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The Serious Side - part 2

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Fri 04 Aug 2017, 20:00

They'd do better to get their own house in order so there'd be nothing to leak! And the press needs to be more discriminating in choosing what to print to avoid problems like Sessions is threatening.

We already knew about the phone calls and that they didn't go well for Trump.  The Post printing the transcripts only served to enrage Trump supporters by making him look like an incompetent petulant child - which we already knew he was - and confirming for them that the media is biased and targeting Trump unfairly.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Sat 05 Aug 2017, 01:43

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4759648/Senators-head-home-block-Trump-recess-appointments.html

[size=34]Senate BLOCKS Trump from using 'recess appointment' to replace Jeff Sessions with a new attorney general who could fire Robert Mueller[/size]

  • Presidents are allowed to fill cabinet and court vacancies on their own without Senate confirmation if senators are on vacation

  • Those 'recess appointments' can last a year and side-step the Senate's constitutional role in approving nominees

  • Fearing Trump might use this power during August recess to replace Attorney General Jeff Sessions, all 100 senators agreed to technically remain 'in session'

  • The Senate will gavel in and then gavel out every three days so the White House can't say it's 'in recess' 


By AFP
PUBLISHED: 22:07 EDT, 3 August 2017 UPDATED: 18:36 EDT, 4 August 2017



     

     

     

     
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The U.S. Senate adjourned Thursday leaving Donald Trump deprived of any major legislative victory heading into summer break, as lawmakers also blocked the president from making so-called recess appointments during the rest period.
The move, by unanimous consent of the 100 senators, serves as a check on Trump as he mulls firing his Attorney General Jeff Sessions.
Trump has considered replacing his embattled top law enforcement official amid broadening investigations into allegations that his aides coordinated with Russia to tilt last year's election in his favor.
The president has strongly criticized Sessions for recusing himself from the probe, and speculation swirled over whether Trump would ram through a replacement during the break, without Senate confirmation.


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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell got all 100 senators to agree to technically keep the Senate open during August break, meaning President Donald Trump can't make a 'recess appointment' and slip a new attorney general past the congressional goalie


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Trump could have used the congressional 'recess' as a rationale for replacing Jeff Sessions (left) with someone willing to fire special counsel Robert Mueller
But that avenue closed Thursday when Senator Lisa Murkowski, adjourning the Senate for the day, locked in nine 'pro forma' sessions over the next month.
Such sessions typically last a minute or two, with no business conducted. Holding them keeps the Senate open during the vacation period, denying the president recess appointment opportunities.
The House of Representatives adjourned for its break last week.
As summer-bound US lawmakers exit Washington, the numbers are telling: with Trump in office seven months, and his Republican Party controlling all three branches of government, Congress has passed zero pieces of major legislation.
The Republicans' over-promised effort to repeal and replace Barack Obama's health care reforms collapsed in embarrassing shambles.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell had hoped to triumph on a health bill last month, leaving time to accomplish other goals including raising the US debt ceiling and working on budget bills for fiscal year 2018.


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Mueller, a former FBI director, was appointed by the Justice Department to probe whether anyone in the Trump presidential campaign colluded with Russia to tilt the 2016 election in the president's favor
But the health care fiasco sucked up weeks of debate time, and its cascading effect stalled other legislation.
Republicans do claim some victories, including confirming conservative judge Neil Gorsuch onto the Supreme Court, rescinding several Obama-era regulations and improving conditions for veterans.
One top accomplishment was the Russia sanctions bill that passed with overwhelming support, leading Trump to sign the measure into law despite not backing it.
And on Thursday Republicans got unanimous consent from the chamber to confirm more than 60 nominees, including US ambassadors to Britain and Canada and a new representative to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
But otherwise they now head home with few accomplishments, and likely to face conservatives angry at their failure to repeal Obamacare.
Number two Senate Republican John Cornyn signaled the health fight was not over.
'I can assure my colleagues that issue is not going away,' he said.

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New presidents often expend political capital to get important early priorities through Congress.
In early 2009, Obama passed an $800 billion economic stimulus package and bolstered equal-pay protections. George W. Bush passed his first round of tax cuts eight years earlier.
McConnell and Republican leadership in the House have signaled that the next major legislative lift will be tax reform.
But when Congress returns to work on September 5, it faces other immediate hurdles. Lawmakers will have precious little time to forge agreement on a budget and on extending federal borrowing authority.
Failure on those counts by October 1 could plunge the government into shutdown or a potentially catastrophic default, respectively.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 08 Aug 2017, 20:41

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4769030/UN-chief-Syria-probe-continue-despite-prosecutors-resignation.html

[size=34]'Everyone in Syria is bad': UN war crimes prosecutor QUITS after losing faith in ever bringing criminals in the country to account[/size]

  • Carla Del Ponte said she was quitting the three-member UN commission 

  • She quit saying 'we are powerless and 'everyone in Syria is on the bad side' 

  • Accused members of the Security Council 'of not wanting to establish justice'


By THOMAS BURROWS FOR MAILONLINE
PUBLISHED: 14:49 EDT, 7 August 2017 | UPDATED: 14:02 EDT, 8 August 2017



A UN war crimes prosecutor probing human rights abuses in Syria has quit saying 'we are powerless' and 'everyone in Syria is on the bad side'.
Carla Del Ponte said she was quitting the three-member commission investigating war crimes in the war-torn region because it 'does absolutely nothing'.
The 70-year-old Swiss, who had previously worked to uncover war crimes in Rwanda and Yugoslavia, had been working on the commission since September 2012.


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Prosecutor Carla del Ponte, pictured in 2015, quit a UN commission probing war crimes in Syria in protest at the lack of followup action from the UN Security Council to a dozen reports
Established by the UN Human Rights Council, the commission is tasked with reporting on serious rights violations and war crimes in Syria, where more than 330,000 people have been killed since the start of the conflict in March 2011.
It has published about a dozen reports on its progress but has been hampered by its inability to gain access in Syria itself, forcing it to rely on forensics, interviews, photos and medical records. 

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The commission has also repeatedly urged the Security Council to ask the International Criminal Court to open an investigation for war crimes in Syria.
However that has been blocked by China, as well as Russia, an ally of President Assad.
Del Ponte accused members of the Security Council 'of not wanting to establish justice.' 
She said she had never seen such crimes committed elsewhere, neither in Rwanda or Yugoslavia.


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A huge explosion sends clouds into the air after Assad's forces carried out air and ground strikes over the de-conflict zone, Ein Tarma district in the Eastern Ghouta region of Damascus


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An injured Syrian child receives treatment at a makeshift hospital in Jobar

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She told a panel discussion at the Locarno Film Festival: 'I am quitting this commission, which is not backed by any political will. I have no power as long as the security council does nothing. We are powerless, there is no justice for Syria.'
She added: 'I cannot remain on this commission that does absolutely nothing.'
The 70-year-old said: 'At first there was good and bad - the opposition on the side of good and the government in the bad role.
'Today everyone in Syria is on the bad side. The (Bashar al) Assad government has perpetrated horrible crimes against humanity and used chemical weapons. And the opposition is now made up of extremists and terrorists.' 

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said the commission would continue its work despite Del Ponte's resignation.
He said he regretted her decision to resign but stressed the 'importance of accountability for crimes against civilians during the conflict,' UN spokesman Stephane Dujarric said.
'He supports the continued work of the commission as an important and integral part of the accountability process,' he added. 
Catherine Marchi-Uhel, a French judge who has tried international cases in Kosovo, Cambodia and the former Yugoslavia, started work as the head of the new panel in Geneva on Tuesday.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Tue 08 Aug 2017, 20:52

Carla Del Ponte is so absolutely right, and that's the worst thing of all...
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 12:51

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4773744/Lawmakers-slam-Trump-s-fire-fury-warning.html

[size=34]'Great leaders don't threaten unless they're ready to act': Lawmakers led by John McCain slam Trump's 'fire and fury' warning over North Korea[/size]

  • Trump told North Korea that additional threats of violence against the U.S. 'will be met with the fire and the fury like the world has never seen' 

  • Lawmakers led by Republican Senator John McCain slammed him for his empty 'fire and fury' threats

  • 'The great leaders I've seen don't threaten unless they're ready to act and I'm not sure President Trump is ready to act,' he said 

  •  Democratic lawmakers accused Trump of being 'reckless' for making the 'unhinged' and 'bombastic' threats to the North Korean dictator

  • North Korea said earlier that the U.S. would 'pay dearly' for the United Nations sanctions regime it successfully imposed over the weekend 

  • US officials believe Kim Jong-Un has built a miniaturized warhead for missiles and are ramping up their rhetoric in turn 

  • North Korea said it is 'carefully examining' a plan to strike Guam in the wake of Trump's comments once leader Kim Jong Un makes a decision 


By HANNAH PARRY FOR DAILYMAIL.COM 
PUBLISHED: 01:16 EDT, 9 August 2017 | UPDATED: 04:27 EDT, 9 August 2017

    

Lawmakers led by Republican Senator John McCain have slammed Donald Trumpfor his empty 'fire and fury' threats to hit North Korea. 
'I take exception to the president´s comments because you've got to be sure you can do what you say you´re going to do,' he said in a radio interview on Tuesday. 'The great leaders I've seen don't threaten unless they're ready to act and I'm not sure President Trump is ready to act.'
Meanwhile, Democratic lawmakers accused Trump of being 'reckless' for making the 'unhinged' and 'bombastic' threats to the North Korean dictator. 
Trump had issued the warning to North Korean leader Kim Jong Un during a photo op at the Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey, after it was revealed that the communist country had successfully produced a miniaturized nuclear warhead.


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Republican Senator John McCain (pictured) slammed Donald Trump for his empty 'fire and fury' threats to hit North Korea
'North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States,' Trump warned. 'They will be met with fire, fury and frankly power the likes of which this world has never seen before.'

McCain dismissed the overly aggressive comments as 'classic Trump'.

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But the statement appears to have escalated tensions further with North Korea, which has announced it is now considering firing missiles at Guam, a U.S.-held Pacific island. 



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Comments from Trump came during a briefing on the opioid crisis on Tuesday at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster


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Trump stopped just short of a firm promise to declare war on Kim's government if the dictatorship continues to talk about 'physical action' to the U.S. during the meeting in New Jersey with Kellyanne Conway (left), HHS Secretary Tom Price, (second left), Melania Trump (second right) and the National Drug Control Policy Center's Richard Baum (right)



And it has raised concerns back in the US, on both sides of the aisle as Democrat lawmakers criticized Trump for his 'reckless' comments.
'We need to be firm and deliberate with North Korea, but reckless rhetoric is not a strategy to keep America safe,' Democratic Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York said in a statement issued Tuesday.
California Sen. Dianne Feinstein agreed the president was not helping to deescalate the situation with his 'bombastic comments', while New York Rep. Eliot Engel, the top Democrat on the House Foreign Affairs Committee, warned Trump may be drawing a line in the sand he can't retreat from.
'Make no mistake: North Korea is a real threat, but the President's unhinged reaction suggests he might consider using American nuclear weapons in response to a nasty comment from a North Korean despot,' Engel said.


Former U.S. diplomat Douglas Paal, now with the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace think tank in Washington, said Trump should not get into a war of words with Pyongyang.
'It strikes me as an amateurish reflection of a belief that we should give as we get rhetorically. 


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The comments raised concerns back in the US, on both sides of the aisle as Democrat lawmakers California Sen. Dianne Feinstein (left) and Sen. Chuck Schumer of New York (right) warned the president was being reckless
'That might be satisfying at one level, but it takes us down into the mud that we should let Pyongyang enjoy alone,' said Paal, who served as a White House official under previous Republican administrations.
A Japanese government source said Japan was not asking for Trump to tone down his remarks, based on its 'all options are on the table' stance.
Trump had stopped just short of a firm promise to declare war on Kim's government if the dictatorship continues to talk about 'physical action' to the U.S. on Tuesday.
'North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States,' Trump cautioned after a reporter asked him about the nuclear standoff.
Trump told the world Tuesday morning that it must be vigilant against North Korea in the face of new threats from the country's young dictator.
Kim had warned the United States that it would pay 'pay dearly' for the United Nations sanctions regime it successfully imposed over the weekend and hinted at military action as tensions continued to escalate.

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North Korea said it is 'carefully examining' a plan to strike the U.S. Pacific territory of Guam with missiles. The strike plan will be 'put into practice in a multi-current and consecutive way any moment' once leader Kim Jong Un (file above) makes a decision
'Physical action will be taken mercilessly with the mobilization of all its national strength,' North Korea's state-run news agency said Tuesday.
After Trump's 'fire and fury' warning, Pyongyang said it was 'carefully examining' a plan to strike Guam, home to a U.S. military base that includes a submarine squadron, an airbase and a Coast Guard group.
A Korean People's Army spokesman said in a statement carried by state-run KCNA news agency the plan would be put into practice at any moment once leader Kim Jong Un makes a decision.
North Korea also accused the United States of devising a 'preventive war' and said in another statement, citing a different military spokesman, any plans to execute this would be met with an 'all-out war wiping out all the strongholds of enemies, including the U.S. mainland'.
Washington has warned it is ready to use force if needed to stop North Korea's ballistic missile and nuclear program but that it prefers global diplomatic action, including sanctions. The U.N. Security Council unanimously imposed new sanctions on North Korea on Saturday.


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A Washington Post report earlier in the day on Tuesday suggested that North Korea had invented a miniaturized warhead that it has the capability of attaching to the intercontinental ballistic missiles its been testing


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Guam, which is known as the 'Tip of the Spear', is home to thousands of American service members and their families at both Andersen Air Force Base and Naval Base Guam
A Washington Post report on Tuesday suggested that North Korea had invented a miniaturized warhead that it has the capability of attaching to the intercontinental ballistic missiles its been testing. 
The development brings the country dangerously close to its goal of creating of a nuclear weapon that can hit targets in the U.S. 

U.S. MILITARY BASES ON GUAM 


Guam, which is roughly 2,128 miles from North Korea, is home to both Andersen Air Force Base and Naval Base Guam. 
The two U.S. military bases house nuclear bombers and other key assets; they both fall under Joint Region Marianas.
Andersen Air Force Base is located on the north end of Guam, approximately 15 miles from the capital Agana. It is in the village of Yigo.
The base houses bomber assurance and deterrence missions, including six B-52s which the air force says provide 'strategic global strike capability [to] deter potential adversaries and provide reassurance to allies'. 
Naval Base Guam is located on the southwest side of the island and has four fast-attack nuclear submarines and an expeditionary helicopter squadron. 
Roughly 28 percent of the island is occupied by the U.S. military.  At least 6,000 U.S. troops are stationed there.


Alaska, Hawaii and California would be at an especially high risk if Kim's scientists finish the weapons and North Korea decides to use them.
Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska) said on Tuesday that he is seriously worried about a possible North Korean missile strike on his state as well as the rest of the United States.
'There's concern, but there's also pride,' Sullivan said on Fox News's 'The Story' Tuesday. 'Alaska is the cornerstone of our nation's missile defense.'
He added that Alaska's missile defense battalion 'is literally protecting the country.'  
'The Alaska guard unit there calls themselves the 300, protecting the 300 million,' Sullivan said. 'So that's what they're doing now, protecting us.'
According to the report, US officials estimate that Kim now has 60 nuclear weapons in his possession. 
By comparison, the US is estimated to have more than 6,800 in its stockpile, and Russia is thought to have 7,000.
Shortly after Trump's morning message, United States Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley appeared on Fox & Friends to deliver tough talk to North Korea and take a victory lap on sanctions.
'The United States will respond accordingly, and I think the international community will respond accordingly,' she said of the dangerous actions that Kim could take in response to the punishing actions.'

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 12:58

These are two terrible infants who want to play war games, unfortunately they are both crazy and can destroy other countries and kill people. 

Why did sullivan discuss our missile defense in Alaska all this bragging is not good .

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 13:28

I still remember people who said: "If Hillary's gonna be our next president, she'll lead us into WW III!"

I'd love to talk to these people now...
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 14:21

Yes Carol, I wonder what they have to say now.

I am thankful that there are people who have to agree to us going to war it is not just the idiots decision.
But for North Korea there is no one to stop that nut.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Wed 09 Aug 2017, 22:16


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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Thu 10 Aug 2017, 01:04

He is just a liar and the happy news thing is ridiculous.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Thu 10 Aug 2017, 09:40

So here we are with two deluded men on opposite sides of the world running the show, with a State Department only 40% staffed with highly qualified diplomats who might know what they're doing, a guy in uniform feet away from the President with the nuclear code and a recommendation that someone should be on suicide watch given Trump's popularity numbers.

Excellent

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Thu 10 Aug 2017, 11:55

Yes Pan to everything,


The whole thing could have been avoided if someone had dealt with kim years ago
 No one sat down and  figured out a way to stop him. Now it may be too late.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Thu 10 Aug 2017, 17:30

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4777252/Stephen-Miller-criticized-heaping-praise-Trump.html

[size=34]White House aide Stephen Miller says Trump is 'the best orator to hold that office in generations' - and instantly gets ripped to shreds on Twitter[/size]

  • White House aide Stephen Miller heaped praise on Donald Trump during a Fox News interview on Tuesday night

  • He said Trump was the most gifted politician of our time and the best orator to hold office in generations

  • Miller's comments instantly made the policy adviser a target on Twitter

  • He also attacked the media in his interview saying they are driving bad polling results in an attempt to smear Trump 


By EMILY CRANE FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 23:30 EDT, 9 August 2017 | UPDATED: 01:42 EDT, 10 August 2017

    
White House adviser Stephen Miller has been torn to shreds on Twitter after saying that Donald Trump is the most gifted politician of our time.
Miller heaped praise on the President during a television interview on Fox News on Tuesday night.
'President Trump is the most gifted politician of our time,' Miller told host Laura Ingraham, who was filling in on Tucker Carlson Tonight.

'He's the best orator to hold that office in generations.' 


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White House adviser Stephen Miller has been torn to shreds on Twitter after saying that Donald Trump is the most gifted politician of our time

Miller, who is a top aide and speechwriter for Trump, went on to say the administration would continue to take its message out to the people. 
'(Trump) is the leader of this nationwide and worldwide populist movement and it's about lifting working class people - black, Hispanic, white, all backgrounds,' he said.
Miller also attacked the media in his interview on Tuesday, saying they are driving bad polling results in an attempt to smear Trump. 
'The extreme media is going to do whatever they can to tear down this president,' Miller said. 
'The media has gotten the president wrong since the day he announced and every day since. And he has been right, and they have been wrong.' 
His comments about Trump being the 'best orator' instantly made the policy adviser a target on Twitter. 
'My 9-year-old son is a better orator than @realDonaldTrump,' one Twitter user wrote. 


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'I was actually thinking if I can compare my two year old grandson to trump. It was a very close call who speaks better,' another tweeted.
One Twitter user said: 'Simply 'the best' orator, if one is in the fifth grade. Oh sorry, second grade.'
'Trump is the best orator, is to Steven Miller having the best hairline,' another wrote. 
Reuters reported earlier this week that Miller was a top candidate to lead the White House's communications team, according to sources. 

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On Thursday, Miller briefed reporters at the White House on Trump's support for legislation that would overhaul the current immigration system by creating a merit based system for issuing visas, favoring younger immigrants with advanced degrees.
He sparred with a CNN reporter who asked whether such a policy was potentially racist and ran counter to the American values, and accused him of having a 'cosmopolitan bias.'

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Thu 10 Aug 2017, 17:33

Working for this idiot must pay very well that is the only reason I can come up with for them being willing to lie the way they all do.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Thu 10 Aug 2017, 17:33

Or could it be delusion and power?


Good news here from somebody who's a bit more level-headed and statesmanlike.......

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/av/40885831/al-gore-on-the-paris-agreement-trump-and-climate-change

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Fri 11 Aug 2017, 19:17

Wow! This guy is really good - and he's part of the Trump government!!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWci1eaFgX0

If only he was P..........................

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Fri 11 Aug 2017, 19:46

PAN - General Mattis is one of the few intelligent, articulate, experienced people working in the Trump administration. Sadly, too often his job is to explain and defend administration policy without saying anything that will get him fired. I'm glad he's there, but I bet he often wishes he wasn't.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Fri 11 Aug 2017, 22:20

I don't know why but somehow 'Wag the Dog' just came to my mind. Does anyone here kniw this movie?
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Sat 12 Aug 2017, 19:35

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4784600/White-Helmets-rescuers-shot-dead-Syria.html

[size=38]Hero White Helmets rescuer who wept as he pulled baby girl from Syrian rubble in footage that reduced BBC newsreader to tears is shot dead alongside six colleagues[/size]

  • WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT 

  • Abu Kifah made headlines in October when filmed saving the baby, leading to Kate Silverton shedding tears

  • Volunteers shot by unidentified gunmen early this morning and had their helmets and walkie talkies stolen

  • The dead were buried later today in an emotional funeral service attended by their colleagues and friends


By LIZZIE PORTER IN BEIRUT and HUSSEIN AKOUSH IN GAZIANTEP and JOE SHEPPARD and RORY TINGLE IN LONDON FOR MAIL ONLINE
PUBLISHED: 09:58 EDT, 12 August 2017 | UPDATED: 13:21 EDT, 12 August 2017

    
The White Helmets rescuer who pulled a baby girl from the wreckage of an airstrike in footage that brought a BBC newsreader to tears is among seven volunteers who have been shot dead in Syria.
Abu Kifah made headlines in October after a moving video of him saving month-old Wahida Ma'artouk was broadcast on television.
The moment was so powerful that journalist Kate Silverton was overcome with emotion live on air. 
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Abu Kifah (pictured left with the baby girl he rescued, Wahida Ma'artouk) is among seven killed in the shooting by unidentified gunmen

[size=28]Video playing bottom right...


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This disturbing image shows the blood-spattered walls of the room in which the volunteers were shot. The White Helmets logo is seen in the centre


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Members of the Syrian White Helmets bury their fellow volunteers who were shot dead early this morning in an emotional ceremony in Sarmin, a jihadist-controlled town six miles from Syria's north-western city of Idlib


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 Abu Kifah made headlines in October after footage of him saving the infant by pulling her out of a rubble-strewn building were broadcast on television
Matiah Jallal, a close friend and colleague of Abu Kifah, told MailOnline: 'It is hard for me to describe what I feel now. The whole town is mourning Abu Kifah and his colleagues.'
His murder is all the more tragic as he had fathered a child himself within the past year. At the time of rescuing Wahida Maatouk, he had told MailOnline how much he had wanted a child.
His wife is understood to be in a state of shock and with her husband's relatives.
Khaled Khatib, a media officer with the White Helmets who knew Abu Kifah before his murder, confirmed the deaths to MailOnline and said: 'Abu Kifah was a tailor before the revolution began in 2011 and joined the White Helmets due to the incessant and brutal attacks on civilians.' 
The White Helmets, also known as the Syrian Civil Defence, confirmed seven of its volunteers had been killed in cold blood by unidentified gunmen who attacked their office in Sarmin early this morning. 
The bodies of the men have since been buried in a funeral service in Sarmin.

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A large procession of mainly men, some wearing White Helmets, carried the dead with many mourners seen breaking down in tears.
'The civil defence centre in Sarmin was the target of an armed attack by unknown assailants in which seven volunteers were killed,' the White Helmets said in statement.
'Two minibuses, some white helmets and walkie-talkies were stolen.'
An image of the moment the bodies were discovered shows the bloodied corpses of the uniformed workers surrounded by grieving colleagues clasping their heads in their hands.
Another photograph shows a wall at the office emblazoned with a White Helmets logo that is spattered in blood.
No one has immediately claimed responsibility for the rare attack but it comes amid tension in the area. 


[size=18]BBC anchor Kate Silverton cries after covering Syria airstrikes




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 A friend said the whole town is in mourning Abu Kifah and his colleagues. Hayat Tahrir al-Sham, a jihadist group which controls the area where the attack happened, denounced what it called an 'ugly crime'


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An image of the moment the bodies were discovered shows the bloodied corpses of the uniformed workers surrounded by grieving colleagues clasping their heads in their hands 
Sarmin is in Idlib province, which was recently taken by the al-Qaida-linked Hayat Tahrir al-Sham (HTS) group after several clashes with Ahrar al-Sham, an ultraconservative rival organisation.
The HTS recently said its members have discovered sleeper cells of Islamic State, who they claim were planning an attack.
Al-Qaida's affiliate, which used by to be known as the Nusra Front, has fought deadly battles with ISIS over the past years. 
Hayat Tahrir al-Sham denounced what it called an 'ugly crime' and vowed to track down the perpetrators and bring them to account.
The jihadist group said the attack was aimed at 'undermining our revolution', adding that it stood ready to protect the White Helmets in 'liberated areas' of Syria. 
The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said the seven were killed after being shot execution style, adding that the bodies were discovered by fellow White Helmets volunteers who had arrived to start a shift.
The attackers had fled with two vans, helmets and walkie talkies. One of the vehicles was later found burned out on the edge of a field near the centre.



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A member of the White Helmets mourns his seven comrades at their funeral service. The group's activities have been depicted in numerous documentaries and news reports shown in the west


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No one has immediately claimed they carried out the attack, sparking numerous theories about who was responsible, but it comes amid tension in the area




Opposition activists in Idlib said they did not believe the killings had been orchestrated by the HTS as the group has not targeted the White Helmets in the past.
Some have claimed that the attack was conducted by agents of the Assad regime in order to fuel distrust among rival rebel groups. 
One activist, who did not wish to be named, said the attackers used pistols equipped with silencers, adding that people living nearby did not notice anything unusual.
He claimed ISIS sleeper cells have been discovered in Sarmin and added that he believed the attack could likely been carried out by members of the terrorist organisation in a bid to show that Idlib is not safe.
Another theory is that the attacks were carried out by criminals wanting to steal equipment from the centre. 
The White Helmets have called on all Syrian checkpoints in the north of the country to detain any vehicle emblazoned with the group's logo.  

The organisation, which concentrates on urban search and rescue in response to bombing, has seen more than 150 of its members killed since its formation in 2014.
The White Helmets were widely considered likely to win last year's Nobel Peace Prize.


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A large procession of mainly men, some wearing White Helmets, carried the dead - many mourners were seen breaking down in tears
They emerged in 2013, working to rescue civilians in rebel-held areas.
The group has since gained international renown for their daring rescues, often filmed and circulated on social media, and were nominated for the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize.
Although they work exclusively in rebel-held areas, they insist they are non-partisan.
Their detractors, including President Bashar al-Assad's government and his ally Russia, accuse them of being tools of their international donors.
They receive funding from a number of Western governments, including Britain, Germany, the Netherlands and the United States.
Critics also accuse them of harbouring rebel fighters, including jihadists, in their ranks.
Elsewhere in Syria, a suicide attacker blew himself up inside a training camp for the Army of Islam rebel group in the southern town of Naseeb, near the border with Jordan, killing more than 20 fighters.
The Observatory said Saturday that the Friday night blast killed 23 and wounded 20, some of whom were in critical condition.
Ahmad al-Masalmeh, an opposition activist based in the southern province of Daraa, said about 80 Army of Islam members were having dinner inside a tent when the suicide attacker walked in and blew himself up. He said 30 were killed, 20 were wounded and six are still missing.
No one claimed responsibility for the deadly bombing but IS has previously claimed such attacks.

[size=34]Syrian army secures ISIS stronghold[/size]


Syrian government forces seized full control of the last major town in Homs province held by ISIS, Syrian state media reported on Saturday, as the army and its allies press a multi-pronged advance into eastern areas held by the jihadist group.
Syrian state media cited a military source saying ISIS militants had been killed and their weapons destroyed at the town of al-Sukhna, some 30 miles northeast of the ancient city of Palmyra.
The town is also located some 30 miles from the provincial boundary of Deir al-Zor province, Islamic State's last major foothold in Syria and a major target for the Syrian government.
The jihadists have lost swathes of Syrian territory to separate campaigns being waged by government forces backed by Russia and Iran, and by the U.S.-backed Syrian Democratic (SDF) Forces, which is dominated by the Kurdish YPG militia. The SDF is currently focused on capturing Raqqa city from Islamic State.
Syrian government forces advancing from the west have recently crossed into Deir al-Zor province from southern areas of Raqqa province.
ISIS controls nearly all of Deir al-Zor province, which is bordered to the east by Iraq. The Syrian government still controls a pocket of territory in Deir al-Zor city, and a nearby military base. 

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Sun 13 Aug 2017, 22:51

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4787100/White-House-includes-hate-groups-new-statement.html

[size=34]White House updates statement on Charlottesville violence condemning 'white supremacists, KKK and Neo-Nazis' - though Trump stays silent and away from the press[/size]

  • On Sunday, an unnamed White House spokesperson noted that 'of course' President Trump condemns hate and extremist groups 

  • Trump was receiving criticism for condemning violence in Charlottesville, Virginia coming from 'many sides' 

  • Members of his own party felt the statement wasn't strong enough because it didn't call out members of the KKK, neo-Nazis and other white supremacists 

  • The dispute comes on the heels of a violent day in Virginia, in which a counter-protester was killed by a Nazi sympathizer ramming his car through a crowd 

  • Beyond the White House statement, President Trump stayed off of Twitter on Sunday and away from reporters gathered near his Bedminster resort 


By NIKKI SCHWAB, U.S. POLITICAL REPORTER FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 16:30 EDT, 13 August 2017 | UPDATED: 17:29 EDT, 13 August 2017

A White House spokesperson updated the statement delivered by President Trump yesterday, in which Trump condemned violence 'on many sides' and failed to call out hate groups marching in Charlottesville, Virginia.
'The President said very strongly in his statement yesterday that he condemns all forms of violence, bigotry, and hatred,' the spokesperson said. 'Of course that includes white supremacists, KKK, Neo-Nazi and all extremist groups.' 
Trump's statement was widely criticized – including by members of his own political party – for seemingly equating the white nationalists and neo-Nazis, gathered in the Virginia town to protest the removal of a Confederate Robert E. Lee statue, with those marching against the hate groups. 
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An unnamed White House spokesperson updated President Trump's statement on yesterday's violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, now including condemnation specifically of white nationalists, KKK members and neo-Nazis  


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On Saturday, President Trump spoke from his Bedminster, New Jersey resort and condemned the violence in Charlottesville, though said it was coming from 'many sides' and not just the hate groups gathered in the Virginia town 
On Saturday, a Nazi sympathizer, 20-year-old James Fields of Ohio, used his Dodge Charger to run over counter-protesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer and injuring 19 more. 
Fields has been charged with second degree murder. 
'We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides, on many sides,' Trump said Saturday from his Bedminster, New Jersey resort, where he is spending a large chunk of August. 
On Sunday, the unnamed White House spokesperson said Trump 'called for national unity and bringing all Americans together,' according to the White House pool report. 
Trump, himself, was uncharacteristically quiet, staying off Twitter all day. 
The pool of reporters charged with following the president was told not to report to duty until 6 p.m. Sunday, with the White House not releasing details about Trump's whereabouts, including whether or not he was playing golf.
In the meantime, a number of President Trump's Republican counterparts in Congress have spoken out, suggesting the president didn't go far enough in condemning the hate groups or labeling the car assault 'terrorism.' 

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'@POTUS America's children are watching. Denounce white nationalists & their evil ideology. They are enemies of liberty & our Constitution,' wrote Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., on Twitter Sunday afternoon. 
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, another member of the conservative wing of the Republican Party, called the Nazis, the KKK and white supremacists 'repulsive and evil' and asked the Justice Department to investigate Saturday's 'grotesque act of domestic terrorism.' 
Trump's Homeland Security Advisor Tom Bossert was left filling in the blanks for the White House as he tussled with CNN's Jake Tapper Sunday morning over whether President Trump's statement went far enough. 
'I guess you are going to continue to press on the words he didn't say,' Bossert said after Tapper pressed him several times on whether Trump's statement was lacking. 'But I would like you to focus for just a moment on the rest of the statement that he did say.' 
'This is the kind of reputation of hatred that needs to be covered more. I think it's leadership,' Bossert argued. 
Tapper pointed to the chorus of Republicans who criticized the statement and asked Bossert to speak to that. 
The national security adviser tried to argue that Republican leaders and Trump essentially said the same thing. 
'They have all denounced the violence, denounced the groups that showed up,' Bossert said. 


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President Trump's Homeland Security Advisor Tom Bossert (right) was left to tussle with CNN's Jake Tapper (left) over the statement President Trump made Saturday, after one white nationalist counter-protester was run over and killed by a Nazi sympathizer 
Bossert noted that both 'protesters and counterprotesters' showed up yesterday. 
'These were people who showed up intentionally looking for trouble. These weren't people that showed up to protest a statue,' he said. 'I'm sure there were good people in the group that had various opinions on the removal or maintenance of the statue, but ... what they found when they showed up were groups from outside that showed up on both sides looking for trouble, dressed in riot gear, prepared for violence.'   
With Bossert also seemingly equating the racists with the counter-protesters, Tapper asked, 'How many people did the counter-protesters kill yesterday, Mr. Bossert?' 
'Well, I will tell you, one death is too many,' Bossert answered. 
'But that wasn't by the counter-protesters. She was, the victim was a counter-protester,' Tapper pointed out.  'The victim was a counter-protester.'
With that, Bossert got defensive. 
'I don't for one minute, I don't for one moment, and I won't allow you for one second to put me in a position of being an apologist for somebody who is now a charged murderer,' the top Trump adviser said.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 03:31


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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 06:46

During the last hours, three of Trump's advisors resigned due to his inert position against the terror in Charlottesville.
Brian Krzanich, CEO of Intel, summoned Trump to speak out against the White Supremacy.
Kevin Plank, CEO of Under Armour, said his company would concentrate on 'unity, diversity and inclusion'.
Kennwth Frazier, CEO of Merck said that he's angry that 'Trump doesn't call the racists and neonazis as dangerous racists and neonazis.'

One thing I don't understand is (besides many others): Why are people allowed to wear guns during a demonstration? There's always the danger of an escalation. As we all know, you can use pretty much everything as a weapon, you don't need guns to defend yourself (or to kill others).
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 10:43

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4790620/Protesters-gather-security-heavy-Trump-heads-NY-home.html

[size=38]'Two days too late': Thousands of protesters furious at President's response to Charlottesville gather outside Trump Tower as he heads to his New York home for the first time since inauguration - and takes a back route so he can AVOID them all[/size]

  • Thousands gathered on Fifth Ave at Trump Tower in Manhattan on Monday as Donald Trump returned home

  • Protesters demanded his resignation after he took two days to denounce white supremacist violence in Va.

  • They lined the sidewalks on Fifth Avenue from late afternoon onward, awaiting the president's return 

  • Trump eventually approached Trump Tower using a back route - avoiding the protesters altogether 

  • One woman was killed and 19 other people injured on Saturday when a Nazi ally drove into them in Virginia

  • Trump initially complained of violence and hatred on 'many sides,' without naming neo-Nazis and their allies

  • Only on Monday did he call racism 'evil' and denounce violent white supremacists as 'criminals and thugs'

  • The president said on Friday that he stays out of Trump Tower because road closures would be too disruptive

  • At least one person was arrested by police at the event although the details are unclear 


By ASSOCIATED PRESS and JAMES WILKINSON FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 18:06 EDT, 14 August 2017 | UPDATED: 03:13 EDT, 15 August 2017

    

Protesters furious that Donald Trump took two days to denounce Saturday's white supremacist violence gathered in their thousands in New York as he headed back to Trump Tower for the first time since the inauguration.

Demonstrators holding signs saying 'Two days too late' and 'Refuse Fascism' stood in pens erected by police across the street from Trump Tower in Manhattan and lined nearby blocks of Fifth Avenue by early Monday evening, hours before his expected arrival. 
Chants of 'Black lives matter' and 'Love, not hate - that's what makes America great' rose above traffic noise, while an inflatable, rat-like caricature of Trump stood by The Plaza hotel, two blocks from Trump Tower. Others were heard chanting 'New York hates you!'
But Trump, who arrived back at his beloved tower around 9:10pm, took a back route, allowing him to circumvent the protesters altogether. 
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An inflatable, rat-like Donald Trump watches over the thousands of protesters gathering near Trump Tower in Manhattan to protest the president after his muted response to white supremacist violence in Virginia on Saturday


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Trump complained of violence from 'many sides' on Saturday, after 1 woman was killed and 19 injured by a neo-Nazi supporter who drove into a crowd. He amended that on Monday, openly denouncing racism, but it wasn't enough for these protesters


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Many of the protesters in the famously liberal and diverse city suggested that Trump had made himself - at the very least - a frontman for fascism by his words and actions


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Protesters gather ahead of Trump's return to Trump Tower. They held placards demanding Trump get out of office and stop 'supporting fascists;' some others held signs demanding an end to cutbacks in Congress


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Protesters held up signs demand the end of the Trump administration and likening the president to a Nazi as they gathered on the road opposite the tower


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This early arrival to the protest had a salty greeting ready and waiting for the president when he arrived. Trump is enormously proud of his New York heritage, so reactions like this may upset him


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One woman was seen being arrested by police at the scene, although the circumstances surrounding her detainment were not immediately clear


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She was then seen being hauled off by NYPD officers as the protesters continued to chant 'Black lives matter' and 'Love, not hate - that's what makes America great' 


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Trump did not look pleased to be leaving his plane in New York, even though he hasn't been back to his tower on Fifth Avenue since he took office. He said that he stayed away because the security surrounding the tower was too disruptive


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After Trump got off in New York he was flown in Marine One (pictured) to the presidential limo (in the foreground) at the Downtown Manhattan/Wall Street Heliport


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The presidential limo arrived at Trump Tower at around 9:20pm on Monday, as part of the presidential motorcade. Rather than driving up Fifth Avenue, where the protests were based, Trump drove the wrong way up a closed 56th St from Madison Ave


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That allowed him to enter the building via this tent, which had been constructed on Saturday, away from the shouts and cries of the angry protesters


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Trump's motorcade is seen here driving along 56th Street on its way towards Trump Tower's side entrance


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Trump can be seen, apparently waving to police and security, in this close-up shot of the motorcade


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After arriving back in New York, Trump tweeted: 'Feels good to be home after seven months, but the White House is very special, there is no place like it... and the US is really my home!'


[size=10][size=18]Thousands of protesters march outside of Trump Tower

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Trump landed in New York on Air Force One, and was then carried by Marine One to a helicopter pad near Wall St, at the south end of Manhattan. There, he got into the Presidential limousine and was taken North to Trump Tower.
But rather than approach the tower's front entrance, Trump had 56th Street shut down between Fifth Avenue and the parallel Madison Avenue, then drove the wrong way down it - moving east to west, rather than the correct west to east - before pulling up in a tent.
That tent, erected Saturday, allowed him access to his beloved Trump Tower - while helping him avoid the furious protesters outside. He arrived at the building around 9.10pm.
After landing in New York, he tweeted: 'Feels good to be home after seven months, but the White House is very special, there is no place like it... and the U.S. is really my home!'

Two protesters were spotted inside Trump Tower prior to Trump's arrival, holding up signs reading 'Hate has no home here.' 
A much smaller group of pro-Trump counter-protesters were seen holding up signs in support of the president; they were kept separate from the anti-Trump protesters. 
And earlier in the afternoon, police were seen arresting a woman, although the reason for her detainment - and whether she was part of a protest or counter-protest - was not clear.
The Reverend Jan Powell, a retired minister of the United Church of Christ, carried a sign that read 'No justice, no peace' as she stood opposite Trump's signature tower.
She said she was bothered by the Republican president's delayed response to the violence seen at Saturday's Unite the Right rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, when one woman was killed and 19 others injured after a white supremacist drove a car into a group of antifascist protesters.
But 'what bothers me the most is when folks like Trump try to silence our First Amendment right to free speech, either with violence or "fake news" or hate speech,' she said.
Still, she added: 'I pray for him every day. We are both human beings.'

[size=18]Inflatable rat resembling Trump rises on the streets of New York




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Trump did have some supporters among the thronging crowds, but they were vastly outnumbered by those opposing the president's return


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Another pro-Trump counter-protester - along with a sign about orthodox Jews voting for Trump - is seen here shouting as people pass by during protests ahead of the president's arrival


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Protesters spell out a message to Trump in inflatable balloons - 'F U TRUMP' - as the sun sets outside Trump Tower on Manhattan's famous Fifth Avenue


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This protester painted stars and stripes teardrops on her cheeks as she professed to stand with the people she believes Trump hates - Jews, Muslims and black people


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Placards reading 'White silence is violence' were also seen at various other protests on Sunday as people gathered in support of those killed and hurt on Saturday


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Protesters gathered in their thousands throughout the day - although none of them were to see the president, who sneaked into Trump Tower in a side entrance 


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 Protesters talk among themselves during the early stages of the protest on Monday afternoon


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White dump trucks were parked opposite as part of a security measure. They were filled with sand and used to block the entrance from possible car threats
 Meanwhile, police had stationed sand-filled sanitation trucks as barriers around Trump's signature skyscraper and layers of metal police barricades around the main entrance.
After Trump was elected president November 8, security around the tower ramped up dramatically, including the use of the sanitation trucks. 
A maze of barricades and checkpoints were manned by scores of uniformed police officers under the supervision of a mobile command center. 
The security precautions have been lessened somewhat in his absence but still have inconvenienced residents and business owners in the highly trafficked area, home to stores such as Tiffany and Louis Vuitton.
Trump, a native New Yorker who cherishes his namesake high-rise, said Friday that he had stayed away because he realized the impact of the street closings and other aspects of a presidential visit. 

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Trump Tower is located close to the corner at which Fifth Avenue - already a busy street famous for its big-name stores like jewelers Tiffany & Co - meets Central Park; an area popular with tourists. 
'I would love to go to my home in Trump Tower, but it's very, very disruptive to do,' Trump said. 
Protester Gabby Parra, however, said she was demonstrating to show Trump 'he's not welcome here.'
'We need to let him know that New Yorkers and people from around here are not going to accept his blatant idiocy,' said Parra, a 17-year-old high school senior from Teaneck, New Jersey.
She said she feels the president dehumanizes minorities, noting that he launched his campaign by portraying Mexico as a source of rapists and murderers coming into the US and that he initially failed to denounce white supremacists specifically after Saturday's violence.  
City Council Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito, a Democrat, was among the protesters. 



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There were also anticapitalist protesters (seen at rear of photo) as well as those objecting to the president's perceived racism and white supremacist support


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A speaker calls for people to put their fists in the air as people gather outside Trump Tower. Fifth Avenue, which houses the tower, also plays home to many major shops, including the famous Tiffany & Co jewelers


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This protester said she was 'ashamed to be white' in the wake of the white supremacist rally held Saturday, and its support rallies on Sunday. Unite the Right had attracted members of the KKK and neo-Nazi groups


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Security outside the tower was ramped up ahead of the president's return. It had been stepped down during his absence but returned to pre-inauguration highs on Monday 


Demonstrator Natasha Beshenkovsky, 73, of Washington Heights, told Gothamist that she feared Trump would try to recreate the kind of authoritarian government she had fled to the US to escape.
'I was a political refugee from the Soviet Union 40 years ago,' he said. 'I came here because I am against the exact type of government they're trying to impose here. The secrecy, screaming about leaks, they admire strong arms. 
'Our so-called president doesn't know how government works. He wouldn't pass a naturalization exam. I'm trying to enjoy the democracy while it lasts - nobody can say how long that will be.'
He added: 'All my friends were dissidents. We had no freedom of speech, no freedom to read the books we liked. If United States loses its role in world, there is nothing left. 
'US was always a beacon. I looked at Americans as free people. I absolutely hate what's going on, it's crushing.'
Trump initially condemned the Saturday incident as an 'egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides - on many sides,' a phrase that led many, including those at neo-Nazi website the Daily Stormer, to believe he was tacitly supporting racist whites.
On Monday, under pressure from critics Trump said that 'racism is evil' and described members of the Ku Klux Klan, neo-Nazis and white supremacists who take part in violence as 'criminals and thugs.'
But for some - including many of those gathered to protest in New York on Monday - it was not enough.
Trump later complained about that on Twitter, writing: 'Made additional remarks on Charlottesville and realize once again that the #Fake News Media will never be satisfied...truly bad people!'


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Donald Trump complained that people were not happy that he took two days to condemn a neo-Nazi sympathizer fatally driving into a group of protesters, blaming 'Fake News Media' and calling journalists 'truly bad people'



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Trucks full of sand acted as security barriers ahead of Trump's return; metal barriers were also erected to contain the furious crowds of protesters


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This parody inflatable was erected near the Plaza Hotel, two blocks up from Trump Tower itself. Crowds lined the streets in order to await Trump's return 
The fury at the president wasn't just contained to New York, however.
An effigy of Trump - with swastikas painted onto his trousers - was burned at a rally in Minneapolis held in solidarity with the victims of the Charlottesville violence.
The faux Trump was seen wearing a white shirt and khaki trousers, similar to the clothes he's frequently seen golfing in.
An estimated 1,000 protesters blocked streets and light rail during the action, which was also intended to protest against violence and racism in the US in general.
Many demonstrators gathered at a crossroads in front of the Minneapolis Republican Party office, holding signs that said 'Stop Hate' and 'No Racist USA.'
Also coming under fire was Johnny Isakson, a Republican senator for Georgia who was hit with cries of 'shame' during his town hall meeting at Kennesaw State University.
Isakson was pressed on issues over climate change and the proposed Obamacare repeal, and when pressed to say 'black lives matter' he would only say 'all lives matter'.  He was booed and mocked as he left the stage. 


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The fury with Trump was also felt in Minneapolis, where this effigy of the president - in khakis and a white shirt - was set ablaze during a protest against the racism and violence seen over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia


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Around 1,000 people are estimated to have gathered on streets and railroads, disrupting traffic - including at this junction outside the Minneapolis Republican Party office


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Also under fire on Monday was Georgia senator Johnny Isakson (right) who was hit with cries of 'shame' from protesters (left) during his town hall meeting at Kennesaw State University


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Two protesters jeer at Isakson as he leaves the stage. They had been representing Obamacare, but others demanded Isakson say 'black lives matter' to which he would only say 'all lives matter'

[size=18]After days of silence Trump finally denounces white supremacists




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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 13:38

Freedom of speech is a tricky thing:

Eveeybody agrees with it as long as the opinions conform with your own. But how do we react when others have a totally different opinion? Do we need to sustain everything others say? I'm not talking about sharing other opinions, I'm talking about accepting them, tolerating them.

I can understand that people dream if a better future, about good jobs, no crime, no pollution etc. At the same time we have to accept that our world of work has changed drastically and that jobs with low qualifications disappear because machines and computers do them much better. At the same time immigrants go to university and demand better jobs as well, so there's no way you can think you're the icing on the cake anymore simply because you were born in a certain country and have a certain skin color.
So it has to be somebody else's fault that you're not as successful as others, and you wish you lived in the 1950s when 'the others knew their place which was beyond yours and accepted you as the leader simply you were a WASP'.

We've talked about it so often. Were those days really that glorious? Probably they were for few, but for most of us certainly not. So I see it as the desire for a better world - which is nothing wrong at all. As long as everybody participates, every nationality around the world, every gender, every skin color etc.

To confirm some people in their belief that they are superior to others, sends hate. I still can't evaluate if Trump really is that simple-minded or if he has a certain plan - or if somebody else has a certain plan and uses him.

They sow the wind and reap the whirlwind.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 15:30

Trumps puppet master Bannon is in control he is a racist and hates government.

Trump is just that dumb , this is the man who said he thought being President would be easy.

If he were intelligent hell even half bright he would have condemned the kkk in his first speech not waited two days later. The only reason he bothered two days later
is because the heat was turned on and he had too.

I bet behind closed doors he let the kkk know he didn't mean a word of it just like he did with russia. Only this time the idiot should know better than to say that out loud.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Katiedot on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 16:36

Wait, what? They were burning an effigy of Trump? The president??? Is that a common thing to do in protests? Because for me, that's absolutely massive anger. And he's only been in for how long? Half a year?
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 18:01

Katie _ Where did you see that they were burning Trump in effigy? It's not in the media here as far as I can see - although it wouldn't surprise me if it's true. His approval rating is down to 34% and many, many people really hate him. IMO, after this weekend he's lucky it's only in effigy.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 18:48

Lizzy I think above that might be the effigy I can't tell. Katie a lot of American's hate him he is the worst man we have ever had in the White House.

He is still claiming this is all fake news he is so damned delusional. How can anyone believe that just because they are elected the whole country loves them and agrees with them?

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 18:53


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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 19:35

Sorry. I missed the photo from Minneapolis on my first go-round.  As I said, it doesn't surprise me that they're burning him in effigy. He's earned it. It does surprise me that  it happened in the heartland first. I'd have thought it would have happened in NY, LA or Chicago before Minneapolis.

They've been trotting out the blow-up Trump for a couple of weeks. It's the next generation of of the blow up actual rat that is often used at union rallies. The blow up rat is a lot less ugly than the blow up Trump. Actually, a real rat is a lot less ugly.

Just a thought: The white supremacist idiots claim they'll be marching all over the place this weekend. I have a solution to kill two birds with one stone. Give them permits to march - but only in gang territory with no police protection.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 21:50

A very interesting video - from 1943, but very up-to-date:

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Tue 15 Aug 2017, 22:35

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4793846/Trump-sides-blame-Charlottesville-riot.html

[size=34]Trump's meltdown on race as he says 'both sides' at Charlottesville had 'fine people' and violence was from both sides - then attacks removing Confederate statues saying: 'Is George Washington next?'[/size]

  • Trump turns short question and answer on infrastructure into outburst on Charlottesville race violence

  • Doubles down on claim there was bigotry on both sides by saying there were 'fine people' on both sides - and that left was also to blame for violence 

  • Went on to attack removal of Confederate statutes saying: 'Who next, George Washington? George Washington owned slaves.'

  • Repeated attacks on 'fake news' media as he kept going for at least 15 minutes in lobby of Trump Tower 


By DAVID MARTOSKO, US POLITICAL EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM  and NIKKI SCHWAB, US POLITICAL REPORTER FOR DAILYMAIL.COM
PUBLISHED: 16:57 EDT, 15 August 2017 | UPDATED: 17:23 EDT, 15 August 2017

    


Donald Trump launched an extraordinary and angry defense of his performance in the wake of the Charlottesville riots Tuesday in a free-wheeling, finger-pointing confrontation with the press at Trump Tower.
He lashed out at his critics following a botched response to the weekend's Charlottesville murder, insisting that a violent 'alt-left' mob came to protests ready for war but a dishonest news media is shielding them from blame.
The president even defended elements of the far-right protest, claiming some were 'fine people' protesting against the removal of Confederate symbols. 
'You had some fine people. But you also had trouble makers,' he said during a Q&A session in the lobby of Trump Tower – an event that was supposed to be a press event about infrastructure projects.
'You see them come with the black outfits and with the helmets and the baseball bats,' he said, describing what he said had happened in the Virginia college town.


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Outburst: Trump angrily attacked his critics and shouted over reporters at the free-wheeling question and answer session in the lobby of Trump Tower


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At his side; The expressions of Gary Cohn, head of the economic council, and Steve Mnuchin, Treasury Secretary, suggested they were not entirely on board with Trump's outburst


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 Back in the tower: Trump's appearance in Trump Tower's lobby was the first time he has been in the building since his inauguration. It turned into an angry press conference with him doubling down on his position that both sides were to blame for Charlottseville
While the vehicular homicide of a liberal protester, allegedly by a neo-Nazi who is now charged with her murder, has grabbed the nation's attention, Trump insisted that 'you had a lot of bad people in the other group too.'
He offered the comment as a defense of his Saturday statement in which he ad-libbed that there had been 'bigotry and violence on many sides.'
Those words prompted a second statement on Monday that more forcefully denounced white supremacists.
'What about the alt-left that came charging at the, as you say, the alt-right?' he challenged reporters on Tuesday. 'Do they have any semblance of guilt?'
'Let me ask you this: What about the fact that they came charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs. Do they have any problem? I think they do.'
'And you had a group on one side that was bad and you had a group on the other side that was also very violent,' Trump said. 'And nobody wants to say that.'
'But I'll say it right now.'
'I think there's blame on both sides,' he added as he scolded the political press. 'And I have no doubt about it, and you don't have any doubt about it either.'



Face of Charlottesville: Heather Heyer, 32, a paralegal was murdered when a car was driven at high speed into a crowd demonstrating against the far-right gathering in the Virginia college town. James Fields, 20, from Maumee, Ohio, has been charged with her murder


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Ugly: This was the scene in Charlottesville on Saturday. Trump said that 'alt-left' protesters were to blame as well as the far right


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Trump said of the clashes between far-right and far left: 'What about the fact that they[the far-left]  came charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs. Do they have any problem? I think they do.'


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Clash: Both sides were caught fighting on camera but Trump claimed that the far-left's role in the violence had been ignored as he launched his own ill-tempered attacks on 'fake news'



Not the backing he needed: Veteran far-right leader David Duke seized on Trump spreading the blame to the far-left
Trump's reference to the 'alt-left' is a nod to so-called 'Antifa' protesters, short for 'anti-fascist,' a movement that has seen its own violent protests aimed at conservatives.
But Ku Klux Klansmen and white nationalists in Nazi regalia stole the spotlight over the weekend. The protest was explicitly planned as 'Unite the Right' and sought permission under that name.
Trump insisted Tuesday that many on the political right who gathered in Charlottesville were peaceful protesters themselves who aimed to save a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee from the scrap heap.
The city is removing it in line with many others across the old South, under pressure to renounce ties to slavery. 
'Not all of those people were white supremacists by any stretch. Those people were also there because they wanted to protest the taking down of a statue,' he said.
'So this week it's Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jackson's coming down. I wonder, is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You know, you really do have to ask yourself: Where does it stop?'
Trump challenged reporters to imaging the nation stripped of symbols of its slave-owning Founding Fathers, while conceding that local communities should ultimately decide the fate of statuary dedicated to Confederate war heroes.
'George Washington was a slave owner. Was George Washington a slave owner? So will George Washington now lose his status?' he asked.
'Are we going to take down statues to George Washington? How about Thomas Jefferson? What do you think Thomas Jefferson? You like him? Okay, good. Are we going to take down the statue? Because he was a major slave owner.'
'You're changing history, you're changing culture,' Trump carped, saying of the right's more thoughtful, permitted protesters that 'the press has treated them absolutely unfairly.'
'You had a lot of people in that group that were there to innocently protest and very legally protest.'              
Speaking of James Alex Fields Jr., the 20-year-old white nationalist accused of running down a woman with his car as fellow racists egged him on, Trump called him 'a disgrace to himself, his family and his country.'
He wouldn't say if the murder was an act of terrorism, calling the question a quibble over 'legal semantics.'
But 'the driver of the car is a murderer,' Trump said without naming him. 'And what he did is a terrible, horrible thing.'
He also defended his chief strategist Steve Bannon, whom Democrats and some news outlets regularly clobber as a racialist at the very least who guided the Breitbart News to prominence by kowtowing to alt-right bigots and at worst is a white supremacist.
'He's a good man. He's not a racist, I can tell you that,' the president said, while not offering the embattled Bannon his full-throated approval as he fights to keep his job.
'He's a good person, and I think frankly the press treats him very unfairly,' he said.
Trump said Tuesday that his widely panned insistence on Saturday that there had been bigotry and violence 'on many sides' – an ad-libbed line that prompted Monday's do-over – was a prudent step to make sure his statement didn't get ahead of the facts as investigators knew them.

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'I'd do it the same way,' he declared. 'And you know why? Because I want to make sure when I make a statement that the statement is correct. And ... there was no way of making a correct statement that early.'
'I had to see the facts, unlike a lot of reporters.'
Trump claimed that on Saturday he was unaware that David Duke, the infamous former Klan leader, was present at the scene of the riot.
'I wanted to see the facts,' he said again. 'And the facts as they started coming out were very well-stated.'
'In fact, everybody said, "His statement was beautiful; if he would have made it sooner, that would have been good." I couldn't have made it sooner because I didn't know all of the facts. Frankly, people still don't know all of the facts.'
Duke was quick to take a victory lap, thanking Trump for drawing attention away from neo-Nazis and shining a light on violent leftists – including the Black Lives Matter movement, which Trump never mentioned.
'Thank you President Trump for your honesty & courage to tell the truth about #Charlottesville & condemn the leftist terrorists in BLM/Antifa,' he wrote.
A pair of White House aides said Tuesday, however, that the words 'on many sides/ were spoken off the cuff.
'Those were his own words,' one senior White House official told ABC News, adding that the words 'on many sides' – which Trump said twice – 'were not' in his prepared remarks.
The president frequently adds to his official statements when he reads them aloud – sometimes inserting a line when he appears to stumble over an unexpected phrase, and occasionally embellishing his speeches with throwaway lines for emphasis.
The Twitter president, often shooting first and explaining later in 140-character bursts before most Americans are awake, is known for unscripted moments that can move markets and upset global diplomacy.
But suggesting a moral equivalence between white supremacists and left-wing counter-protesters with an impromptu line got Trump into hot water, since while both sides came prepared for battle only one escalated physical confrontations to the level of a murder.
By Monday the resulting firestorm had backed the White House into a corner and Trump was forced to issue a second more unequivocal statement.
'Racism is evil,' he said then. 'And those who cause violence in its name are criminals and thugs, including the KKK, neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other hate groups that are repugnant to everything we hold dear as Americans.'
During his campaign, Trump's shoot-from-the-hop style endeared him to a public that had grown tired of canned speeches and poll-tested rhetoric.
His pledges to fight for the middle class, expel criminal aliens by the thousands and 'bomb the hell out of ISIS' were political pluses, not minuses.
But as president, Trump's unguarded tongue has made him into a Yogi Berra-like politician, without some of the legendary New York Yankee's eye-twinkle.
In May when he arrived in Israel from Saudi Arabia, Trump went off-script to proudly announce that he had just returned 'from the Middle East' – as though Jerusalem were a European capital.
And last week he strayed from his planned remarks about North Korea and caused a good deal of Pentagon heartburn by pledging 'fire and fury' if the communist nation didn't back down from a planned test-launch of four ballistic missiles.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Wed 16 Aug 2017, 01:25

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4794132/Republicans-turn-Trump-latest-Nazi-rally-comments.html

[size=34]Republicans turn on Trump after he insists left-wing protesters share some blame for violent Charlottesville neo-Nazi rally that turned deadly[/size]

  • 'There's blame on both sides,' President Trump said Tuesday of a deadly Nazi rally in Virginia

  • Some Republican lawmakers quickly shoved back at Trump, criticizing him for saying left-wing counter-protesters shared the blame

  • 'White supremacy groups will see being assigned only 50% of blame as a win. We can not allow this old evil to be resurrected,' Sen. Marco Rubio wrote

  • Florida Republican Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen: 'Back to relativism when dealing with KKK, Nazi sympathizers, white supremacists? Just no'

  • Texas Republican Rep. Will Hurd told CNN that he had a head-hanging single word of advice for Trump: 'Apologize' 


By DAVID MARTOSKO, US POLITICAL EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM 
PUBLISHED: 18:52 EDT, 15 August 2017 | UPDATED: 19:29 EDT, 15 August 2017

    
ts



Republican lawmakers turned on President Donald Trump after he said Tuesday that neo-Nazis and 'alt-left' liberal extremists shared responsibility for violence that turned deadly over the weekend in Virginia when a white nationalist ran over a woman with his car.
'You see them come with the black outfits and with the helmets and the baseball bats,' Trump said in New York, describing hooded counter-protesters who came to Charlottesville to disrupt a white nationalist march.
'What about the alt-left that came charging at the, as you say, the alt-right?' he challenged reporters on Tuesday. 'Do they have any semblance of guilt?'
Trump's words were quickly denounced by members of his own party as a clumsy attempt to draw moral equivalence between Nazis and liberal activists.


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'There's blame on both sides,' President Trump said Tuesday of a deadly Nazi rally in Virginia – bringing stern rebules from fellow Republicans


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Florida Republican Sen. marco Rubio (left) tweeted that 'white supremacy groups will see being assigned only 50% of blame as a win'; Florida Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen tweeted: 'Back to relativism when dealing with KKK, Nazi sympathizers, white supremacists? Just no'


















Rubio's lengthy thread on Twitter laid out a case that Trump was morally equating Nazis with left-wing counter-protesters, and said the white supremacists deserved all the blame
Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio lectured Trump on Twitter about the danger of suggesting anyone other than neo-Nazis shares the blame for Saturday's violence.
'The organizers of events which inspired & led to #charlottesvilleterroristattack are 100% to blame for a number of reasons,' Rubio wrote in a series of tweets. 'They are adherents of an evil ideology which argues certain people are inferior because of race, ethnicity or nation of origin.'
'When entire movement built on anger & hatred towards people different than you, it justifies & ultimately leads to violence against them. These groups today use SAME symbols & same arguments of #Nazi & #KKK, groups responsible for some of worst crimes against humanity ever.
'Mr. President, you can't allow #WhiteSupremacists to share only part of blame. They support idea[s] which cost nation & world so much pain. The #WhiteSupremacy groups will see being assigned only 50% of blame as a win. We can not allow this old evil to be resurrected.'

[size=28]Video playing bottom right...


[/size]





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'There can be no moral ambiguity,' House Speaker Paul Ryan tweeted in a veiled jab at the president



Ros-Lehtinen, never one to mince words, let Trump have it



Ryan's statement was among the most measured to come from Republicans after Trump's free-for-all press conference spiraled out of control


+7


Michigan Republican Rep. Justin Amash slammed Trump for saying there were 'very fine people' on both sides of the weekend's dispute over Confederate tribute statues: '"Very fine people" do not participate in rallies with groups chanting racist and anti-Semitic slogans and displaying vile symbols of hate'
House Speaker Paul Ryan didn't fault Trump directly, but made it clear that he agreed with Trump's earlier statements condemning neo-Nazis and omitting any claim that leftist protesters were in any way responsible.
'We must be clear. White supremacy is repulsive,' Ryan tweeted. 'This bigotry is counter to all this country stands for. There can be no moral ambiguity.'
Florida Republican Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen struck a more aggressive chord, dismissing Trump directly.
'Blaming "both sides" for #Charlottesville?! No,' she tweeted.
'Back to relativism when dealing with KKK, Nazi sympathizers, white supremacists? Just no.'
Texas Republican Rep. Will Hurd told CNN that he had a head-hanging single word of advice for Trump: 'Apologize.'
'Racism, bigotry, anti-Semitism of any form is unacceptable,' Hurd said. 'The leader of the free world should be unambiguous about that.'
And California Rep. Darrell Issa summed up his views, contrary to Trump's: 'Evil thoughts turned to evil acts this weekend. No excuses.'

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Will hurd, a Texas Republican congressman, told Trump on CNN that he should 'apologize'


+7


California Rep. Darrell Issa summed up his views, contrary to Trump's: 'Evil thoughts turned to evil acts this weekend. No excuses.'
Trump insisted Tuesday that many on the political right who gathered in Charlottesville were peaceful protesters themselves who aimed to save a statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee from the scrap heap.
'Not all of those people were white supremacists by any stretch. Those people were also there because they wanted to protest the taking down of a statue,' he said.
'You also had people that were very fine people, on both sides,' he added.
That set off tea party Republican Justin Amash, a Michigan congressman.
'"Very fine people" do not participate in rallies with groups chanting racist and anti-Semitic slogans and displaying vile symbols of hate,' he tweeted.
Ohio Republican Rep. Steve Stivers summed up the Washington zeitgeist as the nation's politics-watchers took a collective deep breath.
'I don't understand what's so hard about this,' Stivers tweeted. 
'White supremacists and Neo-Nazis are evil and shouldn't be defended.'

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Donnamarie on Wed 16 Aug 2017, 04:20

IMO Trump is a racist in his own right.  Decades ago he and his father were charged with housing discrimination in NY.  He continies to condemn a group of blacks who were falsely accused of raping a women in Central Park years ago even after they were exonerated.  He was a major propagator of the birther movement.  He trotted out his racial overtones throughout his campaign.  His father, Fred Trump, was arrested decades ago for being in a Klan rally.  

Though Bannon I think has a hand in shaping Trump's white nationalist views the Donald owns his racism.

Today's press conference was a disgusting display of a man with absolutely no moral compass.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Katiedot on Wed 16 Aug 2017, 09:38

LizzyNY wrote:
Just a thought: The white supremacist idiots claim they'll be marching all over the place this weekend. I have a solution to kill two birds with one stone. Give them permits to march - but only in gang territory with no police protection.
Ha! I like the way you think!
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Wed 16 Aug 2017, 11:30


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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Wed 16 Aug 2017, 13:30

PAN - George can't take credit for that "insight". He'd have to get on line behind anyone who ever lived in NYC, had any dealings with Trump or followed Trump's "political career".

I know his grandfather left Germany to avoid the draft. I wonder if anyone in his family served during WWII, and if they did, which side were they on? I can guess where Donald would have been - running from one doctor to another trying to get 4F status!
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Wed 16 Aug 2017, 20:23

A kkk member said that Trump let a Jew steal his daughter. Now his daughter and her family are targets. I can't say I feel pity for them he is a damn fool. They have secret service they will be well protected it's just the rest of the country that has no protection.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Wed 16 Aug 2017, 21:51

I've seen many demonstrations in Germany and joined some, about local issues like school subjects or bikeways. Last Saturday there was a demonstration of right-wing extremists in the town my husband works. There were about 30 of them, and IMO it's really hard to stand this, to accept that they have this right as well. About 200 others ('left-alt', as Trump would call them) rallied against them, but nothing serious happened.

In Germany we're not allowed to use Nazi symbols like the swastika or do the Hitler salute, nor ar we allowed to deny the Holocaust. I guess otherwise they still would be used by some incorrigible people. You're not allowed to demonstrate masked and are not allowed to take weapons with you (I know that it didn't help in Hamburg at the G20 summit).
So to see these pictures or videos is just unbearable for me. I'm stunned to see that the KKK is still allowed to spread their 'white supremacy' theories, see banners against jews.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Katiedot on Thu 17 Aug 2017, 05:09

carolhathaway wrote:I'm stunned to see that the KKK is still allowed to spread their 'white supremacy' theories, see banners against jews.
I see this as a misinterpretation of free speech. It's not that everyone's free to say whatever they want: free speech is still covered by hate speech laws and nobody's free to say some of the things that are being said.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Thu 17 Aug 2017, 06:00

It's a difficult distinction to make. I think the deciding issue is whether the speech incites or is meant to incite violence - at least legally that's where I think it crosses the line to prohibited speech. Even though the Supreme Court has ruled on it before it's still petty ambiguous.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Thu 17 Aug 2017, 06:29

In general I'd say that your own freedom of speech ends where you hurt or violate others, your own human rights end are limited by everybody else's human rights...
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Katiedot on Thu 17 Aug 2017, 09:35

Yes, I'd agree with that too, carolhathaway. As LizzyNY says, though, it's hard to legislate in law.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Thu 17 Aug 2017, 13:27

Carolhathaway - I agree with you, too, but I think the lawyers argue in court that it is a matter of intent. Was the speaker inciting violence? Did he intend his words to call others to violent action or was he just "expressing his beliefs"?

I guess it's something like the distinctions between intentional and accidental murder (manslaughter). I don't know. I think hate mongering is disgusting and all these white supremacists and neo-nazis should be locked up forever. They have no clue what this country is all about or how lucky they are to live here. We tolerate them. Many other countries would shoot them on the spot!
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by carolhathaway on Thu 17 Aug 2017, 13:44

LizzyNY wrote:Carolhathaway - I agree with you, too, but I think the lawyers argue in court that it is a matter of intent. Was the speaker inciting violence? Did he intend his words to call others to violent action or was he just "expressing his beliefs"?

I guess it's something like the distinctions between intentional and accidental murder (manslaughter). I don't know. I think hate mongering is disgusting and all these white supremacists and neo-nazis should be locked up forever. They have no clue what this country is all about or how lucky they are to live here. We tolerate them. Many other countries would shoot them on the spot!

Lizzy,
that's exactly the point why I refused to study law. I once went to court with my school, and we watched a murder trial with a very disgusting crime and really dislikeable accused. At that point I realized that I could neither defend them, nor could I accuse or judge them. So I opted for lical government law instead, because I think you really need certain characteristics to be really good at that, and I don't have that...
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by LizzyNY on Thu 17 Aug 2017, 14:26

Carolhathaway - Neither do I. I know it's necessary to provide everyone with the chance of a fair trial, but I don't know how you can ignore your personal beliefs and values to defend some of the people you'd have to defend.

Last week the Charlottsville city government tried to move the supremacist's rally to a larger venue where it would have been easier to control the situation. The march organizers sued to keep the march in the original location, claiming their rights were being violated. The ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) defended the supremacists and won their case. The march stayed in the original location and we all saw what happened.

Does the ACLU bear any responsibility for what happened? Did it bother the attorneys that their success in court contributed to the chaos that followed? I guess they're used to being unpopular, because they exist to defend the people no one else wants to defend and I guess that's necessary, but I often wonder how they sleep at night.
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Fri 18 Aug 2017, 21:54

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4803350/Steve-Bannon-White-House.html

[size=34]Steve Bannon is FIRED by Trump after chief of staff John Kelly said strategist had to go - and ousted aide's allies predict 'Bannon the Barbarian' will go to 'war' on his 'globalist' enemies[/size]

  • Another explosive Friday in the White House as Steve Bannon, president's chief strategist, is fired on the advice of new chief of staff John Kelly

  • Retired Marine general said it was time for 'economic nationalist' to go after wild week in wake of Charlottesville

  • Trump agreed and the news emerged as he flew on Air Force One from Bedminster to Camp David

  • Official statement said it was mutual but source told DailyMail.com it was the action of Kelly - who also claimed the head of Anthony Scaramucci 

  • Controversial former boss of Breitbart had become isolated in West Wing and was openly at war this week with economic aide Gary Cohn 

  • Now his old website is expected to go after Trump and the 'globalists' who his allies say forced him out - including Jared Kushner, Trump's son-in-law

  • 'They're going to treat Trump like they treated Obama, since they won't see any meaningful difference anymore,' the source said of the Breitbart website 


By DAVID MARTOSKO, US POLITICAL EDITOR FOR DAILYMAIL.COM 
PUBLISHED: 12:50 EDT, 18 August 2017 | UPDATED: 16:38 EDT, 18 August 2017


 Steve Bannon was dramatically forced out of the White House on Friday in the latest earthquake to rock President Donald Trump's administration.
Bannon leaves at the end of Friday amid competing claims over whether he was fired or quit on his own.
But a senior administration official told DailyMail.com on Friday afternoon as the news rocketed around the world that Chief of Staff John Kelly made the decision and secured Trump's approval.
The White House's official line is that it was a mutual decision that involved Bannon himself.
'White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Steve Bannon have mutually agreed today would be Steve's last day,' a statement from press secretary Sarah Sanders read on Friday.
'We are grateful for his service and wish him the best.'
A source close to Bannon said: 'This week is a good window into what Bannon outside the [White House] would look like: A strong defense of POTUS and "fire and fury" for enemies of the Trump agenda. Get ready for Bannon the barbarian.'
The removal opens the way for a war waged on his West Wing enemies - the group he calls the 'globalists' which included Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law, and Gary Cohn, Trump's chief economic adviser.
[size=16]SCROLL DOWN FOR VIDEO 





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OUT: Steve Bannon was ousted from the White House dramatically on Friday just after midday - with friends say he resigned before he could be fired.


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CONSERVATIVE: Trump's chief strategist was the most conservative voice in the White House


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UNDISPUTED POWER: Retired Marine General John Kelly, Trump's new chief of staff, has now overseen the departure of Anthony Scaramucci and Steve Bannon after the firing of Reince Priebus



How the news broke: Matt Drudge, seen as close to much of the Trump camp, tweeted this message. Minutes later Bannon was known to be out.
Bannon is expected to see Breitbart, the website he turned into a vehicle for his America-first political ideas, turn on Trump 'like they treated Obama'.
One Breitbart editor tweeted one word: 'War.' Its White House correspondent tweeted: 'And kids, that's the day when Bannon the Barbarian was born...' 
The New York Times reports that a person close to Bannon insists Friday's departure was his idea.
A White House aide told DailyMail.com on Friday that Bannon submitted an offer of his resignation on August 7, but would not say whether Trump ad accepted it at that time.   
Trump and Bannon are still discussing Bannon's future, according to the Times.
The move sends the most conservative and lightning-rod leader in the Trump West Wing out after less than seven months.






BREITBART WORLD REACTS: One of its editors, Joel Pollak, tweeted war - and the website's White House correspondent predicted a new era for Bannon

Video playing bottom right...


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'Bannon had one hell of a run,' Internet publisher Matt Drudge tweeted on Friday.
People close to Bannon say he's likely to continue pushing the same portfolio of ideas that motivated him in the White House – only without the restrictions that come with working for the president. 
'Steve is now unchained,' one told The Atlantic. 'Fully unchained.'
'He's going nuclear,' said another 'You have no idea. This is gonna be really f***ing bad.'
In firing Steve Bannon, President Trump has lost his chief ideologue, the man who channeled his base and advocated for the populist-nationalist policies that helped propel Trump to victory.
But he has gained an unpredictable and potentially troublesome outside ally who has long experience running a media organization, and an even longer list of enemies.

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Steve Bannon have mutually agreed today would be Steve's last day. We are grateful for his service and wish him the best.
White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders
Bannon's departure makes him the sixth top-shelf aide to depart since the president' January 20 inauguration, including former national security adviser Gen. Mike Flynn, chief of staff Reince Priebus, press secretary Sean Spicer and two communications directors – Mike Dubke and Anthony Scaramucci.
A well-placed White House source told DailyMail.com on Friday that Kushner, his wife Ivanka Trump, interim communications director Hope Hicks, press secretary Sarah Sanders and senior counselor Kellyanne Conway are all remaining in their current positions.
A senior White House aide had told DailyMail.com on Tuesday that Bannon's job was secure. 'Steve's staying,' the official said then. 
But after that the former Trump campaign CEO who was once executive chairman of Breitbart News took down his guard.
He gave an interview to a liberal magazine in which he contradicted the president's position on North Korea and trashed his more moderate colleagues for their views on an 'economic war' with China.


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NOW HE WILL WANT REVENGE: Staff at his former website Breitbart predicted 'war' and the rise of 'Bannon the Barbarian' looking for vengeance on the 'globalists' who pushed him out- who are seen as being led by Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law, and featuring (second right) Gary Cohn, the president's main economic adviser

[size=18]Trump says 'we'll see what happens with Mr Bannon' at Trump Tower




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Then there was one: Trump in the Oval Office with Mike Flynn, his disgraced national security adviser, and Steve Bannon, his now ousted chief strategist, just after the inauguation


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TOOK ADVICE: John Kelly told Trump it was time for Bannon to go - and Trump got rid of him. The news emerged as the president was on his way to Camp David on Air Force One. One trigger had been a book which portrayed Bannon as the mastermind of Trump's victory
And he tried gamely to frame that interview as a win for the president, claiming to DailyMail.com that the resulting furor drew attention away from Trump's widely panned responses to the weekend's racial violence in Charlottesville Virginia.

THE QUOTABLE STEVE BANNON 


The outgoing chief White House strategist has never minced words. Here are some choice ones.


'The baby boomers are the most spoiled, most self-centered, most narcissistic generation the country's ever produced.' (Gen Y TV, 2011)
'We're the platform for the alt-right.' (Mother Jones, 2016, about Breitbart News)
'Darkness is good. Dick Cheney. Darth Vader. Satan. That's power.' (Hollywood Reporter, 2016)
'I'm a Leninist. Lenin wanted to destroy the state, and that's my goal, too. I want to bring everything crashing down and destroy all of today's establishment.'
'They're wetting themselves' (American Prospect, 2017, about his West Wing rivals)
'Classic honey badger!' (after a presidential debate when Trump made allegations about Bill Clinton's sexual history)
'They are trailer trash. They are grifters.' (News.Com.Au, 2016, about the Clintons)
'When you finish watching the film, you want to take a hot shower. You want to go home and shower because you've just spent an hour and fifteen minutes with the greasiest, dirtiest people you will ever see.' (The Atlantic, August 2016, about the leftist Occupy movement)
'There are some unintended consequences of the women's liberation movement – that, in fact, the women that would lead this country would be pro-family, they would have husbands, they would love their children. They wouldn't be a bunch of dykes that came from the Seven Sisters schools up in New England. That drives the left insane and that's why they hate these women.' (Political Vindication Radio, 2011)

Trump has not yet commented on Twitter or elsewhere. 
Bannon is famously reclusive with his communications, eschewing social media and speaking only to a handful of reporters on a regular basis.
But the president was said on Friday to be furious over Bannon's habit of taking credit for his 2016 election.
In 'Devil's Bargain,' a book by Joshua Green published last month, Bannon is painted as the mastermind behind Trump's ascendancy.
And the president was not pleased.
'That f***ing Steve Bannon [is] taking credit for my election,' Trump recently told a confidant, according to the left-leaning Buzzfeed website.
The book is a look-back on Bannon's role in leveraging Trump's connection with his base last year as his populist economic message attracted middle-class white voters
Trump took pains to avoid backing him too firmly during a press conference on Tuesday, referring to him only as 'Mr. Bannon' while defending him against charges of bigotry.
'He is not a racist. I can tell you that. He is a good person. He actually gets a very unfair press in that regard,' Trump said in response to a question about whether he would keep him.
'We'll see what happens with Mr. Bannon. He is a good person and I think the press treats him, frankly, very unfairly.'
Democrats cheered Bannon's departure on Friday.
'Steve Bannon's firing is welcome news,' House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi said in a statement, 'but it doesn't disguise where President Trump himself stands on white supremacists and the bigoted beliefs they advance.'
'Personnel changes are worthless so long as President Trump continues to advance policies that disgrace our cherished American values,' she added.
Ohio Democratic Rep. Tim Ryan tweeted: 'Good. He had no business being there to begin with.'
And New York Democrat Nita Lowey, said on Twitter that 'Steve Bannon should have never been a White House official, and his ouster is no substitute for moral leadership from the President.'
Hawaii Sen. Mazie Hirono, one of the most liberal members of Congress, added in a tweet that 'it doesn't matter if @realDonaldTrump fires everyone in his administration. He's the problem. #BannonOut'
Ohio Democratic Sen. Sherrod Brown tweeted: 'Steve Bannon should have never been in the WH. He has promoted anti-Semitism, racism and misogyny, embracing bigotry and hate speech.'
Bannon was a far-right outlier in the Trump campaign, helping the president coalesce his messaging around what he called 'economic nationalism.'
That platform, a combination of focusing on growing jobs and refocusing global trade in America's favor, won him broad support in America's heartland.


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SCENT OF DEATH: Saturday Night Live portrayed Steve Bannon as the grim reaper to Alec Baldwin's Trump. But the president was not pleased at his chief strategist getting the attention, it was reported
It's unclear where Bannon will go from the West Wing.
A senior executive at Breitbart News did not immediately respond to a question on Friday about whether its longtime chairman would return.

THE NON-STOP WHITE HOUSE BLOODBATH 


Michael Flynn, national security adviser

Flynn was forced to resign on Monday February 13, over controversy surrounding his ties with Russia. His 24-day-long tenure was the shortest in the history of the office. 


James Comey, FBI director

President Trump sacked Comey in a letter sent to the FBI director on Tuesday May 9. Trump's decision to fire him was on the recommendation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Comey had served as head of the FBI since September 2013.
Sean Spicer, press secretary

On Friday July 21, Spicer announced he was stepping down as White House Press Secretary after a tumultuous tenure. It was rumored the embattled press secretary was pushed out of his position after Trump hired Anthony Scaramucci. 
Reince Priebus, chief of staff


Priebus was fired on Friday July 28 when he was summoned to the president's Air Force One cabin and told he was out. He was then kicked out of the president's motorcade and forced to leave the tarmac in a separate car.
Anthony Scaramucci, director of communications

Just ten days after Trump hired him to take over White House communications, the 'Mooch' was let go, on Monday 31 July. His short-lived role in the White House holds the record for the shortest in history of his position 

But a close associate of Bannon's told DailyMail.com to expect Breitbart to wage all-out war with the White House now that its standard-bearer would be on the outside.
'They're going to treat Trump like they treated Obama, since they won't see any meaningful difference anymore,' the source said of the Breitbart website. 
The online news outlet Axios reported Friday morning that Bannon was setting himself up to be a martyr, a White House nationalist hero forced out by 'globalists.'
Bannon had a net worth of at least $10.7 million when he started his work at the White House, according to financial disclosures he filed with the federal government.
As of late March he held between $1.1 million and $2.25 million in cash in three different bank accounts.
Most of the rest of his assets consisted of his consulting firms and stakes in film companies.
Bannon reported earning more than $1.3 in salaries last year, including $191,000 from Breitbart News. Much of his income flowed through Bannon Strategic Advisors – which netted him about $494,000.
His film production company Glittering Steel paid him more than $167,000 in fees.
Another $125,000 came from a consulting agreement with Cambridge Analytica, a data mining and crunching company where he was a vice president and served on the board.
Cambridge was among the Trump campaign's most oft-used vendors. It is part-owned by the family of Robert Mercer, a billionaire investor who funds Breitbart.
Bannon and Mercer reportedly met on Wednesday for five hours to plot the course of his future.
Bannon, who joined Trump's presidential campaign a year and a day ago as its CEO, was credited with bringing discipline and focus to the then-scattered operation.
He came directly from Breitbart News, where he set the tone for a ragtag journalism operation known for the same kind of right-wing populist messaging that made Trump seem like a native son in any corner of America's heartland where he visited with disaffected white male voters.
A Harvard Business School and Georgetown University Foreign Service School graduate and veteran of investment banking titan Goldman Sachs, Bannon later struck it rich running his own investment firm.
A large part of his lifetime income came from a single deal, arranging long-term residual checks from a then-fledgling TV sitcom called Seinfeld when he helped negotiate the sale of Castle Rock Entertainment to CNN.
Along the way he also produced 18 Hollywood films between 1991 and 2016 – including some conservative ideological polemics like 'Occupy Unmasked.'
Before going to Goldman, however, Bannon was a U.S. Navy officer for seven years.
He served in the Persian Gulf during the Iran hostage crisis, where witnessing the Jimmy Carter administration mishandle an international debacle turned him into a Ronald Reagan admirer.

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Before entering the White House, Bannon also co-founded and chaired the Government Accountability Institute, a nonprofit that helped with the publication of 'Clinton Cash,' a book that outlined Hillary Clinton's alleged financial conflicts of interest during her time as secretary of state.
The book was widely credited with changing the national narrative about the Democrat who then appeared to be a shoe-in for the Oval Office. 
Bannon's months at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue coincided with Trump's most chaotic early period, with internal power struggles, policy missteps and pop culture meltdowns.
 That f***ing Steve Bannon [is] taking credit for my election
Donald Trump 
Liberals, both in office and in the major news media, portrayed him as a villainous bigot – often confusing his claim of being an economic nationalist with the disturbing movement of white nationalism.
His association with the controversial Breitbart website didn't help. He once described it as 'a platform for the alt-right.'
A February Time magazine cover branded Bannon 'The Great Manipulator' for his perceived Machiavellian hand in the Oval Office.
When it mercilessly lampooned Trump's inner circle, 'Saturday Night Live' depicted him as a grim reaper-like skeleton in a dark cape, never showing him with a human face and running an actor's voice through a sinister-sounding audio filter.
In one sketch, the inhuman Bannon persuades Trump, played by Alec Baldwin, to engage in a series of irresponsible phone calls with world leaders.
Afterward, the comical Bannon asks Baldwin's Trump to get up from his desk.
'Yes, of course, Mr. President,' Trump replies, going to a much smaller desk and playing with a plastic toy.
Longtime Trump nemesis Rosie O'Donnell had offered to portray him, even publishing a photograph of herself in Bannon-esque clothing, makeup and haphazardly tousled hair.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by Joanna on Sat 19 Aug 2017, 17:00

Can I ask a naive question ?

Trump Tower.....all glass ?

Looked like the picture of the apartment that the 
Clooneys and the Bergers were buying to me.

Never.......?????   affraidaffraidaffraid
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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by annemarie on Sat 19 Aug 2017, 19:39

Joanna New York is full of glass high rises. No that is not where George and Rande will live.

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

Post by party animal - not! on Sun 20 Aug 2017, 13:44

Boston Police Commander showing the way for a peaceful march

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bsl3S6nSmUs

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Re: The Serious Side - part 2

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