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The Ides of March

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Re: The Ides of March

Post by MyGirlKylie on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 17:31

Thanks for the reminder about Letterman, madsky. Will have to remember to set the DVR.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 17:40

Don't forget what Mel said about Charlie Rose, that's Tues. 11pm, if it's true.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by cindigirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 17:44

Hi patty, I hope someone tapes a video of the Charlie Rose show. I would't stay up that late, not even for George. LOL
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 18:16

Just looked up Charlie Rose's schedule. They list for Mon. and Tues. nite and no George. Bummer. That would have been a good one.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by cindigirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 18:30

Sorry patty. I have videos of old interviews with George and Charlie Rose. Those are a few of his interviews where was actually serious.

Looking forward to seeing Ides on Friday. I'm going to see if I can cajole one of my friends to see it with me.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 19:17

I'll probably go alone. Don't know if my daughter wants to go with me. Last time we went to a GC movie it was The American. I think she was very embarassed to watch the sex scenes with her mother. Don't know if there are any between RG and ERW, but she might not want to take the chance.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by cindigirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 19:22

Oooooo patty, The American is not a good intro to George. IMO The movie was not the best. Don't feel bad, I forcerd my kids to watch Solaris on DVD and I heard lots of groans throughout the whole movie. LOL

Myself being a consummate fan of G I enjoy whatever movie he's in but apprently not everybody feels the same way.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 20:47

Oh, I agree. I'd be happy watching him watching paint dry.
It was the sex scene that threw her. Not that she's a prude, but if I tell an offcolor joke (or send an email that's off color) she gets upset. Her mom shouldn't talk like that.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by cindigirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 20:53

Now I'm sure they realize their mom has 'been to the mountain' a few times. LOL

Wonder why it is kids don't like to think of sex and mom together. How do they think they got there?

I'll probably have to see the Ides alone too. My friends don't think too much of George - but what do they know.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 21:07

Hey, how about we meet somewhere halfway and go together? Might be fun.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by Cinderella on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 21:10

I would love to go with all of you! That would be fun! Laughing
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by cindigirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 21:11

I would LOVE that. Do you ever go to the Commons? I realize that's not half way for you but it would be fun.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Mon 03 Oct 2011, 21:14

Haven't been in years (since hubby died) but willing to give it a try. Hope I don't get lost, I never drove it just navigated. We should probably finish this as a PM if we're going to do it.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by melbert on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 02:51

Apparently George will be on Charlie Rose on Thursday, 10-6-11, and not on Tuesday.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 02:56

Thanks, Mel. Hope you're right. Sounds right.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by melbert on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 03:27

I hope so too!!!
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by LornaDoone on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 04:43

cindigirl wrote:Now I'm sure they realize their mom has 'been to the mountain' a few times. LOL

Wonder why it is kids don't like to think of sex and mom together. How do they think they got there?

I'll probably have to see the Ides alone too. My friends don't think too much of George - but what do they know.


Aliens dropped them from the spaceship?

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Cloning?

Immaculate Conception.

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Re: The Ides of March

Post by Katiedot on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 11:53

I liked this - a local look at the film from a secret preview hosted by Nick Clooney:

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Posted: 4 October

By: Brendan Keefe

CINCINNATI - Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky are major characters in 'The Ides of March' -- the star-studded film featuring Tri-State native George Clooney as actor, director and co-writer.

I was invited to serve as emcee for the Tri-State premier of the film, on condition I wouldn't tell anyone about the private, invitation-only event in advance. I watched the film with, among 400 others, George's dad, retired news anchor Nick Clooney.

In an obvious homage to the region where he grew up, Clooney framed his film with two local universities. The opening scene takes place at Miami, and the film closes at Xavier.

In between, viewers will catch glimpses of downtown Cincinnati, the Roebling Suspension Bridge, the Ohio River and Covington riverfront, The Head First bar and multiple views of the Newport Comfort Suites of all places.

It's a political thriller in which Clooney's character, a governor running for president, must win the Ohio democratic primary for his campaign to survive. That's the setting -- the real story is a morality tale that shows the limits a candidate and his staff will approach in order to win the White House.

The best scenes in this film have little or no dialogue. Philip Seymour Hoffman's character exits an SUV in an alley, and just by his body language and the quickly-departing vehicle, you know exactly what was said inside by Clooney's character.

In reality, Clooney wasn't even in the SUV with its tinted windows. He was behind the camera directing, but you feel the presence of his character and the weight of the news that was delivered.

In another critical scene, Clooney's character receives a cell phone call while standing in front of a cluster of microphones at a news conference -- WCPO's mic flag front and center, by the way. Brilliantly, the sounds of the news conference fade away, and the audience hears only the vibrating sound of the phone.

I won't spoil the surprise for you, but the moment Clooney looks down at the phone to see who is calling, you hear deep 'thumps' with every flash of the press cameras. It's incredibly effective as a storytelling tool. Once again, there's no significant dialogue as the candidate scans the room looking for the person calling him -- someone who can destroy his political career.

The filmmakers did not choose the best time of the year to shoot a movie in Cincinnati -- February and March -- but the city and its environs end up shining through anyhow.

There is another dialogue-free scene when two major characters are driving across the Roebling Bridge. It's an instantly-familiar experience for any local viewer. But it's also disorienting. They're driving from a Newport hotel to an Oakley clinic -- the iconic bridge is hardly the most direct route -- and as the shots change within the car, the couple seems to be driving into Kentucky from Ohio, and then vice versa.

I spotted the twin stacks of the Mike Fink riverboat passing by the driver's window -- a sight seen through the driver's side only en route to Covington.

Also missing is that tell-tale 'singing' of the Roebling Bridge. That harmonic sound of the bridge would have added something to an already-tense scene. That being said, the score was magnificent.

As for a review, I loved the film. The acting is superb. There are two scenes in particular that prove the oscar-worthy performances for Hoffman and Paul Giamatti. Both involve screaming at the star, Ryan Gosling. He may have the biggest role, but Gosling's performance is eclipsed by the many veterans in the film.

A word of warning: the first 10 or 15 minutes of the film had me worried. It starts slowly with no clear indication of the suspense and intrigue that will follow an hour later. But they're worth the wait.

Another wonderful element of the film is the unknown. Again, not to spoil the plot, I will simply tell you a main character dies. But we never really know if it was suicide, an overdose or murder. Later a document on which the entire campaign, and therefore the entire movie, depends may or may not exist. That results in one of the best poker matches ever recorded on film -- the characters don't really know if the other guy is bluffing. And neither do we.

In the end, it doesn't matter. The point is that people make decisions based on perception, not reality.

As a result, the Tri-State is the real winner in 'Ides.' This will be remembered as one of the great movies made right here at home.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 14:33

Wonderful review. Makes the anticipation even greater than it was.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by it's me on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 14:56

but alert: spoilers! I don't want to know too much!


framed by two universities
interesting choice
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by it's me on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 14:59

btw
don't want to be blaspheme but I was surely made by Immaculate Conception
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by Cinderella on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 15:30

Say wha? A main character dies...
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by it's me on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 15:37

stop! please stop spoling!!!!
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by laetval on Tue 04 Oct 2011, 19:35

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Ides of March: George Clooney Chats with Movie Fanatic

George Clooney chose the play Farragut North as his next venture into the double duty of acting and directing. On screen, we know it as The Ides of March and Clooney sits down with Movie Fanatic at the Toronto Film Festival to chat about how after Good Night and Good Luck, the political thriller caught his fancy.

Clooney was the toast of Toronto with Ides of March, but also his poignant turn in The Descendants. But on this day at the Lightbox building in downtown Toronto, Clooney is all about Ides and his stellar cast that includes Ryan Gosling, Paul Giamatti, Marisa Tomei and Philip Seymour Hoffman (most recently seen in Moneyball).

Movie Fanatic: Is there a big difference between George Clooney the actor and George Clooney the director? And is there a secret to being a great director?

George Clooney: He's pretty much the same guy as George Clooney the actor [laughs] -- basically the same height, same hair, pretty much the same. I'm lucky enough to work with a great number of actors who elevate the project. That's the secret to being a great director.

Movie Fanatic: So, what how did you secure such a stellar cast?

George Clooney: I had some pictures of a few of them in compromising positions so I got them to say yes [laughs]. Actually some of them together, but that'a something we'll let you figure out. They liked the script. They wanted to do the part, so you get out of the way.

Movie Fanatic: Did you base your character on any particular politician?

George Clooney: No, there really weren't. Some of the speeches I used were some of the things my dad used to write about in the late 70s in the newspaper. And the idea that he had these issues that he had, seem to pop up every week. People think it's about the John Edwards thing, but this was written before the John Edwards thing even broke.

Movie Fanatic: Do your own political views influence what you do on film?

George Clooney: Not particularly. I didn't think of this as really a political film, I thought of this as a film about sort of moral choices, not about political strife. I thought it was a fun moral tale, and once you put it in politics it sort of amps up the problems. I thought that was fun.

Movie Fanatic: The film makes it difficult to become idealistic. What are you trying to say?

George Clooney: [Laughs] In general it takes about two years to get a film made. Mostly we're reflecting the moods of our country and our world. And if this film reflects some of the cynicism, that's probably good, it's not a bad thing to hold up a mirror to our politicians. But that wasn't what the film was designed to do. There isn't a person you have met that hasn't been met with moral questions. Everyone makes moral choices to better themselves and hurt others along the way and whether the means justifies the ends. And whether that’s on Wall Street -- it could have been better in Wall Street -- anywhere, that was our point.

Movie Fanatic: Do you think the system is broken? Can the two parties in the U.S. get along?

George Clooney: I think it's cyclical. I think we're at a period of time where it's probably not our best moment in politics. But if you look at the things Jefferson and Adams did to each other, the 1800 election was pretty rotten and evil. Things change and are cyclical, so I'm hopeful.

Movie Fanatic: How do you think this film speaks to our world today?

George Clooney: People think that films somehow are trying to lead society. Mostly we're reflecting the moods and thoughts that are going on in our country and around the world. It's not a bad thing to hold a mirror up and look at some of the things we're doing.

Movie Fanatic: Did you enjoy filming in Ann Arbor?

George Clooney: We loved it there. First of all, Ann Arbor is an amazing city. We got there on St. Patrick’s Day and everyone was drinking beer and everyone was screwed up. I was like, “This town was made for me [laughs].”

Movie Fanatic: And you also filmed in Detroit, talk about a town fighting to stay alive…

George Clooney: When you go to Detroit, you see a town that is resilient. They’re just fighting to win again and there’s an energy to that. Just watching a city really fighting to get back on its feet and watching the inner strength of a city is tremendous.

Movie Fanatic: There seems to be so many examples in real life of how what happened in The Ides of March could be tomorrow’s headlines. Do you think this sort of thing happens all the time and did you insert that into your story?

George Clooney: There's just so many ways to get in trouble with this answer [laughs]. There were enough examples that we just picked little pieces of whatever we wanted.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by lovelylois on Wed 05 Oct 2011, 17:14

There are pictures of george in New york on his way to Ides premiere it is on popsugar if anybody wants to down load article. They also mentioned stacy was there but walked in on her own again.

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Re: The Ides of March

Post by cindigirl on Wed 05 Oct 2011, 17:20

The New York Film Festival starts in 11 days.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by laetval on Wed 05 Oct 2011, 20:02

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George Clooney talks with TIME, reveals why he cast Ryan Gosling in 'Ides of March': 'He was cheaper'

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There are plenty of reasons to want to cast Ryan Gosling in a movie: He’s good-looking, charming, capable of driving ticket sales and stopping street fights (not simultaneously, although we wouldn’t be surprised), and, of course, inspires Tumblers... the list goes on. But for The Ides of March director (and star) George Clooney, the decision to cast Ryan in his film came down to something much more basic: “He was cheaper,” Clooney quipped, responding to an audience member during a live 10 Questions interview with TIME’s Adam Stengel on Wednesday. “He hasn’t worked in awhile. I felt bad for him.”
During the sit-down, which also touched the star’s views on politics, advocacy, and the journalism industry, Clooney revealed that Gosling caught his attention early on. “When we were adapting the screenplay, from the very beginning, we had been considering Ryan all along,” explained Clooney. “He and I had long conversations about film a couple of years before so I always wanted to work with him. I liked him. I thought he was smart.”
Clooney, who described Gosling as a “terrific actor,” also said he was intrigued by the up-and-coming star’s career choices. “He’s an interesting actor. He’s now in sort of every movie, but for a long period of time he was sort of the reluctant star,” he said, referencing Gosling’s decision to step out of the spotlight following his breakout success in The Notebook.
Of course, talk surrounding Ides of March was only a small part of the nearly hour-long conversation, which delved into Clooney’s views on everything from the current political climate to Twitter. Some highlights below:
On supporting Obama: “I get angry at people who don’t stand around and stand for him,” he said.
On the Republican party: “Republicans are good at standing by their candidate.”
On releasing Ides of March: “We were actually in pre-production and then Obama was elected,” he said. “We realized everybody was in such a good mood that we couldn’t possibly make this movie now. And then it took about a year. Bad for the country, very good for filmmaking.”
On whether he would run for President: “No. I would run from.”
On his Satellite Sentinel Project: “Omar al-Bashir, who has been charged for war crimes against humanity, has said that I’m spying on him, and I just said, ‘Look, I’m not a country. I don’t have to play by the same rules. I’m a guy with a camera 400 miles up. I’m a tourist taking pictures. And if you have a problem with that, I don’t care.’ You can’t please all the war criminals all the time.”
On Twitter: “I don’t Twitter, because I will drink in the evening and I don’t want anything that I could possibly write at midnight to actually end my career.”
Are you appropriately charmed yet?
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by laetval on Wed 05 Oct 2011, 20:16

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Re: The Ides of March

Post by laetval on Wed 05 Oct 2011, 20:21

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Re: The Ides of March

Post by cindigirl on Wed 05 Oct 2011, 20:23

Thanks laetval for the great photos. You're the best!!!
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by Atalante on Wed 05 Oct 2011, 21:17

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] Very Happy
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by it's me on Wed 05 Oct 2011, 21:35

thank you very much
grazie mille
great stuff
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by watching on Thu 06 Oct 2011, 09:24

Grant talks Ides.

Ides of March' Co-Writer Grant Heslov On His "Old Marriage" To George Clooney

Grant Heslov and George Clooney forged an alliance years before they commanded serious Hollywood clout. Both did their time doing sitcom walk-ons on The Facts of Life the '80s, upgraded to roles on long-running detective shows (Heslov did Columbo, Clooney did Murder She Wrote), and started their feature career with dubious sequels like Revenge of the Nerds III (Heslov) and Return of the Killer Tomatoes (Clooney). When Heslov launched his writing and directing career with the short Waiting for Woody, Clooney—then an ER heartthrob—agreed to play himself. Heslov returned the favor by co-writing and producing Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck., which won the men six Oscar nominations. Now both comfortably ensconced as actor/writer/producer/directors, they've never run out of projects to talk about, following up their under-appreciated military black comedy The Men Who Stare at Goats with the tricky political thriller The Ides of March, based on the play Farragut North. The story of a Presidential candidate (Clooney) who leads his campaign awry, it's apt material for a partnership that's always worn its activism on its sleeve. Their goals haven't changed—but the times have. We ask Heslov about the risk of making a political film in a tensely divided era.

Whose idea was the project?

I guess it was both of ours. I read the play and George read the play, and we decided that we wanted to buy it and try to make a film out of it.

It's political, which means it's going to be divisive. What kind of talks did you guys have about how to deal with that?

We wanted to present a candidate that seemed like a good candidate, like a guy who you'd want to be president. And then we wanted to have him do something terrible, which he does. In that way, we thought we'd sort of take the edge off it a little bit.

Take the edge off meaning—

Well, we take a Democrat and we make him a real scumbag. And he does a pretty dastardly thing, I think, as does Ryan's character, obviously. But the truth is we weren't trying to make a political film. We were trying to sort of write a morality tale set with a backdrop of politics. It happened to be politics. That was the play that we read and that we were attracted to. But this story could take place in Big Business. It could take place in any number of professions. Because it's really more about making the choices that we make, and the idea of what we will do to win—how much of your soul you're willing to sell.

There's a lot of strategy that you ask the audience to absorb.

We try not to explain too much, you know, is our philosophy. We like to let the audience catch up. So we're not too concerned about spoon-feeding, about them having to understand every little nuance of the strategy. I'm more interested in making sure that they understand character and that they know that the stakes are high. Those are really the things, and so we didn't worry too much about the those other beats. I think most of the people get it—most of the people that I've talked to and have seen it, nobody's been like, "I didn't understand!" and "What was going on?"

Other interviewers? They aren't the most honest.

No, I'm just talking about people who've seen the film. People who I know and who I trust. Not that I don't trust you. [Laughs] I mean, you show the film to people because you want to see what the response is. If somebody says "I don't understand"—and if you hear that over and over, then that's something to think about.

There comes a time when the film ceases to be so much about the political landscape and begins to be more about personal drama. That transition feels very smooth, but at the same time, it really highlights the fact that we're dealing with kind of two different situations, kind of two different movies. Was this a concern?

No, not a concern. I mean, you have to set a certain amount of, you have to set the table to sort of shift into that other stuff. And like I said before, I think that politics really is meant to be the backdrop for this larger sort of morality tale. And yeah, it definitely kicks into another gear when all that stuff starts to happen, for sure. And that's what we wanted. I mean, we wanted to sort of, you know, catch the audience sort of off guard and then really just jam them home the rest of the way.

You direct and you've directed Clooney before. But now he's the director. What parameters did you establish on the set?

You know, there really aren't any parameters. I mean, he's the director, and in a film the director is—

The general.

Is the dictator, you know. And George is really good at being very open to hearing all kinds of things. But at the end of the day, it's gonna be his decision. But we've worked together so much, we sit in a room and write together, we have a partnership, we've done this enough so we really have a shorthand: we don't really have to say much.

Like an old marriage.

It's a little bit like that. And particularly if he's in the film. If he's doing a scene and he's acting in it, he'll do a scene and he'll walk up and he'll go and I'll say, "Maybe do one more." And that's just the way that we work.

The dictator, as you put it, makes you feel like you must hold up your part.

Right. You know, the thing is is that making movies—it's not brain surgery, it's not rocket science.

Meaning that it doesn't change the world?

No. Look, art has its place, but, we're not doing open-heart surgery. Nobody's gonna live or die based on the work we're doing. Also, when I say "work," tarring and roofing—that's work. So we're privileged. We're lucky to do what we do. And in that context, it's like, you gotta have some fun you've gotta make it fun and you can't take it too seriously. And that's the context in which we work. So even if it's a deadly serious scene, if you can't laugh at something because what we're doing is so important, I think it affects the work.

But a morality tale set in a political milieu. That actually sounds fairly important.

Well, it's important until you study what else is happening in the world. Not to belittle what we do or to make movies unimportant—because I think they are—but, you know, it's a big world.


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Re: The Ides of March

Post by Guest on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 02:58

So I, now, realized that I was in NYC yesterday. The same day of the premiere in NYC. I probably passed by and did not even notice, to be honest. I would choose to go and see A dangerous Method at Alice Tulley Hall. I don't regret it though. I saw the Fassdong closer than ever. Things have changed indeed...

ps: Melbert, sorry I blew our bet. Didn't go to LA and was in NYC, but didn't bother to look for it. So, it makes you the winner. What I owe?

pps: I just wish I had seen his parents.


Last edited by LouisLane on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 03:32; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : spelling + grammar)

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Re: The Ides of March

Post by Guest on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 03:03

ok, I passed by the theater they had the premiere (just checked online)and it was on the way to the nyff, lol. I understand now why it was crowded and how it made me upset because I almost got there late because of traffic,lol.

ps: lucky me I did not see Stan, lol! cheers Love3

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Re: The Ides of March

Post by laetval on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 08:50

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George Clooney on 'Ides of March' and 'The Descendants'

Oscar-winner George Clooney takes a look back at his career to date, and his two new movies in particular.

At the Toronto International Film Festival, I had two opportunities to hear George Clooney speak. Like a seasoned politician, George Clooney gives press conferences, and gave one for each of his films at the fest. In The Ides of March, he plays a politician, and he also directed. In The Descendants, he plays a father for director Alexander Payne. In both sessions, Clooney shared his diplomatic wisdom about navigating a career in front of and behind the camera.

‘The Ides of March’ is not political.

George Clooney: I didn’t think of this as really a political film. I thought this was a film about moral choices. I didn’t think of it really as necessarily the political side. I just thought it was a fun moral tale. Once you set it in politics, it amps up all the problems and I thought that was fun. I think you need to remember that films don’t lead the way. People oftentimes think that films somehow are trying to lead society. In general it takes a few years at the very least to get a film made. So mostly we’re reflecting the moods and thoughts that are going on in our country or around the world. This film reflects some of the cynicism that we’ve seen in recent times. That’s probably good. It’s not a bad thing to hold a mirror up and look at some of the things that we’re doing. It’s not a bad thing to look at how we elect our politicians but that wasn’t what the film was designed to do.

We’re all as dirty as the politicians.

George Clooney: Honestly the idea was for us that there isn’t a person you’ve ever met that hasn’t been faced with certain moral questions. Every one of us has had that idea of well, if I take this job which is better, I might be screwing over my boss who I like. Everybody makes moral choices that better themselves and hurt someone else along the way. Whether or not the means justify the ends, that to me is universal. It could’ve been Wall Street. It would’ve been probably easier on Wall Street. It could’ve been anything. That was our point.

Don’t fret about the state of politics today.

George Clooney: I think everything is cyclical and I think we’re in a period of time right now where it’s probably not our best moment in politics, in the political cycle. But if you look at the things that Jefferson and Adams did to one another, there’s an awful lot. The 1800 election was pretty evil and pretty rotten so things change. They’re cyclical.

Bringing production back to… Michigan.

George Clooney: We loved it there. First of all, Ann Arbor’s an amazing city. We were there on St. Patrick’s Day and everyone was drinking green beer and getting screwed up. I was like, “This town is for me.” We loved being on campus there. We loved shooting around Detroit and Ann Arbor. When you go to Detroit you see a town that’s just resilient, that’s just fighting to win again. There’s an energy to cities like that. I remember New York went through that in the mid-80’s/early ‘80s. Just watching a city really fighting to get back on its feet and watching the inner strength of the city is just tremendous. We loved shooting there. Could’ve done without some of the weather but that’s nothing we couldn’t take care of.

No personal questions. Look what happened to the guy who tried.

George Clooney: You know, it’s funny. I knew someone would do it. I’m a little disappointed it’s you. Everyone here is a little ashamed of you right now. What’s your name? [Reporter gives his name] Everybody remember that name. Hard hitting interview by Paul. Listen, I think it’s tremendous that you asked the question. Go back and tell your editor that you asked the question.

Back to the political talk.

George Clooney: Some of the speeches I used for some of the things and ideas that my dad used to write about in the newspaper. The idea of him having some of these issues that he has seem to pop up pretty much almost every week in politics so it seemed familiar to us in a lot of ways. People thought it was about the John Edwards thing but this was written long before the John Edwards thing broke. We didn’t really model it after anybody. There were enough examples that we could just pick little pieces from everyone.

A modest director.

George Clooney: Well, let me tell you. George Clooney likes to talk about himself in the third person. Listen, I don’t like to think in those terms. You have to completely separate yourself one from the other. [The director is] pretty much the same guy as George Clooney the actor. I’m exactly the same height, same hair, pretty much the same. I’m lucky enough to work with a great bunch of actors who elevate the project. That’s the secret to directing, working with good people. How’s that for a political answer?

Trying to make ‘70s films today.

George Clooney: Before I did my first film I read Sidney Lumet’s book on directing which is really helpful. It teaches you shortcut tricks like set a shot, the very first shot you shoot, set it even if it’s something you’re never going to use in the film. Set it, do one take, cut, move on, print, move on. Everybody in the crew and everybody in the cast gets nervous because they think this could happen really quickly. It changes the chemistry on set and I thought that was very helpful, especially for a first time director when I was doing it. It doesn’t hurt to watch some of his films. I think Network is a masterpiece. I think he probably had as good a decade as anybody, Pakula, 70s film directors.

How to make George Clooney happy.

George Clooney: To me I really like it when people appreciate the work. I really do. I enjoy good reviews much more than I enjoy bad reviews. I enjoy people celebrating the work but I really don’t have this dying need to collect things. There’s a point in time where you start in this that you do get competitive. You can get caught up in it, you’re trying to compete with people, you realize that’s silly. We’re comparing artists and I don’t understand that. I don’t remember who won the Oscar four years ago or five years ago or what director won or what film won. I remember films. I watch Networkand that was the year, 1976, where it was Bound for Glory, Network, All the President’s Men, Rockyand Taxi Driver. Rockywon. Rocky’s a terrific film. So are those other four films and I remember those films really well. I remember movies. I don’t remember awards. So I like films.

The long road to ‘ER.’

George Clooney: Well, I was on some pretty crappy TV shows. I was pretty bad in them, but you always think of yourself as a film actor. I’m a film actor, I just happen to be doing this crappy TV show right now. Soon I’ll have this great film career that I actually wasn’t having. There’s a period of time where you’re just trying to get a job. Then you’ve got to get lucky. ER was lucky. We were going to be on Friday night at 10 o’clock and we wouldn’t have done a third the numbers that we did on Thursday night at 10 o’clock. That’s luck. When they talk about numbers now of ratings, 17 million people for a show, we were doing 35, 40, 45 million people a week.

Looking at Hollywood with post-‘ER’ glasses.

George Clooney: Immediately I went from obscurity to being able to get a film. I wasn’t able to before. I auditioned a lot and I didn’t get them. So that was luck. It had very little to do with me. I was the same actor I was when I was reading for two lines in a film. Then things change and you start to realize how you have to take responsibility for the roles because you’re going to be held responsible for the whole movie. If your name is on it above the title, then you have to actually pay attention more to not just your part but to the film so that was part of it. I got a good couple of lessons on some not great films. Then I realized I’m going to be held responsible, I better pay attention to the films. That’s when things changed. I had a pretty good run right after that with Out of Sight, Three Kings and O Brother [Where Art Thou?] where it was like oh, I get it. I’ve got to work with really good filmmakers and off of really good screenplays.

Still a hired hand for other directors.

George Clooney: Well, my career path for the last 10 years or so has been to direct, but directing takes a long time to get one done. Ask Alexander [Payne]. It could take a while. My day job is acting and that’s how I make my living. Directing is something that I really want to do, really enjoy doing so in between those, if I’m lucky enough to have Alexander or Steven Soderbergh, or the Coen Brothers or Jason Reitman or Tony Gilroy, really good directors around, then I’m lucky. And that’s what I want to do.

The George Clooney holiday double feature.

George Clooney: I find that it’s a very odd thing to think of competition when you’re talking about what I still consider art. I don’t really think of it as competing and I don’t ever think of competing with actors or filmmakers at all. You do compete in a way at the box office but we’re far enough apart with when both films are coming out so I’m not concerned with that either. Look, we’d like both films to be well liked. We try to make films we’d like to see. They’re not easy to get made. They’re hard to get made. You have to keep the budget low to get them made, but at the end of the day, I don’t really worry about competition because I don’t really think of it that way. I don’t feel like I’m a race with anybody, particularly Alexander because I don’t want to race him. That would be a drag.

The George Clooney Legacy.

George Clooney: In general, I try in my career and I think Alexander has done in his career, I want to do projects that last longer than an opening weekend. That’s it. When they do that thing for you when you’re 75 and they bring out a wheelchair and you’ve got the colostomy bag hanging off the side, you don’t want them to say, “Well, you had 20 films that opened number one.” Who gives a sh**? Honestly, it’s an art form that costs millions and millions of dollars so I understand that it has to make money and I want to make sure it does by keeping the price down, but the truth is I want to make things that people remember. If you’re able to do five or ten of those in your life that last, then you win. Unless somebody steps on your colostomy bag.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by laetval on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 15:00

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George Clooney, political animal in 'Ides'

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LOS ANGELES (USA TODAY) — During the 2007 Oscar campaign for Michael Clayton, George Clooney huddled in a posh Beverly Hills restaurant with a semicircle of reporters, arguing that a black man could be elected president if the country could shake its political cynicism.

Now he's banking that cynicism is back.

Clooney returns today as a co-star and director of The Ides of March. He concedes it is pollinated by memories of his father's failed 2004 run for the U.S. House of Representatives— and the political skulduggery Clooney believes helped defeat his father, Nick.

But the actor, an outspoken critic of the Republican Party and a poster boy among some conservatives who see him as the face of Hollywood liberalism, says Ides' political backdrop should not be mistaken for political sermonizing.

And he's hoping to offend both sides to prove it. He says the story of an aide poisoned by presidential campaigning has managed to win a thumbs-up (and down) from those of all political factions.

"We're offending everyone," he cracks during a roundtable interview with co-stars Ryan Gosling, Marisa Tomei, Evan Rachel Wood and co-writer Grant Heslov. "That's a good thing."

Offense has never been much concern for Clooney, who took a pointed jab at the press with 2005's Good Night, and Good Luck and America's Mideast policies in the thriller Syriana. The latter film earned Clooney a supporting-acting Oscar, and Good Luck garnered a director nomination.

He sees Ides not as a political screed but "a morality tale. At what price do you sell your soul? Is it worth it?"

Clooney plays presidential hopeful Mike Morris, a Pennsylvania governor with Barack Obama's poster artist and Bill Clinton's libido. He and aide Stephen Meyers (Gosling) grapple with finding high moral ground in a primary muddied by shortsighted reporters and unscrupulous opponents.

Democrats, no less.

"I've always been cynical about politics," Clooney says. "I still believe in candidates, in people. But having seen what my father went through, running for Congress, the process is soul-stealing. I got a real lesson from that."

D.C. weds Hollywood

Clooney was ready to deliver that lesson in 2007, after the failed congressional bid and Clooney's work on K Street, the 2003 HBO documentary series about Washington lobbyists. Clooney served as producer of the Steven Soderbergh-directed series and occasionally worked the camera along with Heslov.

Clooney says the election and documentary convinced him of the converging nature of politics and entertainment — and the need to examine it.

"Washington and Los Angeles are one-industry towns," Clooney says. "And there's a pecking order to both. Just as movie stars look down their noses at film actors who look down on television actors, a senator looks down on a congressman, and so on."

The difference, he says, "is that the decisions that are made in Hollywood really don't affect people's lives. The decisions in Washington, D.C., do. We wanted to tell how those decisions get made."

Clooney and Heslov were in pre-production on Ides, an adaption of the play Farragut North by former political aide Beau Willimon, when Obama won the 2008 election. The victory gave Clooney an "I told you so" but shelved the movie for a few years.

"People were just too happy to make it then," Heslov says. "We had to wait for the cynicism to swing back, which it always does. And it did."

When?

The cast, which defers to Clooney and Heslov on most partisan issues, pauses and looks to Clooney, who does not pause.

"The health care debate."

While Clooney saves the movie's fiercest blows for his own character, Morris is a liberal politician in the mold of Kevin Kline's chief executive in Dave or Michael Douglas' rugged public servant in The American President. Morris is pro-choice and anti-petroleum, calling for a ban on gasoline-powered cars within a decade.

Clooney says that while he expects the perspective to rankle some, he believes most audiences won't see the film as a soapbox.

"You're going to get static, no matter what," Clooney says. "But honestly, I think you may be overestimating the reaction to the film politically. Maybe I'm living in my own little world. But with Good Night, and Good Luck, we knew what we were in for. When I did Syriana, I knew what I was in for. I'm not sure that will be the reaction here. It's really, truly a morality tale."

Actors got political counsel

Still, actors received makeshift civics lessons. Clooney gave stars several documentaries to study, including The War Room, about the 1992 Clinton campaign and the people behind it.

Clooney also put Gosling in touch with congressmen from both parties. While Republicans and Democrats didn't mind serving as advisers, "I think they both feared some left-wing attack piece," Clooney says. "So they said, 'We'll talk to you. Just don't use our names.'"

Gosling, who is Canadian, says he found the off-the-record education fascinating if familiar. The world he discovered in Washington varies little from the one he inhabits in Hollywood.

Both are "systems it's hard to be honest in," Gosling says. "I can only relate it to (acting), but it's very hard to be honest on the job. Everything you say is not a real conversation. It's one-sided. Everything you say is taken out of context and chopped up and used for parts."

Still, that didn't mean Gosling wasn't ready to dip his toe into political theater.

"If you're going to do a political movie, you want to do it with George," says Gosling, an avid fan of K Street. "It's in his wheelhouse."

But Gosling says he doesn't believe Clooney "had a political message when he made it; I think he wanted to make an old-fashioned thriller. I think he also wanted to start a dialogue."

Dirty tricks — off camera

Tomei, who plays a reporter on the campaign trail, believes Ides "looks at what's really going on, the absurdity of the (political) process. You have to at least look the system in the eye and not be a baby about it before you can do something about it."

Not that politics dominated the set. If anything, the only one pulling dirty tricks was Clooney, a renowned practical joker. One of his first was to catch Wood, an avid singer and dancer who plays intern Molly Stearns, grooving to Justin Bieber.

Clooney taped the dance moves and has threatened to include them in Ides' DVD extras.

"Every day I came in, I was paranoid George was going to pull another one," she says. "I was constantly looking over my shoulder."

But Clooney saw the need to keep the mood light, given the context of the movie.

"This is about how we elect politicians, what we see, what issues are made big and what issues are made a blurb," he says. "But there's no one political lesson anyone should take away from this. I'm sure there will be some people ticked off on either side."
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 21:16

Okay, gals! Went to see IOM today with cindigirl. Was fun to put a face to the name. We had a great time.

My opinion, the movie was great, suspenseful and very well written. The acting was great, the directing I felt was very well done. Cindi and I both enjoyed it.

Was a new experience from me. We went to a "dine-in" theater. Seats were exceptionally comfortable and although we didn't order anything to eat, they had a full menu to order from. Weren't overly expensive either. Admission was low, too, even for a matinee.

We dined at The Cheesecake Factory after the movie and had a great time talking about "the man in our lives".

Again, movie wasn't a disappointment in any way. Hope each and every one of you get to enjoy it soon.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by cindigirl on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 21:22

Glad you got home safely Patty, I found my car too. LOL

Told you I had a lousy sense of direction. Now you believe me. Turned around, almost walked into the men's room at Cheesecake factory, your guiding hand steered me right.
Doh!
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 21:28

Got home about 3:30 and found out son-in-law is in hospital over in NJ. Daughter was on way to hospital over in Oldbridge. Have to wait and see what's happening.

Well, on to other threads.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by Cinderella on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 22:55

I saw it, too! Very good cinematography! It’s sad that morals have gone so far out the window! I thought it was very good and tells a great story! I also thought the shots were wonderful! Didn’t notice where that one reviewer talked about the bridge in Cincinnati… happened too quick and the only way he could have caught it was to watch it in slow motion and I don’t think they do that during a premier. Do they? Anyway, kudos to George and his group of people for a success on telling a story that possibly could be true in the government/corporate world today!

@Patty - I hope everything's okay! I'll say a little prayer!
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by it's me on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 23:31

thanks Patty and Cindi Give Flowers2
(hope everything is ok there, Patty Hug1 )
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by it's me on Fri 07 Oct 2011, 23:36

those "dine-in" theaters sound strange to me Neutral
good way to have audience
but I like plain silence while enjoying a film
or I would be tempt to Nunchucks those hecklers !
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by davidarochelle on Sat 08 Oct 2011, 03:09

I will be seeing it at Tues matinee. Carol Cling of the Review Journal s one of our most prominent reviewers here in Las Vegas and she gave it a "B" rating which is outstanding for her. Her headline is "star power makes "Ides of March" more about acting than action." Davida-Rochelle
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by lucy on Sat 08 Oct 2011, 04:01

To the two girls, wow you got to see IOM together, how great for the both of you. Will be seeing it on Sunday with my daughter her boyfriend, and maybe my son, can't wait!
Pattygirl, hope all is well with your son in law, my heart goes out to you, have had that experience lately and it is never fun.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by pattygirl on Sat 08 Oct 2011, 04:12

Thanks for the kind thoughts. Excrutiating pain from side down the leg. Couldn't stand or put weight on it. Was in tears (his son said). They said looks like arthritis and xray showed bones could be fusing. Has to have MRI and see an Orthopedist asap. Tomorrow is his 50th birthday and party planned for Sunday is postponed.

Regarding dine-in theater, was very quiet, no noise like in a restaurant. Even when server came to take an order or serve, there was no noise to disturb us. Only thing was the smell of the food was distracting and mouthwatering.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by Katiedot on Sat 08 Oct 2011, 05:32

LouisLane wrote: I saw the Fassdong closer than ever. Things have changed indeed...
Would this site be of any interest to you by any chance? [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by it's me on Sat 08 Oct 2011, 06:54

sorry, but taking an order or serving, even if in a strictly silence (how can you, btw, by signs?) is annoying
IMO


comunque grazie mille Cindi&Patty Very Happy
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by laetval on Sat 08 Oct 2011, 08:10

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Exclusive Interview: The Ides Of March Writer/Producer Grant Heslov

Grant Heslov and George Clooney have been working together for years. In addition to writing Good Night and Good Luck together, the pair both served as producers on the Steven Soderbergh HBO show K Street and they have both produced each other’s directorial efforts, swapping places on The Men Who Stare At Goats and Leatherheads. Now the pair has come back again with their newest film, The Ides of March.

A couple weeks ago I was given the opportunity to sit down one-on-one with Heslov and talk about the new film, which comes out today. Check out the interview below in which he talks about his writing process with Clooney, the complications that come with adapting a play and how they decided that Ryan Gosling was the right actor for the lead role.

This is now the second project that you’ve written with George Clooney. I’m curious about how the two of you work together and did the writing of this movie greatly differ from Good Night and Good Luck.

Well I do all the writing [laughs]. We literally have an office, we go to our office, and we just sort of sit across from each other at a desk and we write it out. There’s no sort of, “He writes dialogue and I write the description.” We really just sort of co-write it together. We hash it out. In this case we wrote, we were adapting from a play, so we sort of had a general idea of what we were going to do. We wrote the scene between Governor Morris and Ryan’s character in the kitchen at the end, we wrote that scene first. So we wrote that scene knowing that this is where everything heads, this is where it all… and then we sort of worked backwards from there.

Was it the same thing as Good Night and Good Luck or was that more constructing the straight narrative?

Good Night and Good Luck was more straight forward because we knocked out the story that we wanted to tell and we wanted to do these three broadcasts, these three big broadcasts, and that one was a little more concise. In terms of differing, no, they were very similar. The experiences were very similar.

When you’re adapting from a play you have a story that comes in script form, which I would assume is much different than a novel. What are the specific challenges that come with that?

Well, plays are plays for a reason. So, you know, they’re very contained, they’re very talky. So you want the essence because we loved a lot of that. You want some of the essence of that, but you can’t have a fifteen page scene in a film, that would just kill it. So that’s a challenge, opening it up. That’s the challenge, to sort of open it up and make it cinematic.

How much changed between the play and the film?

You haven’t seen the play?

I haven’t, no.

George’s character doesn’t exist, the candidate doesn’t exist in the play. So there’s that. And the play only takes place in two or three places: a hotel room, a bar, and a restaurant or an office.

So they never go into the campaign office.

Umm, I’m trying to remember now if they do or not. I don’t recall. But all of the plotting that went on in the film, all the stuff. The play is really just about Ryan’s character and sort of his demise. And in the play he ends up sort of a broken man on stage, and we weren’t interested in that. We wanted a morality tale. We wanted this big sort of morality tale but we also wanted him to win in the end because we wanted him to win at all costs.

Do you see him as sort of an anti-hero?

In this? I didn’t see him when we made it, but as I see some audience response to it, it seems like a little bit that he is.

During your research process, I assumed you did quite a bit of research for this project…

Well George and I worked with Steven Soderbergh on a series for HBO a few years back called K Street, so we were in D.C. for months living there. So that was that was our research.

Was there anything about the process that really took you by surprise?

Nothing took me by surprise, because if you read the news… I’ll tell you what took me by surprise more was how much more fun the republicans were to hang out with than the democrats.

Really?

That surprised me. That was probably the biggest surprise.

Fun in what sense?

They were just more fun to hang out with. They were less uptight and I would have thought the opposite. But it just seemed for fun to hang out with the republicans.

I do also want to ask about the casting process a bit, because I know that when the project was first coming together Chris Pine and Leonardo DiCaprio were suggested for the lead. How was Ryan Gosling chosen?

Well, we always wanted Ryan. We developed the project and Leonardo DiCaprio’s company was on as well because the studio partners up. So we wanted Leo to do it, but we sort of figured that he wasn’t going to do it for a bunch of reasons – mostly schedule but also we were making a very lean, small film and we always just thought that if Leo didn’t do it that Ryan is the guy.

What was it about Ryan?

I think he is the best actor of his generation, you know? And he has the right amount of heart and at the same time sort of toughness that we wanted the character to have.

And beyond Ryan the cast you have for this film is absolutely outstanding – Paul Giamatti, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Marisa Tomei, Evan Rachel Wood. When you were writing the script did you have any of those names in mind?

We thought of Philip Seymour Hoffman, we thought of Giamatti and we thought of Marisa when we were writing. And Evan, George said, “I want Evan Rachel Wood to play the intern. We were very lucky because it doesn’t usually work that way, that you get who you actually want.

So what was your reaction when you first found out they were all on-board?

Well it was cool, but then there was that, “How do we make this work?” because I can’t pay them anything and schedules and everything else, so that’s where the producorial aspect came in. Everybody is doing it for no money and… it was a passion project for everybody.

How fast was the production?

It went fast! It was like four months and we were shooting.

We were talking to Evan Rachel Wood earlier and she was saying that she was playing a small role but her part was spread out over the span of a couple months. Was that a typical thing with all of the actors or was it a special case for her?

Well with Evan it was okay because Evan was like, “I’m on board and I’m not scheduling anything else,” so it was easiest with her. Marisa Tomei was doing a play, she was rehearsing a play, so she had to go back and forth. Giamatti and Phil Hoffman we sort of shot out in like two weeks, relatively quickly. George we had all the time, Ryan we had all the time. Listen, I’ve worked on films that have been much more… when we did Leatherheads with John Krasinski he was doing The Office so we had to shoot around his schedule and stuff. But we’re pretty good about it and we’re pretty sympathetic to it because we’ve both have been actors, we’ve both been in that position where you try and juggle two productions at once.

This film is coming out just as the next presidential race is starting to heat up, which is really just perfect. With that in mind, what do you want people to take away from watching this film?

You know, I don’t know. I think that people are going to read a lot more into what we want them to take from it then what we intended. I think we wanted to make a sort of a solid, dramatic thriller and that politics… we set it in politics because we had this play. We could have set it in big business, we could have set it at Fox. The main thing is that I want audiences to go on and have a good ride. But, I mean, if they sort of take away the idea that politics is a messy business – I mean, everybody knows that anyway, we’re not reinventing the wheel with that – so I don’t know exactly… I would be lying if I told you I knew what I wanted the audience to take away. We purposely left it ambiguous at the end, and I think that helps create discussion and that I like.
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Re: The Ides of March

Post by laetval on Sat 08 Oct 2011, 09:21

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Elyria High grad has speaking role in Clooney’s new movie

ELYRIA — Kathy Wainwright was clearly thrilled to be watching her daughter in a George Clooney movie, but the whole thing felt a bit strange.

“It was a very surreal feeling,” she said. “You know that’s you daughter but you can hardly believe it. To see her up on the screen is pretty awesome.”

Wainwright, a recently retired music teacher from the Elyria Schools, was describing seeing daughter Lauren, a 2008 Elyria High graduate, on a local multi-plex movie screen as she shared a scene with George Clooney in the new political drama “The Ides of March,” which opens this weekend in area theaters.

A musical theatre major at Oakland University near Detroit, Lauren Wainwright, 20, takes her bow as a professional film actress in the film, which casts Clooney as a presidential candidate who must contend with the consequences of dirty politics as learned by an idealistic young campaign staffer played by Ryan Gosling.

Shot in Ohio, Kentucky and Michigan, the film sees Wainwright portraying a college student who presses Clooney’s character in one scene for his views on gay marriage during a campaign rally.

Anticipating the moment she and Lauren’s father Mark, who is also a music teacher in the district, would first glimpse their daughter onscreen was a bit stressful.

“Sitting there as parents, we were watching the show and saying ‘OK, is this going to be it? Is the next scene the one?’ We had no idea where her scene was,” Kathy Wainwright said.

The wait was worth it.

“It’s a pretty substantial scene,” Wainwright said. “There’s actually a lot going on.”

Although the camera moves between Lauren — listed in the credits as “Student No. 1” — asking questions of Clooney to action involving other characters, “you see George and hear Lauren’s voice underneath,” her mother said.

Lauren’s parents attended a midnight screening of the movie Thursday, and planned to catch the movie again Friday night with friends.

“The film is really good, it really is,” Kathy Wainwright said.

“She’s firing off these questions and at one point somebody wants to stop her and move on to someone else,” Kathy Wainwright said. “But Clooney says ‘No, let her finish. I want to hear this.’ ”

The scene builds to a dramatic moment as Wainwright’s character and the rest of the campaign audience waits to hear how Clooney’s presidential hopeful answers her pressing questions about gay marriage.

Lauren, who is contractually prevented from discussing her association with the film, landed the role after a video audition got the attention of Clooney, who also directs the film. The audition was her first for a movie role.

“When she first called us and told us she got the part, we were screaming and crying,” Kathy Wainwright said.

Reflecting on her daughter’s achievement some months later, Kathy Wainwright spoke of it as a huge payoff for all the time spent supporting and encouraging Lauren’s artistic pursuits.

“As a parent, you want your children to succeed in whatever they are passionate about,” she said. “It came crashing down on me,” Wainwright said, recalling “all that time I was sitting in her dance classes and taking her to violin lessons, and taking food to her at Elyria High in between (play) rehearsals so she could have dinner. It was worth it.

“What’s even cooler is this is so permanent,” Wainwright said of Lauren’s movie debut. “It will always be there.”
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