...
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Donnamarie on Wed 17 Jan 2018, 18:09

This is such a sad story.  It didn’t have to turn out this way.  ICE could have made an exception for this man and shown a compassionate effort to work with his family to allow him to stay.  I’m completely baffled myself how a law abiding man that this man seems to be, and brought to this country as a child, would be so cruelly treated by law enforcement in our country.  This is shameful.  But I was reading comments about this in a ‘Washington Post’ article and I was really stunned by how many people were saying good riddance to this man.  He broke the law (which he really didn’t) and that’s what happens.  He’s not a citizen, many said, so he doesn’t deserve to be here.  There is a real coarseness and meanness running through a segment of our population. Trump is definitely appealing to these people.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Thu 18 Jan 2018, 11:06

Two very interesting stories here.......

https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2018/jan/18/simona-mangiante-trump-russia-joseph-mifsud-george-papadopoulos

http://www.newsweek.com/jared-kushner-without-security-clearance-after-one-year-white-house-783965

oops, no. Three

http://www.newsweek.com/jared-kushners-high-school-making-children-write-letters-support-donald-trump-783538

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Way2Old4Dis on Thu 18 Jan 2018, 15:40

Donnamarie wrote:PAN, a friend of mine has a theory that along with the Democratic National Committee, the Republican National Committee was also hacked by the Russians.  My friend thinks that Russia has incriminating info on the Republicans and that’s part of the reason why they are enabling Trump.  I have to say I don’t buy it.  But the media asks this question every day.  Yea, we know that the Republicans have to please their base constituency (and they all voted for Trump) but we’ve crossed a line now.  We’re talking fitness for office, danger to our country, character, morals and values.  And yet these fools fall in line time and time again.  The ones who do speak out against Trump are the same basically moderate Republicans who will not be running for re-election.

Actually, I don't think your friend is far off the mark. The Russians' MO is to cover all bases. They don't have friends; they have tools. They almost certainly have 'compromising material' on many Republicans. I also think they (Putin/Russia) laundered money through several GOP-leaning organizations, including the NRA, to tRump's campaign and the RNC. This may be the reason we are seeing so many GOP legislators deciding not to seek re-election, or giving up committee memberships. There is likely a paper trail that the special prosecutor investigation has turned up, and these criminals know they will be implicated.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by fava on Thu 18 Jan 2018, 16:25

Way2Old4Dis wrote:
Donnamarie wrote:PAN, a friend of mine has a theory that along with the Democratic National Committee, the Republican National Committee was also hacked by the Russians.  My friend thinks that Russia has incriminating info on the Republicans and that’s part of the reason why they are enabling Trump.  I have to say I don’t buy it.  But the media asks this question every day.  Yea, we know that the Republicans have to please their base constituency (and they all voted for Trump) but we’ve crossed a line now.  We’re talking fitness for office, danger to our country, character, morals and values.  And yet these fools fall in line time and time again.  The ones who do speak out against Trump are the same basically moderate Republicans who will not be running for re-election.

Actually, I don't think your friend is far off the mark. The Russians' MO is to cover all bases. They don't have friends; they have tools. They almost certainly have 'compromising material' on many Republicans. I also think they (Putin/Russia) laundered money through several GOP-leaning organizations, including the NRA, to tRump's campaign and the RNC. This may be the reason we are seeing so many GOP legislators deciding not to seek re-election, or giving up committee memberships. There is likely a paper trail that the special prosecutor investigation has turned up, and these criminals know they will be implicated.
Yes!  Articles in the last 24 hours about Russian money potentially funneled through the NRA.  I don't know much about the spying/compromising game, but it's amazing how many points of contact and pressure that the Russians utilized.  Obviously very intricately and carefully planned and executed.  Also assisted by the greed of Trump and his family/cronies.  Kushner a sitting duck with his financial liabilities.

Trump is no surprise to me.  Somewhat surprised at how hypocritical and spineless some congressional republicans are and how easily their "principles" are discarded.  May be the death of their party-- and deservedly so.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Thu 18 Jan 2018, 16:58

And here are some of those articles about the FBI now investigating the NRA:

http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/01/the-nra-is-part-of-the-trumprussia-scandal-now.html

http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/a15384608/fbi-nra-russia-money-trump/

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Thu 18 Jan 2018, 17:18

Eric Trump says his father is not a racist. He doesn't see black or white. "The only color he sees is green." That explains a lot.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Way2Old4Dis on Thu 18 Jan 2018, 20:35

Thanks, PA-N and fava. I hadn't seen those; was just commenting on conclusions from old readings. I can run through these now, since I'm in the house for the day.

Looks like lots of strings being woven together.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Donnamarie on Fri 19 Jan 2018, 04:20

Just heard about this tonight.  Rachel Maddow interviewed one of the McClatchy reporters who broke the NRA story.  Well maybe my friend was more right than not.  We shall see.   If that’s the case I wonder if Mueller’s team is already on top of this?  And you have to wonder how aggressive the Republican Congress will get to try and shut down the Mueller investigation.  Some of them have been planting seeds for a while now.

I agree fava.  If there are culpable Republicans involved in this huge cover-up that would pretty much end the Republican Party as we know it.  It is mind boggling and scary to find out just how much Russia has insinuated itself into the fabric of our country.

What was equally stunning today was reading excerpts from Glenn Simpson’s congressional testimony, especially the Russian money laundering connections to Trump’s golf courses and condos.  Seems like there are many dirty hands ....
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Fri 19 Jan 2018, 10:57

This stuff is pretty damning - and that's an understatement.

http://uk.businessinsider.com/read-fusion-gps-glenn-simpson-interview-with-house-intelligence-committee-2018-1?r=US&IR=T


This guy has been following the money from Putin, the Russian Mafia, oligarchs who are also the Russian mafia (more 'efficient' than the Italian mafia apparently),   Trump Towers from Panama to NYC and all points north south east and west.

The golf clubs are all shells for other stuff apparently

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Fri 19 Jan 2018, 13:34

PAN,
that's really heavy stuff!

By the way: The Deutsche Bank announced  'suspicious financial business transactions' by Jared Kushner and / or related companies / persons. The German Department of Banking and Financial Supervising will now analyze it.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Sat 20 Jan 2018, 13:43

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5291875/Trump-says-Democrats-illegal-immigrants-first.html

[size=34]'They gave me a nice present': Trump says 'obstructionist' Schumer would rather play 'Shutdown Politics' after the country is plunged in to a crippling federal freeze but the Democrats blame a 'chaotic' president[/size]

  • President Donald Trump blamed Democrats early Saturday morning for the shutdown of the federal government 

  • 'Democrats are far more concerned with Illegal Immigrants than they are with our great Military or Safety at our dangerous Southern Border,' Trump tweeted

  • The Democrats accused Trump of reneging on a deal that they say he agreed to with Senator Charles Schumer of New York at the White House earlier Friday

  • Schumer he tried to bring border wall to the table in exchange for DACA protections and shutdown is completely Trump's fault 

  • Senate Republicans fail to attract 60 votes to prevent government shutdown 

  • Five Democrats who represent red states voted with Republicans in Friday's vote

  • GOP lost four senators who wouldn't vote for the Trump-backed bill 

  • Press Secretary Sarah Sanders tweeted that Democrats voted against the bill to undermine Trump's new tax law 

  • White House called Democrats 'obstructionist losers' in an official statement after the vote

  • Pence also scorched the Democrats in a statement, saying they are causing 'brave men and women in uniform' to stand their post without pay 

  • McConnell called the shutdown 'completely avoidable,' said Dems held the vote 'hostage' 


By ARIEL ZILBER FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 07:31 EST, 20 January 2018 | UPDATED: 08:33 EST, 20 January 2018

    



President Donald Trump blamed Democrats early Saturday morning for the shutdown of the federal government, accusing the opposition party of putting 'illegal immigrants' ahead of the country.
'Democrats are far more concerned with Illegal Immigrants than they are with our great Military or Safety at our dangerous Southern Border,' the president tweeted just after dawn Eastern time on Saturday. 
The House of Representatives will convene for a meeting at 9am, while the Senate will hold talks at noon on Saturday in an effort to end the crisis, The Washington Postreported. 
'They could have easily made a deal but decided to play Shutdown politics instead.

'#WeNeedMoreRepublicansIn18 in order to power through mess!'
Trump then tweeted: 'This is the One Year Anniversary of my Presidency and the Democrats wanted to give me a nice present.' 


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The president then used the hashtag #DemocratShutdown.
'For those asking, the Republicans only have 51 votes in the Senate, and they need 60,' Trump said in a follow-up tweet. 
'That is why we need to win more Republicans in 2018 Election! We can then be even tougher on Crime (and Border), and even better to our Military & Veterans!'
Finally, Trump tweeted: '#America First!' 
Democratic Senator Charles Schumer of New York, the Minority Leader, said early Saturday that he had agreed to discuss Trump's proposal for a wall along the US-Mexico border as part of an overall deal that would include protections for the children of undocumented immigrants.
'During the meeting, in exchange for strong [Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals] protections, I reluctantly put the border wall on the table for the discussion. Even that was not enough to entice the president to finish the deal,' Schumer said from the Senate floor. 

Schumer said that he and Trump met at the White House earlier on Friday and had a 'lengthy and substantive discussion'.
The two men had discussed a potential deal while eating cheeseburgers in the White House dining hall, according to The New York Times. 
The New York senator said he believed Trump was committed to a deal.
'In my heart, I thought we might have a deal tonight,' Schumer said.
'That was how far we had come. That's how positive our discussion felt. We had a good meeting.'
The Democrats say it was Trump who backed away from a deal after coming to an agreement with Schumer. 
'There was virtually a deal, a comprehensive agreement, between Chuck Schumer and the president, and he walked away from it after he talked to his hard right,' Senator Richard Blumenthal, a Democrat from Connecticut, told The Hill.


[size=34]GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: WHAT'S CLOSED? WHO IS AFFECTED?[/size]


The federal government shutdown only partially curbs operations. But the longer the shutdown continues, the more likely its impact will be felt.
U.S. troops will stay at their posts and mail will get delivered, but almost half of the 2 million civilian federal workers will be barred from doing their jobs if the shutdown extends into Monday.
How key parts of the federal government would be affected by a shutdown:

[size=16]
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A general view of The United States Capitol is seen in Washington Friday as the shutdown begins

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE
A shutdown plan posted on the Treasury Department's website shows that nearly 44 percent of the IRS' 80,565 employees will be exempt from being furloughed during a shutdown. That would mean nearly 45,500 IRS employees will be sent home just as the agency is preparing for the start of the tax filing season and ingesting the sweeping changes made by the new GOP tax law.
The Republican architects of the tax law have promised that millions of working Americans will see heftier paychecks next month, with less money withheld by employers in anticipation of lower income taxes. The IRS recently issued new withholding tables for employers.
But Marcus Owens, who for 10 years headed the IRS division dealing with charities and political organizations, said it's a 'virtual certainty' that the larger paychecks will be delayed if there's a lengthy government shutdown.
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT
Half of the more than 80,000 employees will be sent home. Key programs will continue to function because their funding has ongoing authorization and doesn't depend on annual approval by Congress. But critical disruptions could occur across the vast jurisdiction of HHS programs — including the seasonal flu program.
Medicare, which insures nearly 59 million seniors and disabled people, will keep going. And so will Medicaid, which covers more than 74 million low-income and disabled people, including most nursing home residents.
States will continue to receive payments for the Children's Health Insurance Program, which covers about 9 million kids. However, long-term funding for the program will run out soon unless Congress acts to renew it.
Deep into a tough flu season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be unable to support the government's annual seasonal flu program. And CDC's ability to respond to disease outbreaks will be significantly reduced.
JUSTICE DEPARTMENT
Many of the nearly 115,000 Justice Department employees have national security and public safety responsibilities that allow them to keep working during a shutdown. Special counsel Robert Mueller's team investigating Russian meddling in the presidential election will also continue working. His office is paid for indefinitely.
The more than 95,000 employees who are 'exempted' include most of the members of the national security division, U.S. attorneys, and most of the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Marshals Service and federal prison employees. Criminal cases will continue, but civil cases will be postponed as long as doing so doesn't compromise public safety. Most law enforcement training will be canceled, per the department's contingency plan.


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A United States Capitol Police Officer sets up police tape and gates on the plaza of the The United States Capitol Building Friday

STATE DEPARTMENT
Many State Department operations will continue in a shutdown. Passport and visa processing, which are largely self-funded by consumer fees, will not shut down. The agency's main headquarters in Washington, in consultation with the nearly 300 embassies, consulates and other diplomatic missions around the world, will draw up lists of nonessential employees who will be furloughed.
Department operations will continue through the weekend and staffers will be instructed to report for work as usual on Monday to find out whether they have been furloughed.
DEFENSE DEPARTMENT
The U.S. military will continue to fight wars and conduct missions around the world, including in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. And members of the military will report to work, though they won't get paid until Congress approves funding.
But Defense Secretary Jim Mattis warned Friday that a shutdown will have far-reaching effects.
'Our maintenance activities will probably pretty much shut down,' he said during remarks at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. 'We do a lot of intelligence operations around the world, and they cost money. Those, obviously, would stop. And I would just tell you that training for almost our entire reserve force will stop.'
And, while ships will remain at sea and airstrikes against enemy fighters will continue, any National Guard forces heading out to do weekend training duty around the country will arrive at armories and be told to go home.
US INTELLIGENCE AGENCIES
The workforce at the 17 U.S. intelligence agencies will be pared down significantly, according to a person familiar with contingency procedures.
The official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss the matter and spoke on condition of anonymity, said employees who are considered essential and have to work will do so with no expectation of a regular paycheck.
While they can be kept on the job, federal workers can't be paid for days worked during a shutdown. In the past, however, they have been paid retroactively even if they were ordered to stay home.
HOMELAND SECURITY DEPARTMENT
A department spokesman said nearly 90 percent of Homeland Security employees are considered essential and will continue to perform their duties during a government shutdown.
That means most Customs and Border Protection and Transportation Security Administration workers will stay on the job, according to the department's shutdown plan, dated Friday.
Immigration and Customs Enforcement will be staffed at about 78 percent, meaning more than 15,000 of the agency's employees will keep working. The Secret Service, also part of Homeland Security, will retain more than 5,700 employees during the shutdown.  
INTERIOR DEPARTMENT
The Interior Department says national parks and other public lands will remain as accessible as possible. That position is a change from previous shutdowns, when most parks were closed and became high-profile symbols of dysfunction.
Spokeswoman Heather Swift said the American public — especially veterans who come to the nation's capital — should find war memorials and open-air parks available to visitors. Swift said many national parks and wildlife refuges nationwide will also be open with limited access when possible.
She said public roads that already are open are likely to remain open, though services that require staffing and maintenance such as campgrounds, full-service restrooms and concessions won't be operating. Backcountry lands and culturally sensitive sites are likely to be restricted or closed, she said.
TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT
More than half — 34,600 — of the Department of Transportation's 55,100 employees will continue working during a shutdown. The bulk of those staying on the job work for the Federal Aviation Administration, which operates the nation's air traffic control system.
Controllers and aviation, pipeline and railroad safety inspectors are among those who would continue to work.
But certification of new aircraft will be limited, and processing of airport construction grants, training of new controllers, registration of planes, air traffic control modernization research and development, and issuance of new pilot licenses and medical certificates will stop.
At the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, investigations on auto safety defects will be suspended, incoming information on possible defects from manufacturers and consumers won't be reviewed and compliance testing of vehicles and equipment will be delayed.
The Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, whose operations are mostly paid for out of the Federal Highway Trust Fund, will continue most of their functions. The fund's revenue comes from federal gas and diesel taxes, which will continue to be collected. But work on issuing new regulations will stop throughout the department and its nine agencies.
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the agency's infectious disease chief, said a government shutdown will be disruptive to research and morale at the National Institutes of Health but will not adversely affect patients already in medical studies.
'We still take care of them,' he said of current NIH patients. But other types of research would be seriously harmed, Fauci said.
A shutdown could mean interrupting research that's been going on for years, Fauci said. The NIH is the government's primary agency responsible for biomedical and public health research across 27 institutes and centers. Its research ranges from cancer studies to the testing and creation of vaccines.
'You can't push the pause button on an experiment,' he said.
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has instructed workers there to come to work next week even with a shutdown. Pruitt said in an email to all EPA employees on Friday that the agency had 'sufficient resources to remain open for a limited amount of time.' He said further instructions would come if the shutdown lasts for more than a week.
The instructions from Pruitt are different from how the agency has operated during prior shutdowns and the contingency plan posted on EPA's website. A spokesman for the agency said earlier on Friday that the December 2017 plan was no longer valid.  


'What happened to the President Trump who asked us to come up with a deal and promised to take the heat for it?' Schumer said from the Senate floor. 
'What happened to that President Trump?' 
The federal government shut down at the stroke of midnight Friday - halting all but the most essential operations and marring the one-year anniversary of Trump's inauguration in a striking display of Washington dysfunction.
Senate Republicans fell far short of passing a procedural motion that would have kept the federal government funded, causing the fourth government shutdown in a quarter century. The final vote was 50-49.  

Five Democrats who represent Trump-country red states crossed the aisle to vote with Republicans, but the GOP lost four of its own, erasing any doubts about the state of partisan bickering in the US Capitol. 
While the clerk held the vote open – Republicans John McCain and Mitch McConnell refrained from voting so nothing could be finalized – a bipartisan group of 15 senators huddled on the Senate floor to discuss a path forward.
The recalcitrant Democrats included four who are up for re-election this year – Joe Manchin of West Virginia, Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Claire McCaskill of Missouri – along with Alabamian Doug Jones, who took his Senate seat just days ago in a bright red state.  
Despite hours of attempted negotiations, talks failed and the shutdown was finalized, and quickly the blame game began.


Just after midnight on Saturday morning the White House released a statement, calling Democrats 'obstructionist losers' who 'put politics above our national security, military families, vulnerable children, and our country's ability to serve all Americans'. 
'We will not negotiate the status of unlawful immigrants while Democrats hold our lawful citizens hostage over their reckless demands. This is the behavior of obstructionist losers, not legislators,' the statement reads, before promising that during the shutdown Trump will continue to work for the American people.   


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Senate Republicans fell far short of passing a procedural motion that could have kept the federal government funded past midnight on Friday, failing to attract the 60 votes they needed and hurtling the nation toward a partial government shutdown


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Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York and Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky sequestered themselves in a far-away corner, negotiating an endgame. The pair are pictured together Wednesday  


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While the clerk held the vote open – Republicans John McCain and Mitch McConnell refrained from voting so nothing could be finalized – a bipartisan group of 15 senators huddled on the Senate floor to discuss a path forward.


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After dinner, President Donald Trump seemed resigned to presiding over the first shutdown since 2013 


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President Trump's latest tweet comes just hours after he attempted to stave off the shutdown when he met with Senate Democratic Leader Chuck Schumer Friday evening. After the meeting he said he was 'making progress' on a deal to prevent the shutdown


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Republicans pressed the vote anyway, positioning their foes as obstructionists in a classic battle over who would shoulder the blame, despite evidence showing the contrary. Pictured is Lindsey Graham speaking with reporters in Washington just before the vote 

[size=18]Opposition pleads for Bipartisan Budget legislation



[/size][/size]

Vice President Mike Pence also weighed in on his way to Israel - blasting Senate Democrats for the congressional failure to keep the government open. 
In a statement he said: 'Our administration will do everything within our power to support the brave men and women in uniform who stand on the frontlines of freedom. But as of tonight, due to a completely avoidable government shutdown, they’ll stand their post without pay.'  
McConnell and Schumer each took the floor after the shutdown was finalized Friday night - with each lawmaker attempting to paint the opposition party as guilty. 
'The decision by Senate Democrats to shove aside millions of Americans for the sake of irresponsible political gain was 100 percent avoidable,' McConnell said. 
He claimed that the Democrats held the opposition party 'hostage' 'over the completely unrelated issue of illegal immigration.'  
'We're gonna keep on voting. The government may be headed into a shutdown, but the Senate is not shutting down. The American people expect better from us than this.' 
Schumer took the floor just after his opponent - immediately blaming McConnell for pushing through the vote when he knew he didn't have the numbers to back it up.
The seasoned Democrat explained that he met with Trump earlier in the day, saying he'd put the border wall on the table for discussion in exchange for DACA protections. 
'But even that wasn't enough,' he said. 
'The American people know this party is not capable of governing. This will be called the Trump shutdown, because no one deserves blame for the position we find ourselves in other than President Trump.' 
But despite Trump's attempts to paint democrats as the guilty party - recent polls show Republicans and President Trump will bear most of the blame.


A national ABC News/Washington Post poll released Friday found 48 percent of people surveyed say they will blame Trump and the GOP for a shutdown, while only 28 percent will blame Democrats. 
And another survey by Quinnipiac had similar results - with 32 percent saying they would blame Republicans, 21 percent blaming Trump, and 34 percent blaming Democrats.  
Since the shutdown began at the start of a weekend, many of the immediate effects will be muted for most Americans. But any damage could build quickly if the closure is prolonged. 
And it comes with no shortage of embarrassment for the president and political risk for both parties, as they wager that voters will punish the other at the ballot box in November.    

Even before the vote, President Donald Trump was pessimistic - seeming resigned to presiding over the first shutdown since 2013.
'Not looking good for our great Military or Safety & Security on the dangerous Southern Border,' Trump tweeted, referring to the hit the Homeland Security Department would take in the event the government's wheels grind to a halt.    
'Dems want a Shutdown in order to help diminish the great success of the Tax Cuts, and what they are doing for our booming economy,' the president claimed.
With the Friday's late-night voting failure, Congress will have failed to keep the lights on in Washington for just the fourth time in a quarter-century.  


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The recalcitrant Democrats included four who are up for re-election this year – Joe Manchin of West Virginia (pictured), Joe Donnelly of Indiana, Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota and Claire McCaskill of Missouri – along with Alabamian Doug Jones, who took his Senate seat just days ago in a bright red state


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Democrats in the Senate had emerged from their mid-evening meeting largely united, and predicting that the funding measure – a modest bill funding the government for only four weeks – would go down to defeat. Schumer and Senator Tom Carper are pictured after the meeting  


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The New Yorkers broke off talks without an agreement. But they said in separate statements that 'progress' had been made on a deal


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President Donald Trump suggested Friday morning that a government shutdown might be coming by day's end, and prepared to blame Democrats in the Senate who are threatening to block the latest stopgap funding bill



White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee-Sanders was one of the first to use the hashtag Friday night, claiming that Democrats voted against the bill to undermine Trump's new tax law


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Marc Short, center, White House director for legislative affairs, grimaces as he answers reporters questions on Friday night. With the Friday's late-night voting failure, Congress will have failed to keep the lights on in Washington for just the fourth time in a quarter-century


WHITE HOUSE'S FULL STATEMENT AFTER FRIDAY NIGHT'S SHUTDOWN


Senate Democrats own the Shumer Shutdown. 
Tonight, they put politics above our national security, military families, vulnerable children, and our country's ability to serve all Americans. 
We will not negotiate the status of unlawful immigrants while Democrats hold our lawful citizens hostage over their reckless demands. This is the behavior of obstructionist losers, not legislators. 
When Democrats start paying our armed forces and first responders we will reopen negotiations on immigration reform. 
During this politically manufactured Schumer Shutdown, the President and his Administration will fight for and protect the American people.  



The White House risks being blamed for the mess that will result as letter-carriers, military contractors and park rangers wonder whether to come to work – and doubt they'll be paid.
Democrats, too, risk being called obstructionists as the GOP branded the confrontation a 'Schumer shutdown' and carped that liberals were holding the entire government's budget hostage to a demand that 'illegal immigrants' receive special treatment. 
White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee-Sanders was one of the first to use the hashtag Friday night, claiming that Democrats voted against the bill to undermine Trump's new tax law. 
'Democrats can't shut down the booming Trump economy. Are they now so desperate they'll shut down the government instead? #SchumerShutdown,' she tweeted just before midnight.  
Democrats are insisting on a permanent recognition of legal status for hundreds of thousands of people brought to the US illegally as minors, a move that perplexed Republicans since there was no legislative language available that could accomplish it.
The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, an Obama-era relic, guarantees protection from deportation for so-called 'DREAMers.'
Trump summoned Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer to the White House Friday afternoon in the hope of cutting a deal. But the two New Yorkers emerged without an agreement.
'We made some progress, but we still have a good number of disagreements,' Schumer said when he returned to Capitol Hill. 
The president called off a planned weekend in Florida where he was to attend a big-ticket gala commemorating his first year in office.
The event at his private Mar-a-Lago resort club commanded as much as $250,000 per couple for Republican campaign coffers. His sons Donald Jr. and Eric are expected to attend in his place. 

But ultimately a broad range of federal operations would be curtailed, although food inspections, law enforcement, airport security and other vital services would continue, along with Social Security and military operations.  
House Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer of Maryland told reporters that 'if there's any good news, it's a weekend. If we act tomorrow as I think we could, and I think we should, and reach compromises, then we could pass something before the weekend ends and the impact would be minimal.' 

[size=18]Schumer says there's still no deal after long meeting with Trump




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[size=34]CONGRESS HAS SHUT DOWN THE GOVERNMENT: NOW WHAT?[/size]


The US government shutdown began at midnight Friday as Democrats and Republicans failed to resolve a standoff over immigration and spending. Here's a look at what the parties are fighting over and what it means to shut down the government.
WHAT ARE LAWMAKERS FIGHTING ABOUT?
Since the end of the fiscal year in September, the government has been operating on temporary funding measures. The current one expired at midnight. Republicans and Democrats have not been able to agree on spending levels for the rest of the year, so another short-term measure is the most likely solution. The House has passed a four-week bill Thursday that also extends funding for a children's health insurance program.
But Democrats have been saying for weeks they want a funding measure to be tied to an immigration deal that protects the thousands of young immigrants facing deportation. The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program is set to expire March 5, and members of both parties have been working on an extension that would also beef up border protection.
That deal has not come together, and Democrats have decided to dig in. They blocked the House-passed bill. Both sides were still negotiating early Saturday. 


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Shutdown: Police tape marks a secured area of the Capitol, Friday in Washington

THEY'VE BLOWN THE DEADLINE. NOW WHAT? 
The government begins to shut down. But not all of the government.
The air traffic control system, food inspection, Medicare, veterans' health care and many other essential government programs will run as usual. The Social Security Administration will not only send out benefits but will also continue to take applications — though replacements for lost Social Security cards could have to wait. The Postal Service, which is self-funded, will keep delivering the mail. The Federal Emergency Management Agency will continue to respond to last year's spate of disasters.
The Interior Department says national parks and other public lands will remain as accessible as possible. The stance is a change from previous shutdowns when most parks were closed and became high-profile symbols.
Spokeswoman Heather Swifts says the American public — especially veterans who come to the nation's capital — should find war memorials and open-air parks open to visitors. Swift says many national parks and wildlife refuges nationwide will also be open with limited access when possible.
The Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo will stay open through the weekend but close Monday. 
DO FEDERAL WORKERS GET PAID?
While they can be kept on the job, federal workers can't get paid for days worked during a lapse in funding. In the past, however, they have been repaid retroactively even if they were ordered to stay home.
Rush hour in downtown Washington, meanwhile, becomes a breeze. Tens of thousands of federal workers are off the roads. 
HOW OFTEN DID THIS HAPPEN IN THE PAST?
Way back in the day, shutdowns usually weren't that big a deal. They happened every year when Jimmy Carter was president, averaging 11 days each. During Ronald Reagan's two terms, there were six shutdowns, typically just one or two days apiece. Deals got cut. Everybody moved on.
The last one was a 16-day partial shuttering of the government in 2013, which came as tea party conservatives, cheered on by outside groups like Heritage Action, demanded that language to block implementation of President Barack Obama's health care law be added to a must-do funding bill.
WHO WILL GET THE BLAME?
In a 1995-96 political battle, President Bill Clinton bested House Speaker Newt Gingrich and his band of budget-slashing conservatives, who were determined to use a shutdown to force Clinton to sign onto a balanced budget agreement. Republicans were saddled with the blame, but most Americans suffered relatively minor inconveniences like closed parks and delays in processing passport applications. The fight bolstered Clinton's popularity and he sailed to re-election that November.
In 2013, the tea party Republicans forced the shutdown over the better judgment of GOP leaders like then-Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. Republicans tried to fund the government piecemeal — for example, by forcing through legislation to ensure military service members got paid. But a broader effort faltered, and Republicans eventually backed down and supported a round of budget talks led by Paul Ryan, R-Wis., then chairman of the House Budget Committee.
Republicans are calling the current standoff the 'Schumer Shutdown,' arguing that there's nothing in the bill that Democrats oppose, while a short-term extension would give lawmakers time to work out differences on issues like protecting young immigrants and disaster assistance. Schumer says the GOP's unwillingness to compromise has brought Congress to this point. A Washington Post-ABC News poll conducted earlier this week found 48 percent view Trump and congressional Republicans as mainly responsible for the situation while 28 percent fault Democrats. If the shutdown drags on for long, it could give voters another reason to turn away from incumbents of both parties in a mid-term election.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Sat 20 Jan 2018, 16:46

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5292295/Womens-March-anniversary-Trumps-inauguration.html

[size=34]'We were mad last year and we are STILL mad': Thousands take to the streets across the country for Women's March on first anniversary of Trump's inauguration[/size]
By REUTERS REPORTER
PUBLISHED: 11:16 EST, 20 January 2018 | UPDATED: 11:19 EST, 20 January 2018

    


Tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets of New York, Los Angeles and Washington on Saturday for the second Women's March, a multi-city mass rally hailed as the start of a new era of female political activism.  
This year's demonstration is being held in coordination with rallies planned for the weekend in some 250 other cities across the United States and overseas and marks the first anniversary of President Donald Trump's inauguration.
'People were pretty damn mad last year and they're pretty damn mad this year,' said Tamika Mallory, co-president of the Women's March board.
Like last year, thousands of marchers are expected to don pink knit 'pussy hats', which were created as a joking reference to a comment made by Trump about female genitalia and quickly became a symbol of women's empowerment and opposition to the new president in the early days of his administration.

Mallory said the rallies may take on a light-hearted or even celebratory tone at times, but added: 'We also know that serious business has to happen.'


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People participate in the Second Annual Women's March in Washington,
The biggest marches are expected on Saturday in Washington and New York, with 10,000 and 37,000 people signed up on their respective Facebook pages. But the number of participants is likely to fall well short of the estimated 5 million who marched on Jan. 21. 2017 and made that one of the largest mass protests in U.S. history.   
Despite the more modest expectations this year, organizers hope to build on the raw energy felt by Trump opponents immediately after his surprise election victory and channel it into gains for progressive candidates in November's midterm elections, using the theme 'Power to the Polls.'
Specifically, organizers want to register a million new voters and get more strong advocates for women's rights into office.
Activists say Trump's policies rolling back birth control and equal pay protections have propelled many women into activism for the first time.
A White House spokesman did not respond to a request for comment on the marches.
The rallies also come during what has been seen as a pivotal year for women's rights with the #MeToo and #TimesUp social media effort against sexual harassment and abuse that was born out of a string of scandals in Hollywood, Washington and elsewhere.
Some critics said this year's march lacked a focus. Targeting an issue such as immigration would have greater impact, said Shikha Dalmia, a senior analyst at the Reason Foundation, a libertarian think tank.


+2


People take part in the Women's March in Manhattan in New York City, New York
'Beating the feminist drum just seems to me beside the point. Maybe they are trying to cast as wide a net as possible,' Dalmia said by telephone.
The marches will be followed by more events on Sunday, including in Las Vegas, which was chosen by organizers to honor the city where the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history took place last August. Nevada is also a key battleground state in the 2018 midterm elections.
The voter registration campaign will target swing states held by Republicans, such as Nevada, and in districts considered a toss-up ahead of November's midterm elections.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Donnamarie on Sun 21 Jan 2018, 04:23

Now that’s a good news story.  Thanks annemarie!
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Sun 21 Jan 2018, 20:11

Totally agree! Did anyone march?

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Donnamarie on Sun 21 Jan 2018, 21:07

PAN, I was planning on going again this year but have been a bit under the weather this week so I didn’t think I could manage all the walking.  Crying or Very sad
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Sun 21 Jan 2018, 22:00

Did anyone see Trump's tweet? That moron was trying to make it sound like the marches were to celebrate him! I wouldn't be surprised if he really believes it!
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Mon 22 Jan 2018, 18:59

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5298521/Circus-without-tent-Senate-closer-ending-shutdown.html

[size=34]BREAKING NEWS: Government shutdown will end with Senate Democrats' vote to restore funding after Republican leader promises to take up DACA and immigration[/size]

  • The government shutdown will end after three day after Republicans and Democrats reached a deal on Monday

  • In an olive branch to Democrats, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said he would seek to bring forward DACA legislation if Democrats switched sides

  • Democrats showed their first sign of inching toward his position and relenting after an all-hands meeting where they agreed going along would be smart 

  • They changed course as Minority leader Chuck Schumer said he had cut a deal with McConnell – with no help from the White House

  • Deal calls for funding the government through February 8, and makes that date the deadline for Republicans to hold a vote to preserve DACA 

  • Final 81-18 vote included support from 33 Democrats; Republican Sen. John McCain was absent 

  • The White House says President Trump won't back any DACA deal that doesn't also resolve border security, chain migration and the diversity visa lottery 


By DAVID MARTOSKO, US POLITICAL EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM 
PUBLISHED: 11:27 EST, 22 January 2018 | UPDATED: 13:53 EST, 22 January 2018

    


Senate Democrats accepted a deal to reopen the government on Monday, after Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pledged to take up immigration legislation – including a permanent fix for the controversial DACA program – in the next three weeks.
'The Republican leader and I have come to an arrangement,' Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said on the Senate floor.
'It is a good solution, and I will vote for it,' he said.
The Senate bill has one final test, a fresh vote in the House of Representatives, but quick passage is expected over House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi's objections.

The final 81-18 tally was a far cry from the crashing failure of a similar measure on Friday that saw handfuls of Senators from both parties crossing the aisle but fall well short of the 60 votes needed for passage.
When the dust settled, 33 of the 49 Democrats had voted to turn the lights back on. Republican Sen. John McCain, ailing with brain cancer, was absent.


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Eight-one senators including 33 Democrats voted to reopen the government on Monday folling a three-day standoff over immigration reform




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'The Republican leader and I have come to an arrangement,' Minority Leader Chuck Schumer said on the Senate floor, signaling an end to the three-day government shutdown



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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Monday that if Democrats agreed to end the shutdown, he would promise to take up immigration legislation by February 8


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Democrats, led by Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, are standing their ground and show no sign of relenting in advance of a noontime vote 

[size=10][size=18]Mitch McConnell urges end to U.S. government shutdown




[/size][/size]

Schumer warned that 'the Republican majority now has 17 days to prevent the DREAMers from being deported.'

DACA, the program that protects millions of illegal immigrants from deportation because they were brought to the U.S. as minors, is the sticking point for Democrats who fear Republicans will reneg on any promise to save it before it expires in March.  
'If an agreement isn't reached by February 8, the Senate will immediately proceed to consideration of legislation dealing with DACA,' Schumer said, describing his understanding of the deal.
'While this procedure will not satisfy everyone on both sides, it's a way forward.'
But he blasted the White House for sitting on the sidelines as senators hashed out an agreement. 
'Despite all our entreaties, the president was obstinate,' he fumed. 
White House deputy press secretary Raj Shah said after the vote on CNN that President Trump won't accept an immigration deal that makes the DACA program permanent without giving him a host of other wins.
Shah mentioned 'the issue of border security, and a southern border wall, the issue of ending the visa lottery system, and reforming the chain migration – the extended family chain migration system.'
'Those are still the points and the contours of a deal that this president would be open to,' he said.

[size=18]Government shutdown ends as Senate comes to an agreement
[/size]Duration 















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White House deputy press secretary Raj Shah said the White House won't accept an immigration bill that doesn't address border security, the diversity visa lottery and chain migration



55 shares


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Monday's vote was eagerly awaited and hotly contested but ultimately even a majority of Democrats agreed to support the Republicans' proposal
Minutes before the lunchtime vote, Democrats emerged from a caucus meeting and word leaked that enough of them will vote with Republicans to push a short-term funding measure over the finish line.
'It was very positive. I think the government will be back open by 12:10 or 12:15,' West Virginia Sen. Joe Manchin said after the Democrats' all-hands meeting.
Democrats were looking for a way out of the shutdown, according to people in the room, despite the lack of any assurance of what might happens in the House of Representatives once the Senate ricochets the result to the south end of the U.S. Capitol.
'I'm encouraged by commitments Leader McConnell has made,' Democratic Sen. Chris Coons told reporters as he left the meeting room, adding that he was 'looking forward to the vote and I think it will be important that we take a step forward.' 
An end to the weekend stalemate looked unlikely just hours earlier in the upper chamber of Congress since Friday.
'It's like a circus without a tent,' Republican Sen. John Kennedy of Louisiana told reporters, describing the overall mood in the Senate.
McConnell said: 'I hope and intend that we can reach bipartisan solutions on issues such as military spending, immigration and border security, and disaster relief before this February 8 deadline.'


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McConnell is presiding over a chaotic chamber where the typical comity has dissolved into open warfare over who is to blame for the shutdown
'Should these issues not be resolved by the time the funding bill before us expires on February 8, so long as the government remains open it – so long as it remains open – it would be my intention to take up legislation here in the Senate that would address DACA, border security, and related issues.'
Democrats moved quickly to frame Monday's result as a victory despite the widespread perception that they had caved.
'As recently as Friday night, Leader McConnell refused to commit to taking up the DREAM Act with any urgency,' Virginia Senators Tim Kaine and Mark Warner said in a statement. 
'Today, Republican leadership has finally agreed to bring bipartisan legislation to protect Dreamers to the floor in the next three weeks, and both parties – as well as the American public – will hold them to it.'
The White House was having none of it.
'The fact that they're voting in favor of this proposal that they rejected just a few days ago is, sort of, evidence that they blinked,' deputy press secretary Raj Shah said of the Democrats on CNN. 
Schumer claimed Sunday that he had offered Trump an authorization to build his border wall in exchange for passing a funding measure with a DACA fix attached, but that the president had refused.
'[He] can't take "yes" for an answer,' Schumer said on the Senate floor a day ago.
But White House budget chief Mick Mulvaney quickly called Schumer's offer a hollow one, saying that the 'authorization' has existed since 2006 – something that Schumer himself voted for – but the New York Democrat hadn't promised to go along with actually funding it.
Democrats showed no sign of budging on Monday but insisted they're not to blame for the government shutdown.  
'There's been a lot of positive progress made,' Michigan Democratic Sen. Stabenow told Politico. 'No one wants to shut down the government.'


+15


Moderate Republican senators Lindsey Graham (left), Susan Collins (center) and Jeff Flake (right) said McConnell should have made a more ironclad pledge


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The result, said Republican Sen. John Kennedy, is 'like a circus without a tent'; Kenned is pictured at the U.S. Capitol on Friday
She wouldn't commit to voting 'yes,' however, despite facing a tough re-election fight this year in a state the Trump won handily in 2016.
Montana Democratic Sen. Jon Tester, another endangered Democrat representing a deep-red state, initially said he was likely to take McConnell at his word. 
'I believe a man's word is his bond, so I'm going to take McConnell the same way,' he said. In addition to a pledge to work on immigration, Tester wants a commitment to fund community health centers.
But ultimately, Tester voted 'no.' 
McConnell said Monday that 'the Senate cannot make progress on any of these crucial matters until the government is re-opened. We need to move forward. The first step is ending this shutdown.'
Talking to reporters after McConnell's speech, Republican Sen. Susan Collins said the majority leader should have made a stronger, more iron-clad promise.


[size=34]HOW THE SHUTDOWN IS IMPACTING GOVERNMENT SITES[/size]



 What's Closed 
The Library of Congress
Capitol Visitor Center
The Liberty Bell  
Atlanta's Ebenezer Baptist Church - the King Center will remain open
Ford's Theatre and Museum - theater performances continue
Cabrillo National Monument 
National Park Services in Boston 
NASA - no tours  
What's Open
The Post Office 
The Grand Canyon - Gov. Doug Ducey keeping the monument open with state funds 
The Statue of Liberty - Gov. Andrew Cuomo reopening the monument with state funds  
Smithsonian facilities 
Mount Rushmore - some National Park Services facilities closed, but restrooms and concession stands open
Yellowstone National Park - but with limited services 
Mount Rushmore - including concessions 
Alcatraz 
Oklahoma City National Memorial and Museum 
Flight 93 Memorial - grounds are open, concessions are closed  


'I think it would be helpful if the language were a little bit stronger because the tensions are so high,' Collins said, although she added that Schumer should give McConnell credit for 'moving on the DACA issue.'
'In the end it's going to be up to the two leaders, and I hope that they can come together,' she said. 
Sen. Lindsey Graham, too, urged McConnell to use stronger language committing to an immigration vote.
And he called on Democrats to push the top Republican for a more ironclad promise.
'I can't believe I'm saying this but Rand Paul is right,' he quipped.
Graham said he hopes the government reopens by the end of the day. 'If it doesn't, I just don't know where we go from here,' he added.
Graham voted against Friday's funding measure whose failure led to the shutdown. Collins voted in favor of it.
Both supported Monday's measure. 'Today we've taken a significant step forward,' Collins said after the roll call.






President Donald Trump said Monday that Democrats 'are turning down services and security for citizens in favor of services and security for non-citizens' as they demand a DACA fix in exchange for government funding
President Trump lashed out at congressional Democrats on Monday morning for refusing to vote in favor of a funding reboot.
Republicans, who hold 51 Senate seats, need at least nine Democrats to join them in order to pass a 60-vote threshold for a short-term budget measure.
Meanwhile, some military and other national security funding is on hold – along with federal spending on social welfare programs like community health centers and children's medical insurance. 
'The Democrats are turning down services and security for citizens in favor of services and security for non-citizens. Not good!' Trump tweeted Monday morning. 
He also suggested that Senate liberals are pulling the strings of centrists who might be leaning toward ending the shutdown.
'Democrats have shut down our government in the interests of their far left base. They don’t want to do it but are powerless!' he added in a second tweet. 
Republicans and Democrats remain at loggerheads and have been unable to strike a deal to fund the government, extending Friday's shutdown to a third day – and into an uncertain workweek for federal employees. 


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White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said Democrats, who hold enough votes to block a compromise, must 'stop playing games and come to the table and get serious'



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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer assigned blame for the government shutdown to President Trump

[size=18]Schumer calls Trump a 'dysfunctional president' during shutdown




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The lack of a deal meant hundreds of thousands of public sector workers could not show up for work on Monday.
White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders blasted Democrats Monday on 'Good Morning America,' saying that they're 'playing political games' while soldiers go unpaid and children's health programs are left in the lurch. 
'Democrats support everything in this piece of legislation. The fact that they won't simply vote for it, to re-open our government, fund our military, protect the most vulnerable children, is mind-boggling, I think, to everyone across this country,' Sanders said.
'I hope that Democrats will stop playing games and come to the table and get serious about what they were elected to come here and do.'
She insisted that the White House stands ready to negotiate on immigration policy – the Democrats' chief hang-up – as soon as the government is reopened.

[size=18]Senator Mitch McConnell calls shutdown 'totally unnecessary'



[/size]




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'Open the government, then we'll resume negotiations,' House Speaker Paul Ryan said Monday morning. 'It's just that clear, it's just that simple'


+15


White House budget chief Mick Mulvaney said Monday morning that 'the government should be open. We should not, however, be negotiating over a non-financial issue, the DACA issue, as part of keeping the government open'
House Speaker Paul Ryan, whose chamber passed a government funding measure on Thursday, said on 'Fox & Friends' that Democrats are wrong to hold the government 'hostage.'
'Open the government. Then we'll resume negotiations. It's just that clear. It's just that simple,' he said.
White House budget director Mick Mulvaney said on 'CBS This Morning' that no one at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue wanted to see the government's wheels grind to a halt.
'Everyone admits and acknowledges the president did not want this shutdown [and] actively worked to prevent the shutdown,' Mulvaney said.
He also objected to Democrats holding the budget hostage to a permanent DADA solution.
'The government should be open. We should not, however, be negotiating over a non-financial issue, the DACA issue, as part of keeping the government open,' Mulvaney declared.
In his tweet on Sunday, Trump said, 'The Dems just want illegal immigrants to pour into our nation unchecked.'
Trump's presidential campaign also put out a video that called Democrats 'complicit in all murders' committed by undocumented immigrants.  Late Sunday afternoon, his campaign put out a fundraising email again calling the Democrats 'COMPLICIT.' 


[size=34]WHITE HOUSE VOICEMAIL BLAMES DEMOCRATS FOR SHUTDOWN[/size]


Americans trying to call the public comments line at the White House cannot get through because of the government shutdown.
But the Trump administration has changed the voicemail message callers receive when they dial the number.
Anyone calling 202-456-1111 gets the following message:



'Thank you for calling the White House. Unfortunately, we cannot answer your call today because congressional Democrats are holding government funding—including funding for our troops and other national security priorities—hostage to an unrelated immigration debate.
'Due to this obstruction, the government is shut down. In the meantime, you can leave a comment for the president at www.whitehouse.gov/contact.
'We look forward to taking your calls as soon as the government reopens.'




[size=18]Schumer criticizes Trump for shutdown of the federal government



[/size]

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders also put out a statement whacking Schumer late Sunday afternoon, suggesting he wasn't being honest about what happened at Friday's White House meeting.  
'Sen. Schumer's memory is hazy because his account of Friday's meeting is false,' Huckabee Sanders said in a statement given to reporters. 'And the president's position is clear: we will not negotiate on the status of unlawful immigrants while Sen. Schumer and the Democrats hold the government for millions of Americans and our troops hostage.' 
The White House has since changed its voicemail message noting that the government has shut down. 
Anyone calling 202-456-1111 to leave a message with the White House hears a recorded message saying that 'unfortunately we cannot answer your call today because congressional Democrats are holding government funding – including funding for our troops and other national security priorities– hostage to an unrelated immigration debate.'

[size=18]Senators respond to the vote that caused government shutdown


[/size]
















[size=34]GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: WHAT'S CLOSED? WHO IS AFFECTED?[/size]


The federal government shutdown only partially curbs operations. But the longer the shutdown continues, the more likely its impact will be felt.
U.S. troops will stay at their posts and mail will get delivered, but almost half of the 2 million civilian federal workers will be barred from doing their jobs if the shutdown extends into Monday.
How key parts of the federal government would be affected by a shutdown:


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A general view of The United States Capitol is seen in Washington Friday as the shutdown begins

INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE
A shutdown plan posted on the Treasury Department's website shows that nearly 44 percent of the IRS' 80,565 employees will be exempt from being furloughed during a shutdown. That would mean nearly 45,500 IRS employees will be sent home just as the agency is preparing for the start of the tax filing season and ingesting the sweeping changes made by the new GOP tax law.
The Republican architects of the tax law have promised that millions of working Americans will see heftier paychecks next month, with less money withheld by employers in anticipation of lower income taxes. The IRS recently issued new withholding tables for employers.
But Marcus Owens, who for 10 years headed the IRS division dealing with charities and political organizations, said it's a 'virtual certainty' that the larger paychecks will be delayed if there's a lengthy government shutdown.
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES DEPARTMENT
Half of the more than 80,000 employees will be sent home. Key programs will continue to function because their funding has ongoing authorization and doesn't depend on annual approval by Congress. But critical disruptions could occur across the vast jurisdiction of HHS programs — including the seasonal flu program.
Medicare, which insures nearly 59 million seniors and disabled people, will keep going. And so will Medicaid, which covers more than 74 million low-income and disabled people, including most nursing home residents.
States will continue to receive payments for the Children's Health Insurance Program, which covers about 9 million kids. However, long-term funding for the program will run out soon unless Congress acts to renew it.
Deep into a tough flu season, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will be unable to support the government's annual seasonal flu program. And CDC's ability to respond to disease outbreaks will be significantly reduced.
JUSTICE DEPARTMENT
Many of the nearly 115,000 Justice Department employees have national security and public safety responsibilities that allow them to keep working during a shutdown. Special counsel Robert Mueller's team investigating Russian meddling in the presidential election will also continue working. His office is paid for indefinitely.
The more than 95,000 employees who are 'exempted' include most of the members of the national security division, U.S. attorneys, and most of the FBI, Drug Enforcement Administration, Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, U.S. Marshals Service and federal prison employees. Criminal cases will continue, but civil cases will be postponed as long as doing so doesn't compromise public safety. Most law enforcement training will be canceled, per the department's contingency plan.


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A United States Capitol Police Officer sets up police tape and gates on the plaza of the The United States Capitol Building Friday

STATE DEPARTMENT
Many State Department operations will continue in a shutdown. Passport and visa processing, which are largely self-funded by consumer fees, will not shut down. The agency's main headquarters in Washington, in consultation with the nearly 300 embassies, consulates and other diplomatic missions around the world, will draw up lists of nonessential employees who will be furloughed.
Department operations will continue through the weekend and staffers will be instructed to report for work as usual on Monday to find out whether they have been furloughed.
DEFENSE DEPARTMENT
The U.S. military will continue to fight wars and conduct missions around the world, including in Iraq, Syria and Afghanistan. And members of the military will report to work, though they won't get paid until Congress approves funding.
But Defense Secretary Jim Mattis warned Friday that a shutdown will have far-reaching effects.
'Our maintenance activities will probably pretty much shut down,' he said during remarks at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies. 'We do a lot of intelligence operations around the world, and they cost money. Those, obviously, would stop. And I would just tell you that training for almost our entire reserve force will stop.'
And, while ships will remain at sea and airstrikes against enemy fighters will continue, any National Guard forces heading out to do weekend training duty around the country will arrive at armories and be told to go home.
US INTELLIGENCE AGENCIES
The workforce at the 17 U.S. intelligence agencies will be pared down significantly, according to a person familiar with contingency procedures.
The official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss the matter and spoke on condition of anonymity, said employees who are considered essential and have to work will do so with no expectation of a regular paycheck.
While they can be kept on the job, federal workers can't be paid for days worked during a shutdown. In the past, however, they have been paid retroactively even if they were ordered to stay home.
HOMELAND SECURITY DEPARTMENT
A department spokesman said nearly 90 percent of Homeland Security employees are considered essential and will continue to perform their duties during a government shutdown.
That means most Customs and Border Protection and Transportation Security Administration workers will stay on the job, according to the department's shutdown plan, dated Friday.
Immigration and Customs Enforcement will be staffed at about 78 percent, meaning more than 15,000 of the agency's employees will keep working. The Secret Service, also part of Homeland Security, will retain more than 5,700 employees during the shutdown.  
INTERIOR DEPARTMENT
The Interior Department says national parks and other public lands will remain as accessible as possible. That position is a change from previous shutdowns, when most parks were closed and became high-profile symbols of dysfunction.
Spokeswoman Heather Swift said the American public — especially veterans who come to the nation's capital — should find war memorials and open-air parks available to visitors. Swift said many national parks and wildlife refuges nationwide will also be open with limited access when possible.
She said public roads that already are open are likely to remain open, though services that require staffing and maintenance such as campgrounds, full-service restrooms and concessions won't be operating. Backcountry lands and culturally sensitive sites are likely to be restricted or closed, she said.
TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT
More than half — 34,600 — of the Department of Transportation's 55,100 employees will continue working during a shutdown. The bulk of those staying on the job work for the Federal Aviation Administration, which operates the nation's air traffic control system.
Controllers and aviation, pipeline and railroad safety inspectors are among those who would continue to work.
But certification of new aircraft will be limited, and processing of airport construction grants, training of new controllers, registration of planes, air traffic control modernization research and development, and issuance of new pilot licenses and medical certificates will stop.
At the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, investigations on auto safety defects will be suspended, incoming information on possible defects from manufacturers and consumers won't be reviewed and compliance testing of vehicles and equipment will be delayed.
The Federal Highway Administration and the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration, whose operations are mostly paid for out of the Federal Highway Trust Fund, will continue most of their functions. The fund's revenue comes from federal gas and diesel taxes, which will continue to be collected. But work on issuing new regulations will stop throughout the department and its nine agencies.
NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH
Dr. Anthony Fauci, the agency's infectious disease chief, said a government shutdown will be disruptive to research and morale at the National Institutes of Health but will not adversely affect patients already in medical studies.
'We still take care of them,' he said of current NIH patients. But other types of research would be seriously harmed, Fauci said.
A shutdown could mean interrupting research that's been going on for years, Fauci said. The NIH is the government's primary agency responsible for biomedical and public health research across 27 institutes and centers. Its research ranges from cancer studies to the testing and creation of vaccines.
'You can't push the pause button on an experiment,' he said.
ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt has instructed workers there to come to work next week even with a shutdown. Pruitt said in an email to all EPA employees on Friday that the agency had 'sufficient resources to remain open for a limited amount of time.' He said further instructions would come if the shutdown lasts for more than a week.
The instructions from Pruitt are different from how the agency has operated during prior shutdowns and the contingency plan posted on EPA's website. A spokesman for the agency said earlier on Friday that the December 2017 plan was no longer valid. 
NATIONAL PARK SERVICE
NPS closes most national parks during government shutdowns. The agency controls 417 different 'units' from American Samoa to Maine. Of these 417 'units', 59 are national parks.
State parks and trails in certain national parks still remain open during government shutdowns. 
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo said Saturday that he would use state funds to keep the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island - together comprising the Statue of Liberty National Monument - open. The National Park Service announced that both New York sites would be closed Saturday 'due to a lapse in appropriations'. 
Arizona Governor Doug Ducey said Grand Canyon National Park would continue full operations despite the shutdown.
'If Washington, D.C., won’t function, Arizona will,' Ducey said in a stateme

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 23 Jan 2018, 20:42

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5300107/Trump-slaps-tariffs-foreign-washing-machines-solar-panels.html

[size=34]Trump slaps tariffs on foreign washing machines and solar panels in 'America First' move on trade - but importers say he will hit jobs and increase prices
[/size]

  • Trump is signing order Tuesday which will put tariffs of up to 50 per cent on imported washing machines and 40 per cent on solar panels 

  • Move will boost domestic manufacturers Whirlpool and General Electric which have accused rivals Samsung and LG of dumping products in the U.S.

  • Quarter of all washing machines are imported, including Sears own brand offerings, and Samsung predicted 'everyone will pay more with fewer choices'

  • South Korea accused U.S. of breaching World Trade Organization rules and European Union said it would hit back if its exports were affected

  • Tough on trade measure comes before Trump visits Davos with White House promising he will deliver 'America First' message to CEOs and billionaires 



By REUTERS
PUBLISHED: 18:42 EST, 22 January 2018 | UPDATED: 14:35 EST, 23 January 2018


    


U.S. President Donald Trump slapped steep tariffs on imported washing machines and solar panels in an order he was signing Tuesday.
The move gave a boost to Whirlpool and dealt a setback to the renewable energy industry in the first of several potential trade restrictions. 
The decisions were the first of several potential tariff actions that Trump may take in the coming weeks and months. 
They are being made ahead of his visit to the Davos World Economic Forum in Switzerland where the White House say he will deliver an 'America First' message to the CEOs, billionaires and celebrities who gather at what is seen as the key get-together for free-trade globalists.

Trump is considering recommendations on import restrictions for steel and aluminum on national security grounds under a 1962 trade law and tariffs or other trade sanctions against China over its intellectual property practices.


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America First: Trump imposed tariffs on washing machine and solar panel imports after a finding that American firms had been hit by dumping. The measure is intended to reassure his base that he is tough on trade


+6




+6



Domestic versus foreign: Imported washing machines such as those by Samsung (left) will be hit by tariffs of up to 20 per cent, which was welcomed by domestic manufacturer Whirlpool (right)
The washer tariffs are steeper than had been demanded by the domestic industry - 50 per cent at their highest. 
Trump will impose a 20 percent tariff on the first 1.2 million imported large residential washers in the first year, and a 50 percent tariff on machines above that number. The tariffs decline to 16 percent and 40 percent respectively in the third year.
A 30 percent tariff will be imposed on imported solar cells and modules in the first year, with the tariffs declining to 15 percent by the fourth year. The tariff allows 2.5 gigawatts of unassembled solar cells to be imported tariff-free in each year.
Whirlpool, which sought the washers 'safeguard' action against rivals Samsung Electronics and LG Electronics after years of anti-dumping cases, saw its shares rise.
'By enforcing our existing trade laws, President Trump has ensured American workers will compete on a level playing field with their foreign counterparts,' Whirlpool Chairman Jeff Fettig said in a statement. 
Samsung Electronics and LG Electronics expressed concern over the tariffs, saying they would hit U.S. consumers and jobs. 
Together they ship between 2.5 million to 3 million washing machines annually to the United States, with sales of around $1 billion, and they hold a quarter of a U.S. market dominated by Whirlpool and General Electric. 
Samsung recently began washer production in South Carolina, and LG is building a washer factory in Tennessee.



'This tariff is a tax on every consumer who wants to buy a washing machine. Everyone will pay more, with fewer choices,' Samsung said in a statement.
LG Electronics said that the decision will hinder the ramp-up and employment prospects of its new plant, which will not begin production until late 2018 or early 2019.
'It is clear that the latest safeguard measures would violate the WTO [World Trade Organization] rules,' South Korea's trade minister Kim Hyun-chong said in a meeting with industry officials. 'We will actively respond to protectionist measures.'
China, the world's biggest solar panel producer branded the move an 'overreaction' and said it would work with other WTO members to protect its interests.
'The U.S.'s decision ... is an abuse of trade remedy measures, and China expresses strong dissatisfaction regarding this,' Wang Hejun, the head of the commerce ministry's Trade Remedy and Investigation Bureau, said in a statement.
The decisions in the two 'Section 201' safeguard cases followed findings by the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) that both imported products 'are a substantial cause of serious injury to domestic manufacturers,' U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer said in a statement.
The washer tariffs exceeded the harshest recommendations from ITC members, while the solar tariffs were lower than domestic producers had hoped for. The restrictions aim to help domestic manufacturers but drew complaints that consumer costs for new washers and solar installations will rise.
Trump ignored a recommendation from the ITC to exclude South Korean-produced washers from LG from the tariffs, as prior anti-dumping duties on these machines have been dropped. The decision could also hurt retailer Sears Holdings, whose Kenmore brand sources its larger washers from LG's overseas factories.


LG shares fell as much as 5 percent in Seoul trading against the wider market´s 0.4 percent gain. Shares in Samsung Elec were up 0.83 percent.


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Record snowfall is causing havoc in the Alps and disrupting the World Economic Forum in Davos, which Trump will address Friday


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An armed Swiss police officer stands guard on the roof of a hotel near the congress center as the forum gets under way. Trump will speak on Friday with what the White House say will be an 'America First' message


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Blue-collar boost: Trump has been speaking tough on trade since the start of his campaign and went to a factory in Coraopolis, Pennsylvania, last week 




The tariffs are expected to slow a shift to renewable energy in the United States, just as solar was becoming cost competitive with electricity generated from fossil fuels like coal, an industry that Trump has pledged to protect.
MJ Shiao, head of renewable energy research for Wood Mackenzie, said the tariffs would likely reduce projected U.S. solar installations by 10 to 15 percent over the next five years.
'It is a significant impact, but certainly not destructive to the end market,' Shiao told Reuters.
The domestic solar panel producers who sought the trade remedies wanted tariffs of 50 percent - the highest allowed under law. Petitioners Suniva and SolarWorld have said they cannot compete with the influx of cheap imports, mostly from Chinese producers, which has caused solar panel prices to drop more than 30 percent since early 2016.
The U.S. solar trade group, the Solar Energy Industries Association, campaigned against the tariffs and estimated the decision would create a 'crisis' for the burgeoning industry and result in the loss of 23,000 U.S. jobs this year as billions of dollars in solar investments are canceled.
Suniva, majority-owned by Hong Kong-listed Shunfeng International Clean Energy Ltd, applauded the decision, saying that Trump 'is sending a message that American innovation and manufacturing will not be bullied out of existence without a fight.'
China and South Korea condemned the steep import tariffs and Europe also said on Tuesday it regretted the U.S. decision and would react 'firmly and proportionately' if EU exports were hit by the tariffs, which Asia fears could be be the start of greater protectionism and stall a revival in global trade.
Trump's actions on trade during his first year had been less alarming than many outside the United States had feared, but Louis Kuijs, head of Asia economics at consultancy Oxford Economics in Hong Kong, said this may now be changing.
'This could very well be just one step of many,' he said, adding that steel and aluminium were also on Washington's list.
Economists still believe the United States will avoid taking measures that could impact U.S. companies global supply chains, particularly for cars and electronics. 

The European Commission said it regretted the measures, had serious doubts that they met WTO conditions and would not hesitate to react if they harmed European Union exports.
German Finance Minister Peter Altmaier told reporters in Brussels that the EU opposed protectionism and said that the measures would make products more expensive for Americans.
China's Ministry of Industry and Information Technology (MIIT) said that the outlook for solar firms' expansion overseas was not good because of protectionist sentiment, and that China was encouraging firms to build factories overseas.
Other U.S. trading partners were also quick to react, with Mexico saying it would use legal means to ensure Washington met international obligations, pointing to compensation envisaged under the North American Free Trade Agreement.
India has recently re-opened a U.S. dispute, alleging Washington has failed to comply with a ruling on solar power, while Vietnam has challenged U.S. anti-dumping measures against exports of fish fillets.

Some analysts in Seoul believed Trump was stepping up pressure on the Asian ally to rely more on him when dealing with North Korea, while gaining leverage renegotiating a bilateral free trade pact he has previously labeled 'horrible'.
'Security and trade are linked to each other under Trump,' said Choi Won-mog, an international trade law expert at Ewha University.
A WTO filing published on Jan. 12 showed Seoul had already sought authorisation to impose annual trade sanctions worth at least $711 million on the United States, in response to the dispute over washing machines.
South Korea also asked for permission to impose an open-ended amount of trade sanctions if Washington broke the same rules again on other products.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Tue 23 Jan 2018, 21:08

So US companies like Apple or General Electric don't use parts which aren't produced outside of the States? And don't produce outside of the States themselves? Because otherwise the prices of their products will rise as well since these taxes need to be paid as well when their products are imported.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Wed 24 Jan 2018, 01:43

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5305011/Workaholic-Jeff-Zucker-wife-split-21-years.html

[size=34]'Workaholic' Jeff Zucker and his wife to split after 21 years just days after he sought to calm staff when a man threatened to gun down employees at CNN's Atlanta office because they are 'fake news'[/size]

  • Jeff Zucker, 52, and his wife, Caryn, confirmed with Page Six that things were over between them romantically as friends adding that the two 'grew apart' 

  • 'It can't be easy being married to Jeff — he is a workaholic, and is obsessed with news, and obsessed with being the best,' said a source close to the couple 

  • But for the sake of their four children, the couple plans to remain cordial

  • 'Together, we have made the difficult decision to separate, but do so as friends committed to our kids. They remain our sole focus,' the couple said 

  • The CNN Worldwide president has been under lots of pressure from President Donald Trump and conservative media, according to sources

  • Zucker, however, commented that the animosity from Trump have only 'emboldened' the network and boosted ratings 


By MATTHEW WRIGHT FOR DAILYMAIL.COM 
PUBLISHED: 19:04 EST, 23 January 2018 | UPDATED: 19:39 EST, 23 January 2018

    



CNN president Jeff Zucker and his wife have split after 21 years of marriage. 
Zucker, 52, and his wife, Caryn, confirmed with Page Six that things were over between them romantically as friends adding that the two 'grew apart'.
'It can't be easy being married to Jeff — he is a workaholic, and is obsessed with news, and obsessed with being the best,' said a source close to the couple.
'Caryn is much more laid back and social, spends a lot of time with their kids and enjoys being part of the Upper East Side social circuit.


+4


Jeff Zucker, 52, and his wife, Caryn, confirmed with Page Six that things were over between them romantically as friends adding that the two 'grew apart'
'They've had their problems over the years. Things have been bad for 10 years, but they have now accepted their marriage is over, and he has moved out of their apartment.'

But for the sake of their four children, the couple plans to remain cordial. 
'Together, we have made the difficult decision to separate, but do so as friends committed to our kids. They remain our sole focus,' the couple said in a joint statement. 


+4




+4



But for the sake of their four children, the couple plans to remain cordial. 'Together, we have made the difficult decision to separate, but do so as friends committed to our kids. They remain our sole focus,' the couple said
Jeff and Caryn Zucker met while working at NBC and wedded at the extravagant Pierre Hotel in 1996. 
At the time, Zucker was the executive producer of NBC's 'Today' while his wife was the supervisor at 'Saturday Night Live.'

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The CNN Worldwide president has been under lots of pressure from President Donald Trump and conservative media, according to sources. 
Zucker, however, commented that the animosity from Trump have only 'emboldened' the network and boosted ratings. 


+4


Zucker commented that the animosity from Trump have only 'emboldened' the network and boosted ratings
While working at NBC, he teamed up with Katie Couric and the disgraced Matt Lauer to build the 'Today' show up. Zucker would work with Couric again but then beef between the two helped prompt his move to CNN. 
In an interview with New York Magazinein 2014, he shared that he was hoping to move pass the television industry. 
'I'd like to run a professional football team,' he said. 
'I'd love to run the USTA [United States Tennis Association], be the sports editor of the New York Times. Would I consider a run for political office? Yes.' 
He continued, stating that it was a 'reasonable assumption' that CNN was his last job on TV.
Today, Zucker may have his sights on ESPN's president job following the sudden resignation of John Skipper.
Page Six reported that Disney's CEO Bob Iger called Zucker to discuss the move. 
'Jeff loves his job at CNN and has no interest in running ESPN,' said a CNN spokesperson, last week.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by What Would He Say on Thu 25 Jan 2018, 00:08

No sign of UknowWho...
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Thu 25 Jan 2018, 18:39

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5312843/Trump-bashes-Palestinians-disrespecting-Pence.html

[size=34]Trump bashes Palestinians for 'disrespecting' Pence, saying U.S. aid will get taken away if they don't negotiate peace[/size]

  • President Trump went after the Palestinian government for showing 'disrespect'

  • He spoke next to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Davos 

  • The complained that the PA didn't allow Vice President Pence to visit on his Middle East trip

  • Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas met with EU leaders in Europe instead

  • Pence delayed his trip amid fury over Trump announcing plan to move the U.S. embassy to Jerusalem 

  • Trump said Jerusalem is now 'off the table'

  • He said the Palestinians won't get U.S. aide unless they negotiate peace 


By GEOFF EARLE, DEPUTY U.S. POLITICAL EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 11:28 EST, 25 January 2018 | UPDATED: 13:17 EST, 25 January 2018

    

President Donald Trump blasted the Palestinian leadership for showing 'disrespect' to the U.S. and threatened to pull back U.S. aide unless they negotiate peace.
Trump hailed Israel as a loyal ally, then tore into the Palestinians while seated next to Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Davos.
He complained that the U.S. gives 'billions of dollars' to countries that turn around and 'vote against us.'
He the tore into the Palestinian leadership for turning back Vice President Mike Pence on his trip to the Middle East that concluded this week. That trip got delayed amid fury over Trump's announcement that he will move the U.S. embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.


+7


President Donald Trump said aid to the Palestinians was 'on the table' and could get taken away
Scroll down for video 

He complained about 'when they disrespected us a week ago by not allowing our great vice president to see them and we give them and we give them hundreds of millions of dollars in aid and support.'
Pence met with Netanyahu when he visited the region.  Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas instead flew to Europe to meet with EU leaders in Europe in an apparent snub.
During his visit, the  European Union gave assurances that it backed his plan to have East Jerusalem as capital of a Palestinian state – rejecting Trump's move.

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Trump said Thursday of the aid that goes to the Palestinians: 'That money is on the table. That money is not going to them unless they sit down and negotiate peace.'
'Because I can tell you that Israel does want to make peace. And they're going to have to want to make peace and they're going to want to make peace or we're going to have nothing to do with it any longer. This was never brought up by other negotiations, but it's brought up by me.

[size=18]Trump threatens to stop Palestinian aid over Pence 'disrespect'



[/size]



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President Donald Trump shakes hands with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland January 25, 2018


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President Donald Trump shakes hands with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland January 25, 2018


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Vice President Mike Pence visits the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest prayer site, in Jerusalem's Old City January 23, 2018


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Palestinians clash with Israeli troops following a protest against a U.S. President Mike Pence protest visit to Israel, in the West Bank city of Ramallah, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2018


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U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, National Security advisor Herbert Raymond McMaster, Senior Advisor Jared Kushner and assistant for economic policy Gary Cohn attend U.S. President Donald Trump's and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's meeting during the World Economic Forum (WEF) annual meeting in Davo
Trump also threatened the U.S. would have 'nothing to do' with the peace process if the Palestinians don't cooperate.
'That money is on the table. That money is not going to them unless they sit down and negotiate peace. Because I can tell you that Israel does want to make peace,' Trump said.
'And they're going to have to want to make peace and they're going to want to make peace or we're going to have nothing to do with it any longer. This was never brought up by other negotiations, but it's brought up by me,' the president said.
He also defended his decision on Jerusalem.
'We took Jerusalem off the table. So we don't have to talk about it any more. They never got past Jerusalem.'


+7


'So we'll see what happens to the peace process. But respect has to be shown to the U.S.,' Trump said
He again cast the issue in terms of respect. 'So we'll see what happens to the peace process. But respect has to be shown to the U.S.,' Trump said.
Trump was accompanied on the trip by son in law Jared Kushner, who has made Middle East peace a priority.
Hours later, UN ambassador Nikki Haley tore into Abbas, comparing him unfavorably to the late Egyptian leader Anwar Sadat, who helped make peace with Israel.
By contrast, she said of Abbas 'He insulted the American president' in a recent speech. 
'I ask here today: Where is the Palestinian president? Where is the Palestinian 'King Hussein'? Where is the Palestinian 'Anwar Sadat'? If President Abbas can demonstrate he can be that leader, we would welcome it. His recent actions demonstrate the total opposite.'
Abbas blasted Trump in a rambling 2 1/2 speech Sunday.  'Since when did we reject negotiations?' he said. 'Shame.' He called Trump's decision a 'slap in the face' and vowed to 'slap back,' ABC News reported.
As with British Prime Minister Theresa May, Trump cast his rapport with Netanyahu in personal terms.
'We've developed a great relationship' as countries, Trump said. 'I can honestly say that and also as personal friends.'

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Thu 25 Jan 2018, 23:47

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5314221/Trump-offer-citizenship-1-8-MILLION-Dreamers.html

[size=34]BREAKING NEWS: Trump will offer citizenship to 1.8 MILLION 'Dreamers' – more than twice the number Obama protected under DACA – as he pushes for $25 billion to build his border wall[/size]

  • President Donald Trump's immigration compromise will expand protections for so-called DREAMers to include citizenship options for 1.8 million of them

  • That number is more than 1 million higher than the total of young illegal immigrants protected by Barack Obama's DACA program

  • The dramatic concession to Democrats will extend the nation's broad arms around everyone who was eligible for DACA but didn't apply

  • Trump wants $25 billion in congressional funding for his border wall and other border security enhancements

  • Trump aides say the funding is non-negotiable, and 'he's not about to bend on the wall, and that's going to take a multi-year appropriation from Congress'

  • The White House will release a 'legislative framework' for an immigration deal on Monday, a day before the president's State of the Union Address


By DAVID MARTOSKO, US POLITICAL EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM 
PUBLISHED: 17:46 EST, 25 January 2018 | UPDATED: 18:42 EST, 25 January 2018

    


President Donald Trump is prepared to provide a pathway to citizenship for more than 1.8 million illegal immigrants who were brought to the country as children, the White House told aides to Republican members of Congress on Thursday.
That's more than twice the number of people already protected from deportation by the Obama-era 'Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals' (DACA) program.
The larger concession in the midst of a contentious immigration policy fight would go far further than Obama ever did, extending the nation's broad arms around nearly everyone who was eligible for DACA status but never applied – and welcoming others whose qualifications had been on the margins.
In exchange, White House senior domestic policy adviser Stephen Miller told lawmakers, Trump expects $25 billion in guaranteed funding for his U.S.-Mexico border wall and other border security enhancements – including some on the U.A.-Canadian border.

The result, Miller said, is 'a compromise position that we believe ... will get 60 votes in the Senate,' and 'ultimately will lead to passage of a law.'


+10



President Donald Trump is set to extend a citizenship path to 1.8 million young illegal immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children, a dramatic concession on immigration that's more than twice as generous as Barack Obama's 'DACA' program


+10



In exchange for welcoming more than 1 million people who qualified for DACA but never applied, Trump aims to squeeze $25 billion out of Congress to build his border wall between the U.S. and Mexico


+10


Jill Carlson, a member of Columbia County Indivisible, held a sign on Thursday expressing her views on DACA outside Congressman Louis Barletta's local office in Hazleton, Pennsylvania


+10


President Barack Obama introduced the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program in 2012, a plan that protected more than 700,000 illegal immigrants from deportation – and instead of rolling it back, Trump is willing to dramatically expand it
The conference call was held with the condition that Miller would be identified only as a nameless 'senior administration official,' but an NBC reporter and several congressional aides broke that embargo as soon as the call was concluded.
Two senior GOP aides confirmed that Miller delivered the news from the White House.
Trump has previously ruled out the idea of allowing DACA recipients to walk a pathway toward full equality in the United States, saying in September that he was 'not looking at amnesty. We're looking at allowing people to stay here.'
The border wall was among Trump's most loudly touted and oft-repeated campaign promises.
In keeping with precedent on Capitol Hill, the White House is calling the $25 billion cash infusion a 'trust fund' that the Department of Homeland Security could spend on border protection – and that Congress can't divert for other purposes.
Trump's larger immigration reform proposal also includes a plan to limit 'chain migration,' the legal sponsorship of visas by extended family members who already have legal residency status.
Currently practically unlimited across two generations of family members, the policy would shrink eligibility to immediate family members – spouses and minor children.
Trump's package would also put an end to a 'diversity visa lottery' system that recruits legal immigrants – largely at random – on the sole basis of their countries of origin.
Started in 1999, the program's intent was to allow people to enter the United States who were from nations typically 'underrepresented' among the domestic population.
Trump has seized on the lottery as the root cause of death and destruction, citing a man who entered the U.S. under its umbrella and then was accused of plowing a truck through a crowd of New York City pedestrians and cyclists, killing eight.


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Pro-DACA protesters are a common sight on Capitol Hill, and at the White House, including this group egged on by Illinois Democratic Senator Dick Durbin on Sunday –  but it may be a Republican president who answers their pleas



32-year-old Trump immigration hardliner Stephen Miller 'led the briefing,' according to an NBC reporter who – like many on Capitol Hill – dispensed with the usual artifice of anonymity and identified the aide who delivered the news from the White House


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Illegal immigrants and their supporters demonstrated last year in front of the White House after Trump said he would end DACA unless Congress acted to save it

[size=10][size=18]Trump says won't sign DACA bill without border wall funding




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The expanded citizenship allowance for so-called 'DREAMers' matches exactly a plank in a comprehensive reform proposal promoted by a 'Gang of Six' senators, led by Republicans Lindsey Graham and Jeff Flake, and Democrat Dick Durbin.
White House press secretary Sarah Sanders said Wednesday that their overall package was unacceptable to the president and should be considered 'dead on arrival.'
That Gang of Six proposal would have offered an amnesty to about 3 million people who fit loosely under the definition of 'DREAMers,' leaning in the direction of Democrats who aim to wrap as many illegal immigrants as possible into a potential amnesty.
Republicans, on the other hand, have traditionally focused on border security. 
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a noncommittal statement after the conference call that he hoped both Republicans and Democrats 'will look to this framework for guidance as they work towards an agreement.'
Trump leapt back into the immigration debate Wednesday afternoon before jetting off to the World economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, telling reporters in an impromptu meeting that he would support citizenship for DACA recipients 'over a period of 10 to 12 years.'
Miller on Thursday told congressional aides that this represented 'the most substantial concession' the White House would offer to Democrats.

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'The president has indicated a willingness to extend citizenship to 1.8 million individuals as part of this immigration reform package,' he said.
'That would be the DACA population, plus individuals who failed to apply for DACA but otherwise met the requirements, as well as adjustments in time-frame that would bring the total maximum population size to 1.8 million.'
Reactions among Republicans in Congress were mixed.
One senior GOP aide who was on the call told DailyMail.com: 'If he can actually push this across the finish line, it will change everything Americans thought they knew about immigrants and immigration, and Republicans will be the team that actually pulled off the Hail Mary.'
Another GOP aide offered a taunt to Chuck Schumer, the leader of Democrats in the Senate: 'Moral high ground, seized. Your move, Chuck.'
Politico reporter, though, heard a different tune.
'This is the beginning of the end of the GOP majority in the House,' a Republican congressman told the journalist. 'In a year when the Democrats impeach Trump, we can point to this moment.'


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Conservative Arkansas Republican Sen. Tom Cotton signaled that right-wingers might move toward Trump's position, calling his proposal 'generous and humane' as well as 'responsible'


+10


BALL IN YOUR COURT: Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer says he offered Trump his $25 billion last week before the government shutdown as an inducement to make DACA permanent, but now Trump has made him a counter offer that's far more ambitious
Heritage Action, a conservative political committee, said in a statement that it wouldn't support 'any proposal that expands the amnesty-eligible population.'
Trump's proposal 'risks opening Pandora's box,' the group said, and 'should be a non-starter.'
But Sen. Tom Cotton, a conservative from Arkansas, signaled that congressional right-wingers could warm to the White House's approach. 
'The president's framework is generous and humane, while also being responsible,' Cotton said in a statement. 'It protects those eligible for DACA, who are here through no fault of their own. But it also will prevent us from ending up back here in five years by securing the border and putting an end to extended-family chain migration.'
'The president's willingness to grandfather everyone in the current immigrant backlog also shows he’s serious about reaching a bipartisan solution,' he added.
The White House expects to publicly unveil its proposal on Monday, a day before Trump delivers his first State of the Union Address. 
A White House aide told DailyMail.com on Thursday that funding for Trump's wall is non-negotiable.
'You've been covering him long enough,' the aide said. 'You know he's not about to bend on the wall. And that's going to take a multi-year appropriation from Congress.'

[size=18]'Everybody's on board': Trump promised DACA deal in September



[/size]




Prototype U.S.-Mexico border walls were erected in San Diego, California last October, ready for evaluation and funding – if Trump can wheedle the money out of Congress


+10


White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders this week told people brought to the U.S. as minors – the illegal immigrants protected by DACA – that 'they should storm Capitol Hill and protest there' in order to force lawmakers to embrace a compromise that would help them
One aide familiar with Trump's thinking said Wednesday DACA recipients put into a citizenship queue would be vetted along the line of the requirement of a 'conservative DREAM Act' proposed last September by North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis and other Republicans.
A rigorous background check would be mandatory, including biometric data and criminal database searches. Citizens-to-be under the proposal would also have to pay off any federal tax liabilities they have, and acknowledge that their immigration status can be terminated if they were convicted of a crime while they were protected by DACA.    
The Tillis bill mentioned by the aide also called for a renewed background check at the five-year mark, and then another one when citizenship papers are finally submitted. 
Other requirements would likely include earning a high school diploma, and then maintaining their 'conditional' status – and a green card – by either holding down a steady job, serving in the military, or graduating from college. 
On Monday, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders urged people brought to the U.S. as minors – the illegal immigrants protected by DACA – to 'storm Capitol Hill and protest there' in order to force lawmakers to embrace a compromise that would help them.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Fri 26 Jan 2018, 15:02

If everyone in the US had to meet those so-called "standards" in the Tillis bill there would be no one left in the US! And wouldn't Trump just love it if the Dreamers all stormed Capitol Hill. It would make it so much easier for ICE to round them all up if they were all in one place.

And in case no one noticed, they tied this generous offer to a payment of $25 billion for Trump's damned border wall.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Fri 26 Jan 2018, 15:15

The whole thing is ridiculous he is using blackmail and ruining people's lives for a damn wall. We have homeless
people everywhere people with no jobs. People who can't afford food and this idiot wants to spend $25 billion on a wall.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Mon 29 Jan 2018, 14:43

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5324917/EU-stands-ready-hit-Trump-imposes-unfair-trade-measures.html

[size=34]EU warn they will react 'swiftly' to any Trump trade curbs as Brussels reacts to President's Brexit comments during Piers Morgan interview[/size]

  • EU responded to threat made by President Donald Trump during interview

  • Spokesman said EU would react 'swiftly and appropriately' to any measures

  • President Trump claimed the 28-nation union is not 'what it's supposed to be' 

  • He accused EU of 'treating the US very unfairly' in Piers Morgan interview 


By SARA MALM FOR MAILONLINE and PRESS ASSOCIATION and AFP
PUBLISHED: 06:48 EST, 29 January 2018 UPDATED: 08:06 EST, 29 January 2018



     

     

     

     
  • [email=?subject=Read%20this:%20EU%20warn%20they%20will%20react%20%27swiftly%27%20to%20any%20Trump%20trade%20curbs%20as%20Brussels%20reacts%20to%20President%27s%20Brexit%20comments%20during%20Piers%20Morgan%20interview&body=EU%20warn%20they%20will%20react%20%27swiftly%27%20to%20any%20Trump%20trade%20curbs%20as%20Brussels%20reacts%20to%20President%27s%20Brexit%20comments%20during%20Piers%20Morgan%20interview%0A%0AUS%20President%20Donald%20Trump%20said%20in%20his%20interview%20with%20Piers%20Morgan%20yesterday%20that%20he%20was%20annoyed%20with%20EU%20trade%20policy%2C%20claiming%20the%20US%20cannot%20sufficiently%20export%20to%20the%2028-nation%20bloc.%0A%0Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailymail.co.uk%2Fnews%2Farticle-5324917%2FEU-stands-ready-hit-Trump-imposes-unfair-trade-measures.html%3Fito%3Demail_share_article-top%0A%0A%0AMost%20Read%20Articles%3A%0A%0AKesha%20leads%20%23TimesUp%20Grammys%20protest%20and%20reduces%20audience%20to%20tears%20with%20emotional%20performance%20about%20her%20alleged%20rape%20at%20the%20hands%20of%20producer%20Dr%20Luke%20as%20stars%20wear%20symbolic%20white%20roses%C2%A0%0Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailymail.co.uk%2Fnews%2Farticle-5323069%2FStars-wearing-white-roses-Grammy-Awards.html%3Fito%3Demail_share_article-top_most-read-articles%0A%0AREVEALED%3A%20%27The%20Wonder%20Years%27%20star%20Fred%20Savage%20was%20accused%20of%20sexually%20harassing%20his%20costume%20designer%20when%20he%20was%2016%20and%20the%20popular%20show%20had%20to%20be%20pulled%20off%20the%20air%0Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailymail.co.uk%2Fnews%2Farticle-5323371%2FFred-Savage-accused-sexual-harassment-16.html%3Fito%3Demail_share_article-top_most-read-articles%0A%0AMoment%20Instagram%20fitness%20model%20Jen%20Selter%2C%2024%2C%20is%20removed%20from%20an%20American%20Airlines%20flight%20by%20cops%20after%20arguing%20with%20a%20fight%20attendant%0Ahttp%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailymail.co.uk%2Fnews%2Farticle-5322765%2FInstagram-model-Jen-Selter-kicked-AA-flight.html%3Fito%3Demail_share_article-top_most-read-articles%0A%0A]e-mail[/email]
     




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The European Union has said that if US president Donald Trump initiates unfair trade measures against the 28-nation bloc, it would react 'swiftly and appropriately'.
Trump said in his interview with Piers Morgan yesterday that he was annoyed with EU trade policy, claiming  the US cannot sufficiently export to the union.
He said his problems with the EU 'may morph into something very big' from a trade standpoint.


+2


Peeved: US President Donald Trump said in his interview with Piers Morgan yesterday that he was annoyed with EU trade policy 
EU spokesman Margaritis Schinas retorted that 'while trade has to be open and fair, it also has to be rules-based'.

Mr Schinas added: 'The EU stands ready to react swiftly and appropriately in case our exports are affected by any restrictive trade measure from the United States.' 

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Trump made the comments as he told Piers Morgan his views on the Brexit negotiations, criticizing the way Prime Minister Theresa May had been negotiating Britain's way out of the EU.   
'I think I would have negotiated it differently. I would have had a different attitude,' he told Morgan.
'I think I would have said that the European Union is not cracked up to what it's supposed to be. 


+2


Critique: Trump told Morgan that had he been in Prime Minister Theresa May's shoes, he would be negotiating Brexit differently 
'And I would have taken a tougher stand in getting out. You know, I have a lot of problems with the European Union. I'm representing the United States, it's a very unfair situation. We cannot get our product in. It's very, very tough.
'And yet they send their product to us – no taxes, very little taxes. It's very unfair.
'I've had a lot of problems with European Union, and it may morph into something very big from that standpoint, from a trade standpoint. The European Union has treated the United States very unfairly when it comes to trade.
'They're not the only one, by the way. I could name many countries and places that do. But the European Union has been very, very unfair to the United States. And I think it will turn out to be very much to their detriment.' 
Trump gave the wide-ranging interview last Thursday on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in Davos, where he took his 'America First' agenda to the global business elite.
In a speech Friday he told the forum that his mantra 'does not mean America alone' and hinted that the US could rejoin the Trans-Pacific Partnership, a deal he withdrew from a year ago.
But earlier this month the Trump Administration imposed steep tariffs on imported washing machines and solar panels.
Last year it vowed to impose nearly 300 percent punitive tariffs on airplanes manufactured by Canada's Bombardier.
A bipartisan US trade panel blocked that decision on Friday but the dispute, which has inflamed relations with Ottawa -- and to a lesser degree Britain, where Bombardier has a large workforce -- could be a harbinger for the EU.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Mon 29 Jan 2018, 17:00

Yes, we don't have any US products in the EU. Never heard of Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, netflix, Goldman Sachs, Disney, Bourbon, Harley Davidson, ... Rolling Eyes
He seems to think that the global industry and trade just works to serve the US industry, ignoring the fact that there are nearly 200 other countries on this planet with industries and people who want to make a living as well.
Trade isn't a one-way-road...
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Mon 29 Jan 2018, 18:31

carolhathaway wrote:Yes, we don't have any US products in the EU. Never heard of Apple, Amazon, Microsoft, netflix, Goldman Sachs, Disney, Bourbon, Harley Davidson, ... Rolling Eyes
Sorry,
I forgot to mention Boeing, google / alphabet, Coca Cola, Pepsi, McDonalds, Burger King and Subway!
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 30 Jan 2018, 01:33

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5326999/US-lifts-ban-refugees-11-countries.html

[size=34]Trump's ban on refugees from 'high-risk' countries including Muslim-majority nations and North Korea is over says Homeland Security chief[/size]

  • Kirstjen Nielsen says the ban on refugees from 11 'high-risk' countries is over but claimed those seeking to enter the US would be under much tougher scrutiny

  • 'Risk-based' assessments will now be made as part of security measures against 'bad actors' from the countries, which were never officially named

  • Refugee groups say they were: Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Mali, North Korea, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria and Yemen

  • Senior administration official told journalists that the policy of enhanced security assessments for the 11 countries was not designed to target Muslims 


By AFP and REUTERS
PUBLISHED: 16:18 EST, 29 January 2018 | UPDATED: 19:52 EST, 29 January 2018

    


The United States announced Monday it was lifting its ban on refugees from 11 'high-risk' countries, but said those seeking to enter the US would come under much tougher scrutiny than in the past.
Applicants from 11 countries, unnamed but understood to include 10 Muslim-majority nations plus North Korea, will face tougher 'risk-based' assessments to be accepted.
'It's critically important that we know who is entering the United States,' said Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.
'These additional security measures will make it harder for bad actors to exploit our refugee program, and they will ensure we take a more risk-based approach to protecting the homeland.'


+3


End of the ban: An 11-country absolute ban on refugees put in place by the Trump administration is over. He hosted lunch for the United Nations Security Council, with U.S. Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley, just before the announcement was made by his Homeland Security secretary Kirstjen Nielsen 


+3


Contentious: There were protests outside the White House on Saturday marking a year since the first travel ban and protesting at later measures including the refugee ban 
The 11 countries, hit with a ban in October in the Trump administration's revised refugee policy, have not been identified officially.

But refugee groups say they comprise Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Mali, North Korea, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.
Speaking anonymously, a senior administration official told journalists that the policy of enhanced security assessments for the 11 countries was not designed to target Muslims.
'Our admissions have nothing to do with religion,' the official said, adding that there is 'nothing especially novel' about tougher screening for countries deemed to have a higher level of risk.
Donald Trump has pursued a much tougher stance on immigrants and refugees from all countries since becoming president one year ago.
Annual refugee admissions have been slashed by more than half to a maximum of 45,000 in fiscal 2018, which ends on September 31.
Nielsen said new security upgrades to the admissions program will help block suspected criminals from entering the United States from 'high-risk' countries, the head of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said on Monday.
'We will be rolling out new security measures for applicants from high-risk countries which will seek to prevent the program from being exploited by terrorists, criminals and fraudsters,' Nielsen said at a public event in Washington.
'These changes will not only improve security but importantly they will help us better assess legitimate refugees fleeing persecution.'
Nielsen did not give further details about the upgrade.

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+3


Country affected: Syria was one of the countries affected by the travel ban. At the weekend, Angelina Jolie visited a refugee camp for Syrians in Jordan

[size=18]Supreme Court dismissed Trump's travel ban in October




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Since taking office, President Donald Trump has slashed the number of refugees allowed into the country and paused the refugee program for four months last year. He has also instituted stricter vetting requirements and quit negotiations on a voluntary pact to deal with global migration.
In late October, the Trump administration effectively paused refugee admissions from 11 countries mostly in the Middle East and Africa, pending a 90-day security review which was set to expire last week.
The countries subject to the review are Egypt, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Mali, North Korea, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria and Yemen. It is unclear if these are the same 'high-risk' countries referred to by Nielsen.
For each of the last three years, refugees from the 11 countries made up more than 40 percent of U.S. admissions. But a Reuters review of State Department data shows that as the 90-day review went into effect, refugee admissions from the 11 countries plummeted.
On Dec. 23, a federal judge in Seattle partially blocked restrictions on admitting refugees from the 11 countries, saying the administration could carry out the 90-day review, but could not stop processing or admitting refugees from the 11 countries in the meantime, as long as those refugees had significant ties to the United States.
Since the judge's ruling, 23 refugees from the 11 countries have been allowed into the United States, according to State Department data.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 30 Jan 2018, 22:48

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5331771/Republican-Arrest-DREAMers-attending-State-Union.html

[size=34]Republican congressman demands Capitol police check IDs and arrest 'illegal aliens' at State of the Union address after dozens of lawmakers say they'll bring DREAMers as symbolic guests[/size]

  • Donald Trump will deliver his first State of the Union address Tuesday night

  • It's tradition for members of Congress to invite 'themed' guests as +1s

  • This year at least 23 Democrats and 1 Republican will attend with DREAMers

  • Arizona Republican Rep. Paul Gosar said he wants all of them arrested and deported when they show up with their tickets

  • Speaker Paul Ryan's spokeswoman says he 'does not agree' 

  • Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, who will not seek re-election, tweeted at Gosar: 'This is why we can’t have nice things'

  • Gosar shoved back, tweeting: 'This is why you got forced out of office'


By DAVID MARTOSKO, US POLITICAL EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM 
PUBLISHED: 15:30 EST, 30 January 2018 | UPDATED: 16:50 EST, 30 January 2018


        


A Republican congressman said Tuesday in advance of Donald Trump's State of the Union address that illegal immigrants invited as lawmakers' guests should be arrested at the door of the U.S. Capitol.
Rep. Paul Gosar, an Arizonan from the GOP's conservative wing, asked U.S. Capitol Police and Attorney General Jeff Sessions to check IDs at the door, according to his office.
Gosar wants authorities to 'consider checking identification of all attending the State of the Union address and arresting any illegal aliens in attendance,' a press release said.
'Additionally, Congressman Gosar asked that they arrest those using fraudulent social security numbers and identification to pass through security.'


+10



Republican Rep. Paul Gosar said Tuesday that 'DREAMers' – illegal immigrants brought to the U.S. as children – should be arrested on the spot when they arrive as symbolic congressional guests for President Donald Trump's State of the Union address


+10








Gosar, a right winger from Arizona, said all 'illegal aliens in attendance' should be arrested and deported, despite having official congressional invitations


+10


Trump will address a Joint Session of Congress on Tuesday night for his first official State of Union address after working for more than a year in office
Gosar said in a statement that '[o]f all the places where the Rule of Law needs to be enforced, it should be in the hallowed halls of Congress.'

'Any illegal aliens attempting to go through security, under any pretext of invitation or otherwise, should be arrested and deported.'
Gosar blasted out his demand in an email titled: 'Not in My House.' 
Fellow Republican Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida tweeted in response: 'Oh my goodness, Rep. Gosar. Dreamers don't pose a threat to us. This is so drastic and cruel. Dios mío.'
Ros-Lehtinen, a moderate who emigrated from Cuba, will retire next January.
Arizona Sen. Jeff Flake, another planned retiree, tweeted at Gosar: 'This is why we can’t have nice things...'
Gosar shoved back, tweeting: 'This is why you got forced out of office.' 
Capitol Police did not respond to a request for comment.
But House Speaker Paul Ryan's spokeswoman AshLee Strong said in a statement: 'The speaker clearly does not agree' with Gosar.
At least two dozen immigrants who came to the United States illegally as children will look down on the president from the House Gallery as he speaks Tuesday night.


+10


ARREST HIM? Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo invited DACA recipient Adrian Escarate (left), who was brought to the U.S. from Chile when he was 3, to Tuesday night's State of the Union address


+10


CUFF HER? Nicolle Uria of Virginia will be Democratic Rep. Gerry Connolly's guest on Tuesday night



Fellow Republican Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida tweeted in response: 'Oh my goodness, Rep. Gosar. Dreamers don't pose a threat to us. This is so drastic and cruel. Dios mío'


+10


Gosar is fighting against the tide of his colleagues who will stock the House Gallery with at least two dozen DREAMers on Tuesday night
As of Friday, twenty-three Democratic members of Congress had invited so-called 'DREAMers' as their guests, according to a list provided by a congressional aide.
One Republican has followed suit.
The White House's blueprint for immigration reform includes a pathway to citizenship for 1.8 million people who qualified for the Obama-era Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, whether or not they applied and enjoyed its protections.
Democratic partisans say the price the White House wants for that amnesty is too high.
Trump is demanding $25 billion to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico, an end to the 'diversity' visa lottery system and strict limits on chain migration, which allows green card holders to sponsor extended-family members for visas.
DACA is set to expire on March 5 unless Congress cuts a deal by then. Separately, a February 8 deadline looms for Congress to fund the federal government; Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has pledged to bring a DACA fix to the Senate floor by then.






Moderate Arizona Republican Sen. Jeff Flake clobbered Gosar, saying: 'This is why we can't have nice things' – and Gosar fired back with a jab about his retirement


+10


DEPORT HER? Democratic Rep. Scott Peters told San Diego 'DREAMer' Karen Bahena that she will be his State of the Union guest


+10


The deluge of illegal immigrants on Capitol Hill comes at the height of negotiations over the status of hundreds of thousands of DACA recipients
House Democrat Scott Peters said he was 'honored' to have Karen Bahena, who was brought by her parents from Mexico to California in 2001 when she was eight years old, as his guest to Trump's speech.
Bahena, protected by the previous administration's deferred action that is set to expire on March 5 absent a fix by Congress, graduated from San Diego State University and aspires to be a nurse.
'Outstanding contributors to society like Karen should not be forced out of our country,' Peters said in a statement. 'Instead, they should be embraced and celebrated for making the United States a better place.'
Virginia high school student Nicolle Uria, who was brought to the U.S. as a 1-year-old, will be the guest of Virginia Democratic Rep. Gerry Connolly.


+10



READ HIM HIS RIGHTS? Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin, the Senate's No. 2 Democrat, said his guest Cesar Montelongo (pictured) was the first DACA recipient enrolled in the MD-PhD program at Loyola University Chicago's medical school


+10


The State of the Union speech is an annual event that brings the President of the United States to the opposite end of Pennsylvania Avenue from the White House to speak to a Joint Session Of Congress
'This country is all she has ever known,' Connolly said, 'and through her volunteer work she has made our community better.'
New York Democrat Nita Lowey invited Hugo Alexander Acosta Mazariego, another DACA recipient, to use her extra ticket on Tuesday.
'I want to be clear: DREAMers are Americans,' Lowey said. 'They contribute to our economy, our communities and our strength and stability as a nation.'
Mazariego came to the U.S. from El Salvador at age 15 and works for Apple.
Illinois Sen. Dick Durbin, the Senate's No. 2 Democrat, said his guest Cesar Montelongo was the first DACA recipient enrolled in the MD-PhD program at Loyola University Chicago's medical school.
'I hope Cesar's presence reminds President Trump what's at stake in the debate over DACA: the lives of hundreds of thousands of innocent young people who want to contribute to our country’s future,' Durbin said.

[size=10][size=18]Trump says won't sign DACA bill without border wall funding




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North Dakota Republican Rep. Kevin Cramer took a different route to registering an immigration opinion on State of the Union night.
Cramer's guest, Tommy Fisher, is president of a company that was given a contract to develop a wall prototype for Trump's giant public works project.
'As Congress develops comprehensive immigrant enforcement legislation, I am proud to know a North Dakota company is a finalist to construct the border wall between our nation and Mexico,' Cramer said Friday.
Florida Rep. Carlos Curbelo is the only Republican lawmaker bringing a DACA recipient as his State of the Union guest.
Curbelo is running for re-election this year in a district that Hillary Clinton won handily in the 2016 presidential election.
He shared his spare ticket with Adrian Escarate, a DACA recipient who was brought to the U.S. from Chile when he was 3.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Thu 01 Feb 2018, 18:55

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5341019/Trump-declassify-explosive-memo-send-Intel-Friday.html

[size=34]BREAKING NEWS: Trump will declassify explosive memo and send it back to Congress Friday for release despite FBI's 'grave concerns' about putting it out[/size]

  • The top Democrat on the House intelligence committee says a vote earlier this week to release a classified memo to the public is invalid 

  • California Rep. Adam Schiff sent a letter to committee chairman Devin Nunes late Wednesday that charged the document had been 'secretly altered' 

  • Schiff says Republicans changed part of the document before sending it to the White House for review

  • President Trump is expected to approve the release today

  • He will declassify the memo and then send it to the House Intelligence panel for release Friday morning, Fox News reported

  • Has accepted some redactions, according to the Washington post 

  • Says it was 'secretly altered' 

  • The panel voted Monday to publicly release the memo, part of a GOP effort to prove improper use of surveillance by the FBI in its Russia investigation 

  • FBI expressed 'grave concerns' about its release 

  • House Intelligence Committee Republicans don't want the White House to block the public release of a classified memo they voted to share with the public

  • Memo reportedly outlines how a wiretap warrant was obtained partly on the basis of the anti-Trump 'dirty dossier' funded by Democrats in 2016 

  • Team Nunes said the edits were 'minor' and included two changes sought by the FBI 

  • Trump reportedly telling friends the memo will help discredit Russia probe 


By GEOFF EARLE, DEPUTY U.S. POLITICAL EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 12:02 EST, 1 February 2018 | UPDATED: 13:17 EST, 1 February 2018

    


President Donald Trump is expected Thursday to green light the release of an explosive classified memo despite the 'grave concerns' raised by the FBI and complaints from the top Democrat on the House Intelligence Committee.
Trump will use his authority as president to declassify the memo and then send it to the House Intelligence panel for release Friday morning, Fox News reported.
The Washington Post reported that Trump was expected to approve the release Thursday, having agreed to some redactions urged by the FBI. 
By putting out the memo, Trump is brushing aside the opposition of his FBI Director, Christopher Wray, whose bureau released an extraordinary public statement opposing its release. The Director of National Intelligence also reviewed the classified document during the review of over redactions.

Democrats on the Intelligence panel, who were thwarted in their effort to release a point-by-point rebuttal document, blasted the memo as cherry picking data. The document purports to show bias in the FBI that could have infected the Russia probe of Trump associates. 
The White House had yet to release any official statement on putting out the document.  President Trump flew to West Virginia Thursday, where he will address House Republicans.


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California Rep. Adam Schiff (right) sent a letter to House intelligence committee chairman Devin Nunes (left) late Wednesday that charged the memo containing classified information about supposed surveillance of the Trump campaign was 'altered' by Republicans
A White House official confirmed that the president has read the contentious memo.
There was continued fury and infighting in Washington Wednesday over the expected release of the memo – as theGOP Intelligence Committee chair admitted making changes before sending it to President Trump.
Following a party-line vote at the Intelligence panel, Trump is reviewing the memo – with White House sources indicating it could get the green light for release as soon as today.
But the timetable was thrown into uncertainty last night when ranking Democrat Adam Schiff of California blasted the release – and revealed that the panel majority had made changes to the document after a vote to release it and before sending ti to the White House.
A spokesman for Intelligence chairman Rep. Devin Nunes of California said Democrats were 'complaining about minor edits to the memo, including grammatical fixes and two edits requested by the FBI and by the minority themselves.


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President Trump flew to West Virginia Thursday, where he will address House Republicans
Nunes spokesman Jack Langer said the vote allowing release was 'procedurally sound,' and 'to suggest otherwise is a bizarre distraction from the abuses detailed in the memo, which the public will hopefully soon be able to read for themselves.'
Trump has already indicated he favors release of the memo – despite extraordinary public pushback by the FBI and internal lobbying by his own Justice Department.
Trump has told friends he believes release of the controversial memo will reveal bias in the FBI and could help discredit the Russia probe, CNN reported.
'The president has been really, really adamant about wanting this to come out ... He wants it out. Full stop,' an administration source told Axios.
Schiff, the top Democrat on the House intelligence committee says a vote earlier this week to release a classified memo to the public is invalid because Republicans changed part of the document before sending it to the White House for review.
Schiff sent a letter to House intelligence committee chairman Devin Nunes late Wednesday that charged the document had been 'secretly altered' by Nunes after the vote.


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Former CIA director John Brennan retweeted a posting by Schiff that the memo release could lead to another 'Saturday Night Massacre,' a reference to a Watergate purge.
'I had many fights with Congressional Dems over the years on national security matters,' Brennan wrote. 'But I never witnessed the type of reckless partisan behavior I am now seeing from Nunes and House Republicans. Absence of moral and ethical leadership in WH is fueling this government crisis.'
Nunes blasted the opposition put forward by the FBI.
'It’s clear that top officials used unverified information in a court document to fuel a counterintelligence investigation during an American political campaign,' he said in a statement as the blowup over the document escalated Wednesday.
The Intelligence panel voted Monday to publicly release the memo, part of a GOP effort to prove improper use of surveillance by the FBI in its Russia investigation.
President Trump has five days from the vote to review the document.
Senate Minority Chuck Schumer, the Democrat from New York, blasted Nunes late Wednesday.


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Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), Chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, walks away from a meeting with House GOP members, on Capitol Hill January 30, 2018 in Washington, DC
The top Democrat on the House intelligence committee says a vote earlier this week to release a classified memo to the public is invalid because Republicans changed part of the document before sending it to the White House for review. 
Schiff sent a letter to House intelligence committee chairman Devin Nunes late Wednesday that charged the document had been 'secretly altered' by Nunes after the vote.
Schiff did not detail the changes. 
A spokesman for Nunes did not immediately return a request for comment.
The panel voted Monday to publicly release the memo, part of a GOP effort to prove improper use of surveillance by the FBI in its Russia investigation. 
President Donald Trump has five days from the vote to review the document.
Senate Minority Chuck Schumer, the Democrat from New York, blasted Nunes late Wednesday.


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The FBI has expressed 'grave concerns' about its release


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President Trump has told friends release of the memo will help discredit Russia probe
Schumer accused Nunes of trying to undermine the rule of law by attempting to 'interfere with the Russia probe.' 
'It’s clear that Chairman Nunes will seemingly stop at nothing to undermine the rule of law and interfere with the Russia probe. He’s been willing to carry the White House’s water, attack our law enforcement and intelligence officials, and now to mislead his House colleagues,' Schumer wrote in a statement. 
Schumer called on House Speaker Paul Ryan, the Wisconsin Republican, to challenge Nunes and the other Republican members of the House Intelligence Committee.
'If Speaker Ryan cares about the integrity of the House or the rule of law, he will put an end to this charade once and for all,' Schumer said.
His comments were reported by The Hill
White House chief of staff John Kelly said Wednesday that the public will soon see the classified memo that reportedly spells out election year surveillance abuses by the Obama administration.
The memo, which the House Intelligence Committee has voted along party lines to release, outlines wrongdoing by the FBI in its investigation of alleged collusion by the Trump campaign and Russian agents. 
'It will be released here pretty quick, I think, and the whole world can see it,' Kelly said Wednesday of the document, compiled by Nunes.
Kelly appeared on Fox News Radio's 'The Brian Kilmeade Show.'

Trump told a GOP congressman after Tuesday night's State of the Union Address that he is '100 per cent ' in favor of releasing the memo.


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White House Chief of Staff John Kelly, pictured during Tuesday's State of the Union address, said Wednesday on Fox News Radio that the controversial classified intelligence memo will be 'released pretty quick' by the White House


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President Donald Trump told South Carolina Republican Rep. Jeff Duncan on Tuesday night that he would '100 per cent' release the memo that Republicans want the public to see


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'Oh, yeah. Don't worry,' Trump told Duncan on his way out of the House chamber following his State of the Union address

It has generated open rhetorical warfare between committee Republicans and career officials at the FBI and Justice Department.

'Let's release the memo,' South Carolina Rep. Jeff Duncan told Trump on his way out of the House chamber, in video footage captured by C-SPAN.
'Oh, yeah. Don't worry. One hundred per cent,' Trump replied.
'Can you imagine that?' the president added, seeming to hint at a scenario where he would keep the memo secret. 
'You'd be too angry.'
It's unclear whether the memo will live up to its hype; Kelly said he would 'let all the experts decide that when it's released.'
'This president wants everything out so the American people can make up their own minds.'
The memo came to the White House on Monday, he said, and 'we have our national security lawyers ... slicing and dicing and looking at it so they know what it means.'
In a remarkably public clash of wills with the White House, the FBI declared Wednesday it has 'grave concerns' about the accuracy of the classified memo.
The FBI's short and sharp statement, its first on the issue, laid bare a Trump administration conflict that had previously played out mostly behind closed doors in meetings between top Justice Department and White House officials.
'As expressed during our initial review, we have grave concerns about material omissions of fact that fundamentally impact the memo's accuracy,' the FBI said.
Trump has until Saturday to decide whether to block the memo's exposure after the Intelligence Committee voted along party lines to release it to the public.
The White House has pledged to conduct a legal and national security review before making a decision.
The memo reportedly shows that the FBI and DOJ improperly applied for wiretap warrants covering at least one member of the Trump campaign team.

[size=10][size=18]'100%' release the Nunes memo: Trump says on a hot-mic moment




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[size=35]38 shares[/size]


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Duncan, a conservative Republican, has come out in favor of releasing the memo in recent weeks
The warrant applications to a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act judge are thought to have been in part based on a notorious and uncorroborated anti-Trump 'dirty dossier' paid for by the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee. 
The dossier, compile by a former British spy, contained salacious and unproven claims, including one about Trump cavorting with prostitutes in a Moscow hotel and indulging in a 'golden showers' urine fetish. 

All members of Congress have been able to see the memo in a secure facility at the US Capitol. 
A Democratic memo offered in rebuttal could be released publicly, but only after the entire House of Representatives has a similar opportunity to review it. 
The White House said Monday that Trump had not decided whether to authorize the release of the memo, but said he favored 'full transparency.'
Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said at the time 'no one' at the White House had seen it yet, however.
She also confirmed Wednesday morning on CNN that Trump had yet to review it. 



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The memo is expected to spell out how Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein approved a request last spring for extended surveillance on Carter Page (pictured), an unpaid foreign policy adviser to Trump's presidential campaign


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White House aides have previously said Trump favored releasing the document, which is in contrast to the stance of the Justice Department
A number of conservatives favor releasing the memo, which they believe could discredit the findings of the investigation into ties between the Trump campaign and Russian officials.
White House aides have previously said Trump favored releasing the document, which is in contrast to the stance of the Justice Department.   
The New York Times reports that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein approved a request last spring for extended surveillance on Carter Page, an unpaid foreign policy adviser to Trump's presidential campaign.
Republicans appear poised to argue that Rosenstein did not thoroughly review the application to a FISA court.
Page is under scrutiny for a 2016 trip he made to Moscow where he met with Russian officials, but insists that he made it clear he was not representing the presidential candidate.
A report he provided to the campaign afterward with his insights and an offer to set up a trip to Russia for Trump has made him a person of interest in investigations into alleged collusion, however. 
Republicans have been teeing up their memo as a bombshell that will justify demands for an independent investigation of the DOJ and FBI, which had been conducting the Russia probe until Rosenstein hired Robert Mueller to serve as special counsel in the matter.
One outgrowth of the memo's public release could be a broader understanding of the low bar prosecutors must clear before being granted FISA wiretap warrants. 
Multiple media reports claim that less than one-tenth of one per cent of FISA court applications are turned down. 

[size=18]U.S. House GOP votes to release classified intelligence memo



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The Rosenstein-approved FISA court warrant application is thought to have relied at least in part on the 'dirty dossier' funded by Democrats against Trump in 2016
Schiff, the ranking Democrat on the committee, said last week that the GOP members had 'selectively and misleadingly' characterized classified information 'in an effort to protect the president at any cost.' 
In a Sunday morning appearance on CBS, White House Legislative Affairs Director Marc Short suggested Trump would lean toward releasing the four-page document.
'We haven't obviously read the memo. It's classified. So it's hard for me to speculate on what's in the memo,' he said. 
'I do think that we typically prefer transparency. And so if there are concerns that I think it would be helpful for Americans to know about, we would be open for that being released.'
Republican Sen. Susan Collins said Sunday that she was concerned that classified information would be compromised, however.
'That's a really serious matter. So, to me, the preferable way to handle the allegations of wrongdoing by certain FBI agents and a lawyer there is to leave it in the hands of the inspector general,' she told CNN.

annemarie
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Thu 01 Feb 2018, 23:00

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5341927/Michelle-Obama-Forget-theyre-saying-Washington.html

[size=34]Michelle Obama tells Ellen to 'forget what they're saying in Washington'[/size]

  • The former first lady appeared on the Ellen Degeneres show on Thursday 

  • During her appearance Mrs Obama sought to comfort Americans worried about Trump's administration 

  • While Americans differ politically, Mrs Obama said that we still have a lot of good things in common 

  • 'So let's just keep living our lives like that every single day and forget what they're saying in Washington,' she said 


By ASHLEY COLLMAN FOR DAILYMAIL.COM and RACHEL QUIGLEY FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 16:32 EST, 1 February 2018 | UPDATED: 17:32 EST, 1 February 2018

    



Michelle Obama sought to comfort Americans troubled by the Trump administration during a visit to the Ellen Degeneres show on Thursday. 
At a serious point in the interview, Ellen told the former first lady that she feels 'frightened' about the current state of the world and asked her what her take is on all that's happening in Washington, DC.   
'You know, yeah, people are afraid. But then there are people who feel good about the direction of the country. So I mean, that's what makes this country complicated. Because it's made up with so many different people from different backgrounds,' Mrs Obama said. 
While Americans differ wildly when it comes to politics, Mrs Obama said she knows that 'we do have have a lot in common' when it comes to our values and humanity. 

Scroll down for video 


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First interview: Michelle Obama sought to comfort Americans on Thursday by telling them to 'forget what they're saying in Washington' 


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Shared interests: While Americans differ politically, the former first lady says the country has a lot in common 


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Special episode: Mrs Obama appeared on the Ellen Degeneres show on Thursday to celebrate the host's 60th birthday
'So I would just encourage your viewers, the country, to do the things we do every day - to love each other, to take care of each other, to show empathy. And you can't do that only when people make you feel good or safe. 
'We've got to do it all across the board. We have to be an open-hearted nation and that's who we are. And that's the truth of who we are. 
'Yeah, so let's just keep living our lives like that every single day and forget what they're saying in Washington - that's not necessarily who we are. We know who we are,' she said. 
Mrs Obama went on to say that she learned this traveling the country with her husband, former President Barack Obama, when he was in office.   
'I went to towns and cities all over the place and even if people didn't agree with me or my husband, they were kind. They were hardworking. They were trying to do the right things every day. And that's what we have to remember about each other. That's who we are,' she said.  


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It was the former first lady's first televised interview since her husband left office last year















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Familiar face: Mrs Obama was a regular guest on Ellen's show during her husband's eight years in the White House 

[size=18]Justin Timberlake sings Ellen 60th bday from Super Bowl practice



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Also in the interview, Mrs Obama talked about the awkward gift exchange on President Trump's inauguration day. 
As is custom, the incoming first lady brings a gift for the outgoing president and his spouse. 
On Trump's inauguration day, Mrs Obama looked a little confused when Mrs Trump brought her a giant box from Tiffany's with a 'lovely frame' in it. 
The awkward moment - Mrs Obama desperately looking around for someone to hand the gift to before her husband took it and placed it inside the White House - became one of the most memorable moments of the day. 
'Well there is all this protocol,' Mrs Obama said. 'This is like a state visit so they tell you they're going to stand here, and never before do you get this gift so I'm kind of like, "OK...What am I supposed to do with this gift?" 

[size=18]Michelle Obama talks about the awkward Inauguration gift exchange



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Present: Mrs Obama also revealed on the show that inside that signature Tiffany-blue box Melania gifted her on Trump's inauguration day was a 'lovely frame'


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Twitter: The hilarious encounter has become one of the most joked-about moments from Inauguration Day, spawning countless GIFs and memes like this one
'And everyone cleared out and no one would come and take the box. And I’m thinking, do we take the picture with?
'And then my husband saved the day – see he grabbed the box and took it back inside. But everybody cleared out. No staff, no one. I was like what do you do with the box?' 
Mrs Obama appeared on the show for Ellen's two-part birthday special. 
Others who stopped by included Jimmy Kimmel and Jennifer Aniston. 
Mrs Obama was a frequent guest on the show during her husband's time in office and she even co-hosted in 2016.
As part of this, the pair appeared in a sketch in which Ellen took Michelle to CVS to prepare her for life after the White House. The clip has garnered almost 29 million views on YouTube.
In 2015 the former first lady participated in a dance party to Uptown Funk with the So You Think You Can Dance choreographers. 
In 2012, Michelle famously participated in a push-up competition with Ellen to promote her anti-obesity initiative Let's Move.
Ellen turned 60 on January 26 and since then a host of celebs have wished the star happy birthday, including Justin Timberlake, Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard.   





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Cohost in 2016: In a sketch for the show, Ellen took Michelle to CVS to prepare her for life after the White House. The clip has garnered almost 29 million views on YouTube





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Friends: On Thursday, Michelle, pictured cohosting in 2016, will appear in front of an audience of people who are paying it forward as part of the host's #OneMillionActsofGood campaign


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Campaign: In 2012, the former first lady participated in a push-up competition with Ellen to promote her anti-obesity initiative Let's Move


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Frequent guest: In 2015 Michelle participated in a dance party to Uptown Funk with some of the choreographers from So You Think You Can Dance

annemarie
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Sat 03 Feb 2018, 19:34

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5346195/Mexico-Relationship-US-closer-assumed.html

[size=34]No walls needed! Mexico has a 'closer' relationship with the US under Trump administration than ever before, country's foreign relations secretary claims[/size]

  • Mexico has a closer relationship with the United States under Trump administration than ever before, country's foreign relations secretary revealed

  • Luis Videgaray said it may come as a surprise to people but Mexico is 'committed to having a very close communication' with Trump's administration

  • Videgaray made the comments during a press conference with US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland

  • The three officials came together to discuss the North American Free Trade Agreement, as well as security concerns, trade and other global concerns


By MINYVONNE BURKE FOR DAILYMAIL.COM and ASSOCIATED PRESS
PUBLISHED: 15:27 EST, 2 February 2018 | UPDATED: 11:43 EST, 3 February 2018

    


Mexico and President Donald Trump may not see eye-to-eye on certain issues but that hasn't stopped the country from forming a pretty solid bond with the United States, the country's foreign relations secretary revealed.
Luis Videgaray, who serves as the Secretary of Foreign Affairs in Mexico, said Friday night that his country's relationship with the United States is 'more fluid' and 'closer' than it has been with previous US administrations.  
 'It might be surprising to some people, but that's a fact of life,' he said at a joint news conference in Mexico City with US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland. 


The three officials met to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement, according to the Associated Press. They also discussed security concerns, trade and other global concerns.


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Mexico and the United States are 'closer' than ever, it was revealed Friday during a joint news conference with officials from Mexico, Canada and the US. Pictured above is Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto (left) shaking hands with US President Donald Trump (right) at the G20 Summit in Hamburg, Germany, on July 7, 2017


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Canada's Minister of Foreign Affairs Chrystia Freeland (left) Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray (center) and US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson (right) held a joint news conference in Mexico City


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The three officials discussed the North American Free Trade Agreement, as well as security concerns, trade and other global concerns. Pictured above from left to right is Freeland, Videgaray and Tillerson during their news conference 

[size=10][size=18]Mexican FM Luis Videgaray says meeting with Tillerson was: 'useful'




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Over the past year, Trump and Mexico have had several well-publicized disagreements over issues including immigration, trade and payment for a proposed border wall. However, Videgaray said that 'with the Trump administration, we're committed to having a very close communication and that has proven to be a tremendous benefit for the relationship'.
'I want to highlight the role that – and leadership of Secretary Tillerson, who has been instrumental to achieving this, and to bring our countries closer,' Videgaray added. 'Yes, we do have some differences, as every other country does, but we've been working very closely, we've achieved substantial things, and we're looking into the future. 



'This is a relationship about opportunities and about the things that we can do together, and we're working well, we're working close, and we are about results.'
Tillerson's stop in Mexico kicked off a six-day Latin America trip that will also take him to  Panama, Argentina, Peru, Colombia and Jamaica. 
He was greeted in Mexico City on Friday by a handful of protesters holding up signs reading 'Dreamers, Trump's hostages,' and 'We are workers, not terrorists, not criminals.'
The three officials said they also discussed the political and economic crisis in Venezuela and its government's decision to push up presidential elections to April under conditions that opponents say overwhelmingly favor President Nicolas Maduro, who is so far the only candidate.


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Tillerson's stop in Mexico kicked off a six-day Latin America trip that will also take him to Panama, Argentina, Peru, Colombia and Jamaica. He was met in Mexico City with protectors like this woman who is holding up signs that read in Spanish: 'Dreamers as prisoners of Donald Trump,' and 'Stop deportations that separate families, causing pain, anguish, and tears'


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Freeland, Videgaray and Tillerson (pictured left to right) said they also discussed the political and economic crisis in Venezuela and its government's decision to push up presidential elections to April

[size=18]President Trump accuses Democrats of being AWOL over immigration



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'We shared our concerns for the humanitarian crisis that has unfolded in Venezuela,' Tillerson said. 'We all urge the Maduro regime to return to free, open credible, democratic elections.'
He added: 'If President Maduro would return to the Venezuelan constitution, restore the duly elected assembly, dismantle the illegitimate constituent assembly and return to free and fair elections, then he's happy to stay and run in the free and fair elections. If he wants to step aside and let someone else run in them, that's fine.'
Videgaray said Mexico had limits on how far it will go in pressuring Venezuela and would no t support any decision that 'involves violence, either internal or external'.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Sun 04 Feb 2018, 19:33

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5349421/John-McCain-condemns-release-Republican-memo.html

[size=34]John McCain condemns release of the GOP memo and says 'we are doing Putin's job for him'[/size]

  • McCain released a written statement on Friday when the memo was declassified 

  • GOP Senator said that 'partisan attacks' on the FBI serve 'only Putin's interests'

  • Memo charges the FBI relied primarily on a politically-motivated dossier compiled by ex-British intelligence officer Christopher Steele

  • Republicans claim it shows bias in the FBI at the onset of the Russia probe

  • The FBI had opposed the memo's release, citing 'grave concerns about material omissions of fact'

  • President Donald Trump tweeted on Saturday that the memo 'vindicated' him


By MARY KEKATOS FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 01:54 EST, 4 February 2018 | UPDATED: 10:03 EST, 4 February 2018

    



GOP Senator John McCain slammed President Donald Trump for approving the release of a once-classified memo.
The four-page document, released on Friday, contends that the FBI, when it applied for a surveillance warrant on a onetime Trump campaign associate, relied excessively on ex-British spy Christopher Steele whose opposition research was funded by Democrats.
At the same time, the memo confirms that the investigation into potential Trump links to Russia actually began several months earlier, and was 'triggered' by information involving a different campaign aide. 
McCain, who chairs the Senate Armed Forces Committee, issued a written statement saying 'if we continue to undermine our own rule of law, we are doing Putin's job for him', referencing Russia's president.



GOP Senator John McCain (left) slammed President Donald Trump (right) for approving the release of a once-classified memo, characterizing the memo and its release as 'partisan attacks' on the FBI and the Department of Justice


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McCain, who chairs the Senate Armed Forces Committee, issued a written statement saying 'if we continue to undermine our own rule of law, we are doing Putin's job for him', referencing Russia's president (pictured, Thursday)
'In 2016, the Russian government engaged in an elaborate plot to interfere in an American election and undermine our democracy,' McCain wrote in the statement.

'While we have no evidence that these efforts affected the outcome of our election, I fear they succeeded in fueling political discord and dividing us from one another.' 
Released around the same time that the memo was declassified, the Arizona Republican characterized the memo and its release as 'partisan attacks' on the FBI and the Department of Justice. 

RELATED ARTICLES





'Our nation's elected officials, including the President, must stop looking at this investigation through the warped lens of politics and manufacturing partisan sideshows,' McCain said. 
He added that such 'partisan attacks' on the FBI and the Department of Justice 'serve no American interests, no party's, no president's, only Putin's'. 
Spearheaded by Devin Nunes, a Republican from California and the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, the release of the memo set off a firestorm on Friday.
The FBI had opposed the memo's release, citing 'grave concerns about material omissions of fact'. 

[size=18]House GOP releases controversial Nunes memo alleging FBI bias



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After President Donald Trump declassified the memo, the Republican-led House Intelligence Committee released the memo based on classified information that alleges the FBI abused US government surveillance powers in its investigation into Russian election interference


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Trump's tweet called the Russia probe a 'Witch Hunt' and once again denied Russian collusion

[size=18]Trump calls contents of the GOP memo 'a disgrace'



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Republicans claimed it shows bias in the FBI at the onset of the Russia probe. 
But Democrats said it was a set of cherry-picked claims aimed at smearing law enforcement and that releasing the memo would damage law enforcement and intelligence work.  
The memo alleges that the FBI abused its surveillance authority during an investigation into Carter Page, the President's former foreign policy adviser.   
On Thursday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi sent a letter to Speaker of the House Paul Ryan demanding that Nunes be removed from his position.
'Congressman Nunes' deliberately dishonest actions make him unfit to serve as Chairman, and he must be removed immediately from his position,' she said.
Trump tweeted from Florida, where he was spending the weekend, that the memo puts him in the clear.
'This memo totally vindicates 'Trump' in probe,' he said. 'But the Russian Witch Hunt goes on and on. Their (sic) was no Collusion and there was no Obstruction (the word now used because, after one year of looking endlessly and finding NOTHING, collusion is dead). This is an American disgrace!' 


[size=34]What does the Intelligence Committee memo say? What does it mean?[/size]





Republican Rep. Devin Nunes, chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, was the driving force behind the controversial memo's declassification and release

A memo released on Feb. 2, 2018 by the House Intelligence Committee was written by Republican aides who had seen classified documents about government surveillance of a Donald Trump campaign adviser.
The four-page document itself does not appear to allege that anyone violated federal law, but it does outline a pattern of improper conduct by a list of high-ranking FBI and Justice Department officials during the Obama administration.
Republicans will use it to justify complaints that top law enforcement agencies had an anti-Trump bias during an election year.
These were the same agencies that cleared Hillary Clinton of wrongdoing in her classified email scandal, a subject that President Trump railed about consistently as he campaigned for the White House.
Democrats complain that the memo left out important facts and 'cherry-picked' information in order to present a one-sided view of what the FBI and DOJ did to persuade a judge to grant surveillance powers. 
WHAT DID THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT DO? 
A Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) judge granted the Justice Department a warrant to spy on Carter Page, a Trump foreign policy adviser, partially on the basis of an anti-Trump 'dossier' compiled by an opposition research group funded by Democrats.
Using a law firm as a middle-man, the Hillary Clinton campaign and the Democratic National Committee paid the firm, Fusion GPS. Fusion then paid former British spy Christopher Steele more than $160,000 to dig up Russia-related dirt on Trump.
The Republican memo concludes that Steele himself was biased, since he 'was desperate that Donald Trump not get elected and was passionate about him not being president.'
But the FBI continued using him as a confidential source anyway, even after he violated the most basic rule of working with a government intelligence service by telling a reporter what he was up to.
The warrant application also relied on a news article by a Yahoo reporter without telling the judge that leaks from Steele himself were at its center.
When the Justice Department asked the court for permission to spy on Page, it didn't disclose Steele's bias.
It also never mentioned that it was asking for a warrant based on materials that were paid for by Trump's political opponents.
WHY IS THE STEEL DOSSIER SO IMPORTANT? 
FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe testified before the House Intelligence Committee in December 2017 that 'no surveillance warrant would have been sought .... without the Steele dossier information.'
The dossier itself was full of bombshell claims about Trump, most notably that he cavorted with prostitutes in a Moscow hotel room that the Kremlin had rigged with recording devices.
Critics say Steele uncritically used information from Russian sources determined to compromise Trump or gain leverage over him – the exact opposite of the Democratic 'collusion' narrative that suggests Trump worked hand-in-hand with Moscow.
WHO IN THE GOVERNMENT IS ACCUSED OF WRONGDOING?
FISA warrants have to be renewed every 90 days; then-FBI Director James Comey, later fired by President Donald Trump, signed three of them. FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe signed another one.
Others to sign off included then-Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates, another official fired by Trump; then-Acting Deputy Attorney General Dana Boente; and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Another official implicated in the memo is then-Associate Deputy Attorney General Bruce Ohr. Ohr's wife was employed by Fusion GPS at the same time, but the FBI never told the FISA court about it.
Ohr was reassigned and is no longer in a position to impact the other major Russia investigation – one helmed by special counsel Robert Mueller.
But the fate of Rosenstein and McCabe is up in the air. Republicans on the Intelligence Committee may have given Trump a reason to fire them both. 
DOES THIS CHANGE ANYTHING FOR THE MUELLER PROBE? 
In a word, no. The memo doesn't say anything that suggests Mueller or his current team are engaged in anything illegal or unethical.
But the appearance of impropriety at the Justice Department, though unconnected, will give Trump supporters ammunition to claim Mueller's investigation is also suspect.
The president has consistently called the multiple investigations a collective 'witch hunt' and insisted he never colluded with Russians to tilt the 2016 election in his favor.
HOW WILL THIS AFFECT THE 'FISA' COURTS?
Judges empowered by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) grant more than 99 per cent of the warrant applications presented by the federal government.
This episode suggests that the process can be compromised by officials who are willing to hide material facts or provide courts with one-sided accounts of what they know and how they came to know it.
The flip side is that if FISA courts begin to scrutinize warrant applications more carefully, they might act too slowly in cases where there are urgent terrorism-related circumstances that require quick action. 
WHAT'S NEXT?
Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee have written their own counterpoint, a memo that they say fills in important facts the Republican majority omitted.
That document is winding its way through the same process the GOP's memo went through: committee votes to allow the full House of Representatives to see it, and then to release it to the public.
If that happens, the White House will again have five days to reject a request to declassify the Democrats' version. The White House has signaled that it will treat the two versions of history equally.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Mon 05 Feb 2018, 15:28

https://twitter.com/sarahhuckabee/status/794255968448020480

Remember this?




https://twitter.com/SenJohnMcCain/status/959471227038584834

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Mon 05 Feb 2018, 15:37

Those of us with common sense know this is just a way to throw suspicion off of him. He keeps saying this proves he 
did nothing. No it doesn't Mueller is still investigating if that was the case he would have ended the investigation or it wouldn't have started. The idiot thinks we are all fools.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Donnamarie on Mon 05 Feb 2018, 21:15

The thing to remember about Sarah Sanders is that she just parrots Trump.  She has no more credibility than he has.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Mon 05 Feb 2018, 21:26

Yep. But such a pity no-one calls her out on it.

I see the Dow is down to 2008 levels today..............

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Donnamarie on Mon 05 Feb 2018, 21:38

Right PAN.  The Dow plunge is headlining the news this afternoon over the Nunes’ memo story.    People are trying figure out what started this dive.  I have never been able to figure out why the stock market reacts drastically sometimes.  It’s a force of nature that defies logic ... at least for me.

Sanders does get called out .... but only by the those who don’t drink the Kool-Aid.


Last edited by Donnamarie on Mon 05 Feb 2018, 21:40; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : spelling!)
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Mon 05 Feb 2018, 23:07

The stock market seems to run on hope sometimes doesn't it?

It seems to be something to do with interest rates being likely to go up or it's 'self-regulating' apparently. Pass!

But I'm guessing there'll be a lot of Republican voters looking at their fortunes tonight and keeping an eye on things....


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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 06 Feb 2018, 11:03

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5354873/CA-professor-call-Trump-white-supremacist-syllabus.html

[size=34]'The President of the United States won the 2016 election by appealing to bigotry and hatred': California professor describes Trump as a 'white supremacist' and 'orange reality star' in political-science class syllabus[/size]

  • Dr. Brooke Mascagni teaches American Political Institutions at California State University-Dominguez Hills

  • She described Trump as a white supremacist, orange reality star in a syllabus

  • Mascagni also called him misogynist, narcissistic, volatile, belligerent, uninformed, stubborn and a failed businessman

  • She wrote students would learn 'how Americans form their political beliefs,' 'how democracy is threatened when it is taken for granted,' and why politics matters'


By MOLLIE CAHILLANE FOR DAILYMAIL.COM 
PUBLISHED: 15:41 EST, 5 February 2018 | UPDATED: 16:06 EST, 5 February 2018

    




Dr. Brooke Mascagni teaches American Political Institutions at California State University-Dominguez Hills
A political science and feminist studies professor at California State University-Dominguez Hills has described Donald Trump as a white supremacist and an orange reality star in a class syllabus.
Dr. Brooke Mascagni teaches American Political Institutions at the university and said in the syllabus that by the end of the class students will know 'how Americans form their political beliefs.
They will also understand 'how democracy is threatened when it is taken for granted,' why politics matters' and be able to 'understand how U.S. government and political processes promote – and constrain – liberty, equality, and popular sovereignty,' according to the syllabus obtained by Campus Reform.

A section called 'Why is this class important?' goes on to explain that 'Future generations will wonder how the greatest democracy in the world elected a white supremacist, misogynist, narcissistic, volatile, belligerent, uninformed, stubborn, failed businessman and orange reality star to the highest office.'
She continues by asking the question 'How will you explain it?'


+4


She described Trump as a white supremacist, orange reality star in a syllabus for a political-science class


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A section called 'Why is this class important?' goes on to explain that 'Future generations will wonder how the greatest democracy in the world elected a white supremacist, misogynist, narcissistic, volatile, belligerent, uninformed, stubborn, failed businessman and orange reality star to the highest office'
Mascagni then rails against Trump and the Republican party at large, pointing to the ever-increasing scandals shaking Congress and the White House.
'The President of the United States won the 2016 election by appealing to bigotry and hatred,' she wrote. 
'Just about everyday, a new scandal breaks or evidence of corruption emerges. Moreover, the Republican Party controls the executive and legislative branches of government, yet couldn't manage to keep the government running on the one year anniversary of Trump's inauguration.'
Mascagni continued: 'And, oh yeah, Russia interfered with the U.S. electoral process and our president is under investigation for obstruction of justice.'
'How did we get here? What facilitated Trump's rise to power? How is California challenging these threats to democracy?' she asked in the syllabus.

RELATED ARTICLES







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Scandal has followed Trump this year after news broke that Trump lawyer Michael Cohen had paid $130,000 to adult film star Stormy Daniels, who claimed in earlier interviews she had an affair with Trump (pictured Feb 5)
Scandal has followed Trump this year after news broke that Trump lawyer Michael Cohen had paid $130,000 to adult film star Stormy Daniels, who claimed in earlier interviews she had an affair with Trump.
At the same time, Robert Mueller and Trump are approaching a showdown after Republicans in congress released a memo alleging abuse of government surveillance powers by the Justice Department. 
It includes revelations that might complicate efforts by Trump and his allies to undermine the special counsel's inquiry.


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Mascagani wrote students would learn 'how Americans form their political beliefs,' 'how democracy is threatened when it is taken for granted,' and why politics matters'
The four-page document released Friday contends that the FBI, when it applied for a surveillance warrant on a onetime Trump campaign associate, relied excessively on an ex-British spy whose opposition research was funded by Democrats.
However, the memo also confirms that the investigation into potential Trump links to Russia actually began several months earlier, and was 'triggered' by information involving a different campaign aide.
DailyMail.com has reached out to Mascagni for comment.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Tue 06 Feb 2018, 13:09

Annemarie - Very Happy How do you find these things? Even though I agree with everything she said, I couldn't help thinking that I hope Mascagani has tenure - then I remembered she was teaching in California - so her job is probably safe.

Actually,  I agree with her assessment of Trump but I don't think a class so obviously biased is useful. Maybe she's planning for the actual classwork to be more balanced and wrote what she did to attract students to her class.  How we got where we are is important. To keep it from happening again we need to educate both sides of the aisle - not just reaffirm the prejudices of those who agree with us. If she teaches the course the way she describes it IMO she'll be preaching to the choir.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 06 Feb 2018, 21:53

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5359545/Trump-says-Id-love-shutdown-immigration.html



[size=34]'Let's have another shutdown!' Trump says Republicans would be right to let government funding lapse if he doesn't get his immigration demands
[/size]

  • The president leveled the threat in the middle of a meeting on combatting the MS-13 gang

  • He brought up a shutdown after laying out his immigration demands 

  • 'I'd love to see a shutdown if we don't get this stuff taken care of' 

  • He was countered by Virginia GOP Rep. Barbara Comstock 

  • 'We don't need a government shutdown on this,' the endangered lawmaker pushed back 

  • Government funding is set to run out on Friday

  • Democrats are insisting on protections for 'DREAMers' 



By FRANCESCA CHAMBERS, WHITE HOUSE CORRESPONDENT FOR DAILYMAIL.COM and GEOFF EARLE, DEPUTY U.S. POLITICAL EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 14:55 EST, 6 February 2018 | UPDATED: 16:36 EST, 6 February 2018


    


President Donald Trump said Tuesday that Republicans should force a government shutdown unless Democrats agree to his immigration demands. 
Trump had been talking about MS-13 gang members and 'loopholes' in the law that keep the illegal immigrant gang members in the country during a roundtable with immigration officials and lawmakers at the White House.
'If we don't change it, let's have a shutdown. We'll do a shutdown and it's worth it for our country. I'd love to see a shutdown if we don't get this stuff taken care of,' Trump said. 
Republican Congresswoman Barbara Comstock, who was present, rebutted the president moments later, telling him, 'We don't need a government shutdown on this.'

The president fired back:  'We are not getting support from the Democrats,' he told the Virginia congresswoman.


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President Donald Trump said Tuesday that Republicans should force a government shutdown unless Democrats agree to close 'loopholes' that allow immigrant gang members to enter the country
Trump countered Comstock, who has a political target on her back representing a district with a substantial number of Democrats and federal workers, immediately after she also praised the Washington Post – an occasional Trump punching bag. 
'The Washington Post has done some actual great reporting, these are all stories about the gang killers,' she said. 'People here live in fear just seven miles from the White House. They've been covering this,' Comstock said. 
Trump had said earlier in the roundtable that MS-13 'recruits through our broken immigration system, violating our borders, and it just comes right through, whenever they want to come through they come through.'
'It's much tougher now, since we've been there, but we need much better border mechanisms and much better border security,' he said. 'We need the wall. We're going to get the wall. If we don't have the wall, we're never going to solve this problem. ... Without the wall, it's not going to work,' he said. 


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Department of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen speaks as US President Donald Trump holds a roundtable discussion with law enforcement officials and local community leaders on the threat of MS-13 on February 6, 2018 at the White House in Washington,DC


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Trump made the comments about the shutdown at an immigration meeting that was broadcast on cable networks until they cut away
He added, 'I think the Democrats don't want to make a deal, but we'll find out.' 
His blast about a shutdown came on a day when Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer huddled with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in delicate talks over agreeing to raise spending caps on non-defense areas of government spending. 
Harping on the topic at the lengthy meeting that streamed live on the White House's website for all to see, Trump called for a government shutdown if a deal is not brokered that gives him what he wants.
Trump appeared to be referring to a Thursday evening deadline to pass new federal spending authorization. Congressional Republicans are looking to extend the the authority until March 23 through a stop-gap measure.
The president threw a wrench in the strategy at Tuesday's roundtable when he said,'If we have to shut it down because the Democrats don't want safety, and unrelated – but still related – they don't want to take care of our military, then shut it down. We'll go with another shutdown.'


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Rep. Barbara Comstock (R-Va.) challenged Trump's comments about a shutdown


+12


Alleged members of the MS13 and 18 gang board a police vehicle after being presented to the press in San Salvador on February 26, 2016


+12


Handcuffed inmates, members of MS-13 and Barrio 18 gangs, wait upon arrival at the maximum security prison in Zacatecoluca, 65 kilometres east of San Salvador, on August 9, 2017


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Members of the "Mara 18" gang kept under custody in the Supreme Court building, after a member of the rival "Mara Salvatrucha" gang was killed in Guatemala City on September 30, 2015


+12


Member of the Mara Salvatrucha (MS-13) Rumalda Fernandez, an inmate at the Women's National Prison, prepares baby bottles for her sons, during Mother's Day, in Tamara, Francisco Morazan, 25 km north of Tegucigalpa, on May 8, 2011
His saber rattling prompted the response from Comstock, whose district includes parts of suburban Fairfax County and stretches all the way to the Blue Ridge Mountains. 
When it came to her turn to speak, Comstock did not allow Trump to go unanswered.
'I would implore, since I live just over the [Potomac] River … We don't need a government shutdown on this. I think both sides have learned that a government shutdown was bad,' she said.
Back in May, Comstock voted against a House Republican leadership backed health care bill.

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Hillary Clinton won her district with 51 per cent of the vote. 
Cable networks carried the top of the meeting, hoping for a replay of the extraordinary meeting Trump held on immigration that included Democratic as well as Republican leaders.
They soon cutaway as the meeting trailed into talking points with people who mostly agreed with each other. 'It takes a whole of government approach and we're able to do that under your leadership, which we appreciate,' Homeland Security secretary Kirstjen Nielsen saluted Trump at one point. 
Trump got asked by a reporter about his explosive shutdown comments when the meeting was over.

[size=18]Trump 'Let's have a shutdown' if no deal reached on immigration



[/size]

'I would shut it down over this issue,' Trump said, not backing down. 
'I can't speak for everybody at the table but I will tell you, I would shut it down over this issue. If we don't straighten out our border, we don't have a country. Without borders we don't have a country. So would I would shut it down over this issue? Yes. I can't speak for our great representatives here but I have a feeling they may agree with me,' he added. 
Federal funding has already lapsed once this year - on the anniversary of Trump's inauguration. Trump called that lapse the 'Schumer Shutdown' while Republicans branded it the 'Trump Shutdown.'
A second catastrophe would inherently be blamed on Trump as a result of today's comments.   

Earlier on Tuesday Trump had touted a poll  that showed broad support for his immigration reform proposals, and blasted Democrats who oppose it.
'Polling shows nearly 7 in 10 Americans support an immigration reform package that includes DACA, fully secures the border, ends chain migration & cancels the visa lottery,' the president tweeted, promoting a news article about new polling numbers.
'If D[emocrat]s oppose this deal, they aren't serious about DACA–they just want open borders.'
The new Harvard-Harris Poll found that 65 per cent of registered voters would back 'a congressional deal that gives undocumented immigrants brought here by their parents work permits and a path to citizenship in exchange for increasing merit preference over preference for relatives, eliminating the diversity visa lottery, and funding barrier security on the U.S.-Mexico border.'



If Democrats oppose the White House's proposal, Trump tweeted, 'they aren't serious about DACA – they just want open borders'


+12


That's a near-verbatim description of the White House's preferred approach.
The poll also found 58 per cent would disagree with Democrats who vote to shut down the government over restoring DACA, the program that shields those young illegal immigrants from deportation.
Fifty-four per cent support building Trump's long-promised wall when it's described in practical terms as 'a combination of physical and electronic barriers across the U.S.-Mexico border.'
Sixty-eight per cent oppose 'the lottery that randomly picks 50,000 people to enter the U.S. each year for greater diversity.'
Trump also tweeted Tuesday that American needs 'a 21st century MERIT-BASED immigration system.'
'Chain migration and the visa lottery are outdated programs that hurt our economic and national security.'
Chain migration describes the current system that allows legal immigrants in the U.S. to sponsor what Trump's State of the Union speech last week called 'virtually unlimited numbers of distant relatives.'


+12




+12



[size=18]Trump declares US immigration system is 'stuck in the past'



[/size]

The White House instead wants to limit that to immediate family members.
Democrats have argued that what they call 'family reunification' laws should not be pared back. Some of them booed and hissed the president when he addressed the subject.
In reality, the U.S. imimgration system doesn't allow an individual green-card holder to directly sponsor distant relatives once he or she becomes a citizen.
But sponsoring a parent can lead to the sponsorship of the original immigrant's aunts and uncles, and then cousins. Sponsoring a sibling can lead to in-laws entering the country through other sponsorships.


+12


Trump also re-upped his contention that a merit-based immigration system is preferable to one that grants green cards on the basis of family relationships – another view that a new poll backs him up on












The resulting 'chain' is in fact practically unlimited but can take decades to unfold. 
Harvard-Harris pollsters asked registered voters whether 'immigration priority for those coming to the U.S. should be based on a person's ability to contribute to America as measured by their education and skills' or whether decisions should be made 'based on a person having relatives in the U.S.'
A robust 79 per cent chose the merit-based approach. Just 21 per cent said family relationships should take priority.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Tue 06 Feb 2018, 22:00

Do you know what Trump tweeted in 2015 about the 'Dow Joans '? 

https://mobile.twitter.com/mmpadellan/status/960661381803663360/photo/1
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Tue 06 Feb 2018, 22:05

If it weren't for chain migration the mush-brained moron in the White House would be living in Germany - if he was living at all! I love how he can ignore the fact that his grandfather was brought here by his sister so he could avoid the draft in Germany. Chain-migrator, draft dodger and a brothel owner! What a lovely family Trump comes from - and he really proves that the apple doesn't fall far from the tree!

Carolhathaway - There are a lot of people reminding him of that quote today. Too bad we can't actually do it!
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Tue 06 Feb 2018, 22:28

Quite, Lizzy!

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

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