Log in

I forgot my password

Our latest tweets
Free Webmaster ToolsSubmit Express

The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

View previous topic View next topic Go down

The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by Mazy on Mon Aug 12 2013, 04:09

The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur
Economic imperatives are now a major driving force for escalating violence in Darfur. Drawing on firsthand interviews with refugees on the Chadian border with Darfur, as well as many others inside Sudan, this report challenges the oversimplification of inter-tribal disputes and highlights the Sudanese government’s role and ongoing interest in the latest rounds of violence.

By John Prendergast, Omer Ismail, Akshaya Kumar | Aug 8, 2013

Darfur is burning again, with devastating results for its people. A kaleidoscope of Janjaweed forces are once again torching villages, terrorizing civilians, and systematically clearing prime land and resource-rich areas of their inhabitants. The latest ethnic-cleansing campaign has already displaced more than 300,000 Darfuris this year and forced more than 75,000 to seek refuge in neighboring Chad, the largest population displacement in recent years.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

An economic agenda is emerging as a major driver for the escalating violence. At the height of the mass atrocities committed from 2003 to 2005, the Sudanese regime’s strategy appeared to be driven primarily by the counterinsurgency objectives and secondarily by the acquisition of salaries and war booty. Undeniably, even at that time, the government could have only secured the loyalty of its proxy Janjaweed militias by allowing them to keep the fertile lands from which they evicted the original inhabitants. Today’s violence is even more visibly fueled by monetary motivations, which include land grabbing; consolidating control of recently discovered gold mines; manipulating reconciliation conferences for increased “blood money”; expanding protection rackets and smuggling networks; demanding ransoms; undertaking bank robberies; and resuming the large-scale looting that marked earlier periods of the conflict.

Recently, many Janjaweed groups, including those incorporated into the Sudanese government’s Border Guards and Central Reserve Police, have slipped out of government control as patronage networks have shrunk with declining government budgets. Janjaweed militias have increasingly undertaken criminal activities to make up for lost revenues. During the past six months, the regime has sought to bring many of their favored Janjaweed elements back into closer alliance around shared objectives. Throughout 2013, in addition to attacking Fur, Masalit, and other non-Arab ethnic groups,some of the regime’s favored Janjaweed militias have also targeted civilians from Arab tribes that were historically aligned with the government. The newly expanded scope of violence in Darfur is tied to the emergence of pressing economic imperatives, largely triggered by the loss of oil revenues following South Sudan’s secession in 2011.As the government struggles to develop alternative revenue streams and to pacify the increasingly restless Janjaweed militias, Sudanese government officials are increasingly willing to fan the flames of violence, even against some of their erstwhile allies.

Since the regime in Khartoum, Sudan, denies journalists, aid workers, and U.N. peacekeepers access to locations where civilian targeting is frequent, the killing, looting, and burning occurs in an information blackout.As a result, journalists and diplomats have mostly accepted the Sudanese government’s explanation that the latest resurgence of violence is the inevitable product of intractable “inter-tribal” hatred between groups. Circumscribed by restrictions from Khartoum, the African Union – United Nations Mission in Darfur, or UNAMID, provides minimal protection to civilians and has not yet adjusted to the deepening economic and security drivers of the rapidly intensifying conflict.

Though it is true that competing Arab groups have clashed in the past, the Sudanese government’s role in exacerbating recent disputes and benefiting from the growing intercommunal strife is being ignored. Drawing on firsthand interviews with refugees on the Chadian border with Darfur, as well as many others inside Sudan, this report challenges the oversimplification of intertribal causes and highlights the Sudanese government’s role and ongoing interest in the latest rounds of violence.

In light of the comprehensive roots of the problems in Darfur, we recommend a way forward that would prioritize the creation of a comprehensive peace process that addresses all of Sudan’s conflicts in one forum, maximizing participation from a wide swath of elements of civil society, opposition, rebels, and government. Unfortunately, the African Union Peace and Security Council recently took a step in the opposite direction, calling for increased international support for the failed Doha Document for Peace in Sudan, aprocess that stovepipes Darfur’s conflict, promotes divisive deals with small rebel splinter factions, and leaves the main rebels out of the process. The United States, which has along history of rhetorical support for a comprehensive approach, now must act with bold diplomacy to promote a solution for the grievances of all Sudanese and provide new support to those elements inside Sudan that are on the front lines of the struggle for peace and democracy.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

Mazy
Achieving total Clooney-dom

Posts : 2883
Join date : 2012-11-03

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by it's me on Mon Aug 12 2013, 09:05

It's a big f mess

Kudos to ppl who still care for those poor human beings

it's me
George Clooney fan forever!

Posts : 16792
Join date : 2011-01-03

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by mosaic on Mon Aug 12 2013, 11:51

As the government struggles to develop alternative revenue streams and to pacify the increasingly restless Janjaweed militias, Sudanese government officials are increasingly willing to fan the flames of violence, even against some of their erstwhile allies.
Wow.


mosaic
Clooney Addict

Posts : 174
Join date : 2013-05-14

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by party animal - not! on Mon Aug 12 2013, 11:56

My comments on the other Darfur thread currently running apply here too.....

party animal - not!
Zip a dee Clooney!

Posts : 7577
Join date : 2012-02-16

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by Carla97 on Mon Aug 12 2013, 13:14

Crazy situation and no end to it in sight. Not going to guess what can´t be done.

Carla97
Clooney-love. And they said it wouldn't last

Posts : 1891
Join date : 2013-07-09

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by Juliette Hardy on Mon Aug 12 2013, 13:57

Foreign (UN) intervention required immediately.
Regulation over extensive period of time by peace-keeping forces.
Punitive measures against perpetrators of crimes.
Long term implementation of self-defence strategies, so the new nation can inevitably become self-sufficient & obliterate genocide.

the Sudanese regime’s strategy appeared to be driven primarily by the counterinsurgency objectives and secondarily by the acquisition of salaries and war booty
UN foreign  intervention is only immediate solution.

Juliette Hardy
Clooney-phile

Posts : 686
Join date : 2013-02-01

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by Carla97 on Mon Aug 12 2013, 15:31

Your recipe sounds alright. Smile

Carla97
Clooney-love. And they said it wouldn't last

Posts : 1891
Join date : 2013-07-09

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by party animal - not! on Mon Aug 12 2013, 15:55

They are already there - seven of them were killed and 17 injured in the South of Darfur a couple of weeks ago. It's a combined UN and African force called Unamid Those who were killed were Tanzanian.

Such a huge area to cover, and so many problems with Al Qaeda. Niger, Mali and Chad are all neighbours

party animal - not!
Zip a dee Clooney!

Posts : 7577
Join date : 2012-02-16

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by Mazy on Mon Aug 12 2013, 18:25

I remember George saying once in an interview that it wasn't cut and dried; you have to understand the complex political systems that are in place in Africa. Apparently evil ones like alBashir also don't adhere to other's laws. However his day is coming if you read the last article in his thread. The others are all going to get on board with not protecting him any more. When the smoke clears they want to be able to claim innocence to the same atrocities; which many aren't.

Things aren't going to change over night but if they arrested alBashir; the most well known and biggest perpetrator of war crimes, genocide and the rest it would make them all take notice. I think then the other governments of Africa would start to clean up their act a bit. I would hate to see anyone kill him then he would become a martyr. He needs to be tried in court so that the rest can see that it can happen to any of them.

I don't know whether it's because of the enormous increase in violence since the beginning of the year or what but I kind of sense something bigger is going to happen. Not sure what, if it's going to be better or worse. Most of them are grabbing the land more than anything, there has to be a good reason for this.  

As far as the number conflict in the reports, I would assume it has a lot to do with; where they obtain their information. Who's up to date and who's not. The only thing I can say is that we know they are high. I refrain from posting any more than I do, I pick and choose what to post. Other wise I could easily post more than a dozen a day.

They needed to turn the electric off for a few hours on day. I had more than 20 open documents on my computer waiting for me to format them; which had to be closed first. I save all relevant articles. So you see their is a lot going on. These opinions are just from what I read everyday.

Mazy
Achieving total Clooney-dom

Posts : 2883
Join date : 2012-11-03

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by mosaic on Mon Aug 12 2013, 20:15

mazy wrote: I don't know whether it's because of the enormous increase in violence since the beginning of the year or what but I kind of sense something bigger is going to happen
That's my sense, too, Mazy.  There is some reason for the increase in violence and land grabs and why the janjaweed is running amok.  Money is a big part of the reason, but I just don't think it is the whole reason.

And I would like to think that this is the darkness before dawn--that it will all work out in the end.

mosaic
Clooney Addict

Posts : 174
Join date : 2013-05-14

Back to top Go down

Re: The Economics of Ethnic Cleansing in Darfur

Post by Sponsored content Today at 13:16


Sponsored content


Back to top Go down

View previous topic View next topic Back to top


 
Permissions in this forum:
You cannot reply to topics in this forum