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Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

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Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

Post by Mazy on Fri Oct 25 2013, 04:27

Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

GEOFFREY YORK
JOHANNESBURG — The Globe and Mail
Published Tuesday, Oct. 22 2013, 9:45 PM EDT
Last updated Wednesday, Oct. 23 2013, 8:58 AM EDT

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At the Nyala airport in Darfur, a Petronas fuel truck supplies fuel to an Antonov An-26 military aircraft from the Sudan Armed Forces on April 17, 2012. Sudanese soldiers in uniform are also visible in the photo. Researchers and human-rights groups say the fueling of SAF aircraft by Petronas is a violation of the United Nations arms embargo on Darfur.

One of the biggest investors in Western Canada’s energy boom is facing accusations of violating a United Nations arms embargo by providing fuel to military aircraft that attack civilians in war-torn Darfur.

Petronas, the state-owned Malaysian oil and gas company, has announced plans for $36-billion in British Columbia investments. But human-rights and arms experts say the company has provided fuel to Sudanese bombers and ground-attack aircraft in Darfur, raising the question of whether Ottawa should be taking a closer look at the human-rights record of potential investors.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper, visiting Malaysia this month, said he views the Petronas investment “very positively” and is “very excited” that Petronas might expand its investments.

A spokesman for Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird, asked this week about the alleged embargo violations by Petronas, said, “Canada expects that international sanctions, including those on Sudan, will be complied with.”

Photos obtained by The Globe and Mail show a Petronas fuel truck at Nyala airport in Darfur on April 17, 2012, and Dec. 28, 2011, supplying fuel to An-26 and Su-25 aircraft of the Sudan Armed Forces (SAF). Antonovs are often used as improvised bombers in Darfur, and Su-25s often fire air-to-ground rockets in the region.

The UN Panel of Experts on Sudan, authorized by the UN Security Council to monitor the embargo, has said that the supply of aviation fuel for military purposes is a violation of the embargo.

“I have no hesitation in saying that Petronas is supplying fuel to SAF military aircraft,” said Mike Lewis, an aviation expert who served on the UN Panel of Experts in 2011. The company’s activities in Darfur are “no secret” and easily visible to visitors at the airport, he added.

Sudan, which has attacked villages in Darfur in some of the worst mass killings of recent times, has been subject to the arms embargo since 2004. An estimated 300,000 people have died and 1.4 million left homeless in Darfur, where Khartoum is trying to crush a rebel uprising.

Sudan’s bombing and missile attacks in Darfur have been documented repeatedly by the UN Panel of Experts over the past six years, including in its latest report this year. Its research has also put Petronas under the spotlight. In a 2007 report, the panel said Petronas was fuelling Sudan’s aircraft in Darfur. The panel has cited other companies, including Chinese and Russian arms suppliers, for providing weapons to Sudan.

Petronas spokesman Azman Ibrahim, contacted by The Globe and Mail by e-mail, was asked whether the company had violated the UN arms embargo and whether it refueled military aircraft in Darfur. He promised a response, and later said the company did not have any comment.

In an e-mail last year to the Small Arms Survey, an independent Swiss-based research group that gets funding from Canada and other governments, Petronas acknowledged that its Sudan subsidiary provides “refueling services” in Darfur. It described Nyala as a “civilian airport,” but said the Sudanese aviation authority “from time to time takes control of the operation of the services.”

Sudan restricts access to Darfur, making it difficult for journalists to travel freely there. But a Small Arms Survey report last year said photos at Nyala airport showed military aircraft “apparently being refueled on the airport’s military apron” by Petronas.

Alex Neve, secretary-general of the Canadian branch of Amnesty International, said Petronas should not be fuelling military aircraft in Darfur. “There’s no possible justification for it, no excuses for it,” he said in an interview. “It’s troubling to see their response, which is that they have a civilian business at the airport and so be it if once in a while the military takes over. Shrugging shoulders is not due diligence.”
Mr. Neve said Ottawa needs to take a closer look at the human-rights records of companies such as Petronas when it is reviewing foreign investments. “We’re faced more and more with takeovers in Canada by companies that have questionable human-rights records,” he said.

Last year, after a protracted delay, Ottawa gave approval to Petronas for a $5.2-billion takeover of Progress Energy Resources Corp., a Calgary-based natural gas producer. The acquisition was among $36-billion in Petronas investments announced this month by Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, who said it amounts to “the largest direct foreign investment in Canada by any country.”

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Re: Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

Post by it's me on Fri Oct 25 2013, 06:30

it's important they knew it

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Re: Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

Post by Mazy on Sat Oct 26 2013, 01:25

UPDATE
Petronas Must Comply With UN Sanctions Before Investing In Canada Amnesty International

Company has supplied fuel to Sudanese air force in Darfur
BY PETER O'NEIL, VANCOUVER SUN OCTOBER 23, 2013

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Prime Minister Stephen Harper has been upbeat about investments in Canada by Petronas, even appearing at an event in Malaysia recently where he and his Malaysian counterpart touted the invement.
Photograph by: FRED CHARTRAND , THE CANADIAN PRESS


OTTAWA — The federal and B.C. governments should insist that Petronas, Malaysia’s state-owned energy giant, adheres to international human rights standards, Amnesty International said Wednesday.

Petronas plans to spend billion in Canada’s liquefied natural gas industry.

Amnesty’s call came after a newspaper report alleging Petronas is violating a United Nations arms embargo by providing fuel to Sudanese air force jets at Nyala Airport in Sudan’s bloodied Darfur region.

In Malaysia earlier this month, Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his Malaysian counterpart Najib Razak touted Petronas’s plans to invest $36 billion in Canada, including developing an LNG plant in Prince Rupert.

Amnesty spokesman Alex Neve, responding to a Globe and Mail report that Petronas has for years supplied jet fuel in Darfur, said Ottawa and Victoria should be taking a hard line.

“The federal and B.C. governments must use all opportunities to raise these concerns on a continuing basis with Petronas, and the Malaysian government, and make it clear that Canada expects companies operating or investing in Canada to comply with international law,” said Neve, secretary-general of Amnesty’s branch in Canada.

A Canada-supported UN arms embargo has been in place since 2004, in response to the brutal suppression of rebel groups by the Sudanese military that has left many civilians dead, injured or displaced.

A United Nations “Panel of Experts” reported in 2007 that Petronas was one of two companies providing jet fuel in Darfur.

Small Arms Survey, a Geneva-based publication, recently published a survey of military resources flooding into Darfur between 2009 and 2012 despite the embargo. Petronas fuel trucks, according to SAS, were photographed in Nyala airport fuelling the Sudan Air Force’s Antonov transports and Sukhoi fighter jets in late 2011.

Many non-governmental organizations have reported that the Sudanese air force has for years bombarded civilian targets in Darfur and other regions were rebels are active.

Petronas, which didn’t immediately respond to an email from The Sun Wednesday, sent a statement to Small Arms Survey saying that a subsidiary, Petronas Marketing Sudan Ltd., “provides refuelling services at the Nyala airport, which is a civilian airport.”

The statement noted, however, that the Sudan Civil Aviation Authority occasionally controls these services, “particularly during certain situations it deems fit to do so.”

Neve said Petronas’s defence doesn’t wash.

“Providing aviation fuel in a place like Darfur, riddled with conflict and abuses, is fraught with the very real likelihood of being drawn into grave human rights violations, not to mention the possibility of breaching UN sanctions,” he said in an email. “It would require the greatest of due diligence to stay clean. Petronas’s responses and attitude suggest that has not at all been a top priority.”
Rick Roth, a spokesman for Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird, said the federal government “expects that international sanctions including, those on Sudan, will be complied with.”

The UN sanctions include a prohibition on the export of arms and “related material” to anyone in Sudan, as well as a ban on the “provision, to any person in Sudan, of technical assistance related to arms and related material,” according to the Foreign Affairs department’s website.

Petronas describes itself on its website as a Fortune 500 company, with more than 30,000 employees in 32 countries, that is committed to an “ethical, law-abiding” corporate culture.

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Re: Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

Post by Carla97 on Sat Oct 26 2013, 12:53

Interesting. Not familiar with Petronas.

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Re: Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

Post by Mazy on Sat Oct 26 2013, 23:01

How much do you think a life is worth to them? Not much

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Re: Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

Post by Mazy on Mon Nov 04 2013, 14:27

UPDATE
Malaysia’s Petronas Confirms Dispensing Of Fuel For Sudanese Military, Aid Flights
GEOFFREY YORK
JOHANNESBURG — The Globe and Mail
Published Friday, Oct. 25 2013, 8:04 PM EDT
Last updated Friday, Oct. 25 2013, 8:07 PM EDT


Malaysian oil and gas producer Petronas has confirmed that it provides fuel to Sudanese military aircraft in Darfur, despite a United Nations embargo, but it says it also supports humanitarian aid flights in the war-torn region.

Petronas, one of the biggest investors in Western Canada’s energy boom with $36-billion in planned investments, is facing criticism from human rights groups for its business links to the Sudanese military, which often bombs civilians in Darfur.

The state-owned Malaysian company, which earlier had declined to comment, issued a statement on Friday in response to a Globe and Mail report on its Darfur connections. It said it rejects any suggestion that its human rights record in Darfur is “questionable.”
Petronas confirmed that its Sudan subsidiary has been supplying aviation fuel at Nyala Airport in Darfur since 2007, but it said the fuel was primarily for civilian flights and humanitarian flights by the region’s UN and African Union peacekeeping mission (UNAMID). Its contract was recently renewed for another five years, it said.

The embargo was imposed by the UN Security Council in 2004 in an attempt to prevent Khartoum from dropping bombs and missiles on villages in Darfur, where the government is trying to crush a rebel uprising. The conflict has left an estimated 300,000 dead and 1.4 million homeless.

The supply of aviation fuel in Darfur for military purposes is a violation of that embargo, according to the UN Panel of Experts on Sudan, the monitoring body set up by the Security Council. Petronas said the Sudanese authorities sometimes take control of the Darfur airport and give directives to fuel suppliers, including directives to refuel Sudan’s military aircraft, and Petronas feels legally obliged to comply. “The only alternative would be to cease operations altogether,” it said, noting that this would also deny fuel to the humanitarian flights.

Alex Neve, secretary general of the Canadian branch of Amnesty International, rejected the company’s arguments. “The fact that assisting UNAMID is commendable does not excuse or justify those embargo violations,” he said in an e-mail on Friday. “Petronas must ensure that it is not drawn in or compelled in any way – directly or indirectly, frequently or occasionally – to breach the embargo by refuelling Sudanese military aircraft,” he said. “Petronas must arrange its business in a way that will avoid that possibility.”

Mike Lewis, a former member of the UN Panel of Experts, also disagreed with the Petronas explanation. “Supporting an international peacekeeping mission does not justify sustaining embargoed military equipment, just as supplying weapons to the peacekeepers could not be a justification for also supplying weapons to Darfur’s rebel groups,” he said.

He rejected the argument that the Petronas fuel supply to the UNAMID mission is irreplaceable. “It’s worth noting also that UNAMID have their own fuel distribution tankers for other kinds of fuel used by the mission.”

Canadian rights activists are calling for greater scrutiny of the human rights records of companies such as Petronas before they are allowed to invest in Canada.

A spokesman for Foreign Minister John Baird, asked whether the government is satisfied with the Petronas response, said: “The Minister has seen today’s statement, and has asked officials to follow-up on their response.” Earlier in the week, when asked about the alleged embargo violations by Petronas, the spokesman had said that “Canada expects that international sanctions, including those on Sudan, will be complied with.”

Prime Minister Stephen Harper, who visited Malaysia earlier this month, said he views the Petronas investments in Canada “very positively” and is “very excited” by possible further Petronas investments.

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Re: Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

Post by party animal - not! on Mon Nov 04 2013, 14:41

So...let me get this straight....Petronus Oil (Malaysian company) with links (oil?) to Canada, are supplying Al Bashir's military aircraft used to bomb his own people in Darfur, South Kordafan, Nuba and threatening South Sudan, as evidenced by Satellite Sentinel, whilst also refuelling the UN's aid planes who supply food and water to those very people who are being attacked?? Is that right??

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Re: Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

Post by Mazy on Mon Nov 04 2013, 15:05

You and me and then try to justify their actions.

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Re: Major Player In Canadian Energy Sector Accused Of Violating Sudan Arms Embargo Add To ...

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