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The Monster of Florence

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The Monster of Florence

Post by Merlin on Wed Jan 05 2011, 07:28

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George Clooney to Star in Serial-Killer Film

LOS ANGELES (Hollywood Reporter) - George Clooney is attached to star in "The Monster of Florence," an adaptation of a best-selling nonfiction book about a serial killer who roamed the Italian city.

The project is set up at Fox 2000, where "Usual Suspects" scribe Christopher McQuarrie will adapt Douglas Preston and Mario Spezi's book. Clooney and business partner Grant Heslov will produce along with the "American Beauty" duo of Dan Jinks and Bruce Cohen.

At one point, Tom Cruise optioned the rights and set up the project at United Artists, which he was running at the time. Cruise brought McQuarrie aboard.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Merlin on Wed Jan 05 2011, 07:33

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Fox 2000 Acquires 'Monster Of Florence' With George Clooney Attached To Star

Fox 2000 has closed a deal that turns the bestselling crime book The Monster of Florence into a star vehicle for George Clooney. Christopher McQuarrie and Nathan Alexander are aboard to write the script. Dan Jinks and Bruce Cohen of the Jinks/Cohen Company will produce with Smokehouse's Grant Heslov, and McQuarrie.

Clooney will play Douglas Preston, who wrote the nonfiction bestseller The Monster of Florence with Italian crime reporter Mario Spezi. Preston is a thriller writer who met Spezi after moving to Italy. Together, they set out to solve a 30-year old serial murder case. Seven couples were savagely murdered between 1974 and 1985 while they sat in cars parked just outside Florence. The trail was cold when Preston moved into a nearby farmhouse and began asking questions. By that time, suspects had been let go, and authorities didn't welcome the curiosity of the writer. They threw Spezi in jail and interrogated Preston. Finally, the sleuths began putting the pieces into place and solved the murder.

The project was pitched to Fox 2000's Carla Hacken just before the holiday. She and president Elizabeth Gabler got excited enough to seal the deal just before Christmas. The producers had post-holiday meetings set around town, but they proved unnecessary and were canceled. For Clooney, this is another opportunity to make a movie in Italy, which has become his second home. Clooney is directing and starring in The Ides of March, and then joins Sandra Bullock in the Alfonso Cuaron-directed Gravity. CAA repped the book deal.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Guest on Wed Jan 05 2011, 07:46

I like the sound of this. And that it will be filmed in Italy. So who's directing?

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by it's me on Wed Jan 05 2011, 08:48

Italy?

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Dexterdidit on Wed Jan 05 2011, 10:45

I saw a crime show about this a few weeks ago very interesting story. I'm sure George would love to work in Italy again I wonder if eli will try out for a role?

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Merlin on Wed Jan 05 2011, 11:26

Horrible story but looking forward to seeing Florence my favourite city after Rome....

Caged...not known as yet....

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George Clooney Is Monster Of Florence
January 5, 2011 by Jez Sands

George Clooney is all set to return to Italy after his role in The American. He’ll play Douglas Preston who co-wrote the true crime novel Monster Of Florence with Italian crime writer Mario Spezi.
The story concerns Preston’s move to Italy where he became obsessed with a series of unsolved murders from 30 years ago. The trail had long gone cold and all the suspects released so the Italian police didn’t take kindly to him sticking his nose where it wasn’t wanted and even locked him and Spezi up. But this didn’t deter the amateur sleuths and they eventually solved the murders.
Christopher McQuarrie (writer of The Usual Suspects and more recently the screenplay for The Tourist) will be writing the script with Nathan Alexander. No director lined up for this one but the premise is certainly intriguing. Watch this space for more info.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Katiedot on Wed Jan 05 2011, 12:59

Whooee - this one sounds great! He's picking some really good films, isn't he? Although I can't help thinking that maybe there's a rumour in Hollywood that goes something like: "If you want George Clooney to star in your film, then set it in Italy in the summer. He'll do it for nothing!"

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by it's me on Wed Jan 05 2011, 13:03

tu dici? Smile

as
really?


Last edited by it's me on Wed Jan 05 2011, 13:18; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : adding smiley)

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Merlin on Wed Jan 05 2011, 13:37

Katiedot...Ha Ha and you can all stay at one of houses for free LOL

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Guest on Wed Jan 05 2011, 19:37

Thanks, Merlin. Definitely an interesting project. Be interesting to see who they get to direct.

Someone mailed this to me earlier- it's video background to the story and the police investigation -

It's in english, another 4 parts at the link - Monster of Florence P1

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by sisieq on Thu Jan 06 2011, 00:18

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The True Monster of Florence
Published: April 10, 2009 @ 1:18 pm
By Douglas Preston

Back in 2000, I moved to Italy with my family to write a murder mystery set in Florence. We rented a 14th century villa on a hill just outside the city, looking out over a lovely olive grove.

I never wrote the novel. Instead, I teamed up with Mario Spezi, the local newspaper reporter who had covered the Monster’s killings, and together we wrote a book about it, called “The Monster of Florence.”

The book was published last June. Movie rights to the story were picked up by United Artists, with Christopher McQuarrie, Tom Cruise and Jinks/Cohen producing. (See photo above, with -- from left -- Spezi, Cruise, McQuarrie and director Bryan Singer backstage at the Rome premiere of Singer’s “Valkyrie.”)

[Alot more at link - this is an old article]

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by sisieq on Thu Jan 06 2011, 00:21

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George Clooney has replaced Tom Cruise to portray novelist Douglas Preston in an upcoming movie about the search for the Monster of Florence serial killer, Cinemablend.com is reporting. While news of Cruise’s casting and screenwriter Christopher McQuarrie being hired to pen the script first surfaced in 2008, the latter still appears to be attached to the film.


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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by sisieq on Thu Jan 06 2011, 00:24

produce with Smokehouse's Grant Heslov,

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by bunny on Thu Jan 06 2011, 00:42

It seems George is attached to a lot of projects right now. I wonder how many of them really will be made.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by it's me on Thu Jan 06 2011, 00:50

me2

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by melbert on Thu Jan 06 2011, 02:54

Well, it definitely sounds like an interesting story. I like those kind of stories. However, he will need Eli to interpret for him, or "teach" him more Italian, eh? NOT!!!!

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Lighterside on Thu Jan 06 2011, 14:41

What a horrible story but a perfect vehicle for George. Really sounds interesting and I too wonder what's changed that lately his picks have been really interesting material. Can't wait for this new one to take off on Howard Dean's disasterous primary.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by lucy on Thu Jan 06 2011, 14:53

Good an evil character,I've been waiting for this since FDTD!

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Guest on Thu Jan 06 2011, 15:13

Lucy - I wish! But Clooney's not playing the serial-killer! He's the writer who teams up with the Italian crime journo to re-examine / investigate the killings. Clooney as serial killer would be awesome! I wonder could he play a serial killer? With the right hair, I think he could.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Dexterdidit on Thu Jan 06 2011, 23:27

It would be something differant for him but I'm not so sure he could pass as a real life inspired serial killer. In FDTD he was bad but compared to Quentin he was an angel.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by bunny on Thu Jan 06 2011, 23:51

I think George could play a truly evil serial killer, but I am not sure that this story is the right one.


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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Merlin on Thu Feb 24 2011, 07:08

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Michael Bay, Clooney Plan Films From Novels

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Last edited by Katiedot on Thu Feb 24 2011, 07:15; edited 1 time in total (Reason for editing : added the video)

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Katiedot on Sun Jun 12 2011, 19:23

Funny, we're not hearing anything more about this film, are we?

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Snoopy on Sun Jun 12 2011, 21:50

I was surfing around for information on this movie and Enron, couldn't find anything except the original story listed above.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by macs on Tue Oct 18 2011, 16:11

ok so he's talking here about many upcoming projects and not only MoF, so I wans't really sure where to put this, soI took the article's title
Hope that's ok, and that i didn't double post... otherwise just move/delete

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George Clooney Says Script For ‘Monster Of Florence’ Being Tweaked Due To Amanda Knox Verdict
Says He Won’t Direct Remake Of ‘Our Brand Is Crisis’

George Clooney is awash in Oscar buzz right now, for both “The Ides of March” (which he directed and stars in) and “The Descendants” (in which he stars). So is he excited? Not really. “I’ve been in and out of buzz so many times,” he says, “I’ve learned not to pay attention.”

In fact, Clooney seems very much focused on the future. “I’m looking for projects!” he told the Playlist at the New York Film Festival premiere of “The Descendants” on Sunday night. “We’ve been trying to figure out what we’re doing next.”

Well, let’s see. He’s already completed work on Alfonso Cuarón‘s sci-fi film with Sandra Bullock, “Gravity.” So what he’s really scouting for now is another directing project to add to his slate which includes 2002’s “Confessions of a Dangerous Mind,” 2005’s “Good Night and Good Luck,” and 2008’s “Leatherheads.” He was attached to direct the heist film “Belmont Boys” a few years ago (with a script by Brian Koppelman and David Levien), but has since moved on. “I’m off that,” he told us. “I’m done.”

Then there was the CIA thriller “Argo,” which Clooney co-wrote and was also planning to direct – until it became clear that his work on ‘Ides’ would have prevented him from starting the new film until next year. Fortunately, another actor-turned-director – Ben Affleck – turned up to take over. “Ben called me up,” Clooney recalled, “and said ‘I’m interested in directing it.’ So I said, ‘Well, that’s great.’ Ben’s a really, really good director, so I thought that was a great thing.” “Argo,” which is set in 1979 (and is now shooting), concerns a team of agents who pretend to be filmmakers in order to rescue some U.S. hostages in Iran. (Sounds odd, but it’s based on a true story.) “I’d like to see Ben’s take on it,” Clooney said. “Because while it’s a thriller, it’s got comedy in it, too, which is going to be fun for him. He’s got a great sense of humor.”

Then there’s the developing movie version of the 2005 political-marketing documentary “Our Brand Is Crisis.” Clooney was toying with the idea of directing that, too. But although he still intends to produce and star in the film, he has decided not to helm it. “It’s not something I really understand [as a director],” he admitted. “It’s sort of out there. It’s not quite in my range. So there are better directors for that.”

Also on the docket is “The Monster of Florence,” based on Douglas Preston’s true-crime book about an Italian serial killer. The movie has no director yet, but Clooney – who has a home in Italy – will definitely be playing Preston. However, the book features (and paints a very unflattering portrait of) the prosecutor in the case – the same one who recently presided over the Amanda Knox trial. And since Knox’s guilty verdict was just reversed on appeal, the ‘Monster’ script is currently being adjusted.

“I was very happy for that verdict,” Clooney says. “Because I was one of those people who thought Amanda Knox was probably guilty, and then I ended up changing my mind. And it will affect our screenplay, that verdict—and that mentality: get a conviction at all costs—because it’s the theme of the book and the screenplay.”

And Clooney definitely won’t be directing the picture, he said, because he only takes supporting roles in films he directs saying, “When you’re directing, you’re really doing everything—you’re really busy!” Which sounds like he might be up for a little real-life downtime. If there are no acting or directing projects for a while, he said, no problem. “I’m fine. I’ve got stuff to do.”

“The Descendants” hits theaters on November 18th.
[Photo via CelebBuzz]

Jen Vineyard posted to Actors, George Clooney, Films, The Monster Of Florence at 10:05 am on October 18, 2011 | Permalink | Comments (0)
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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Katiedot on Thu Mar 29 2012, 09:25

Not sure if this project is still going ahead although if George is talking about filming in Europe in the summer then it might well be.

Here's a bit more about the story:

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By Douglas Preston

My wife and I had always dreamed of living in Italy. Six years ago we finally made the move with our two young children. We rented a fourteenth-century farmhouse surrounded by olive groves and vineyards in the enchanting hills south of Florence. There were two famous landmarks near us: the villa La Sfacciata, once the home of Amerigo Vespucci, the Florentine explorer who gave America its name; and the villa I Collazzi, said to have been designed by Michelangelo, where Prince Charles painted many of his watercolors of the Tuscan landscape.

The olive grove beyond our front door boasted a third landmark, of sorts. It had been the site of one of the most horrific murders in Italian history, one of a string of double homicides committed by a serial killer known as “the Monster of Florence.” As an author of murder mysteries, I was more curious than dismayed. I began researching the case. It didn’t take me long to realize I’d stumbled across one of the most harrowing and remarkable stories in the annals of crime.

I contrived to introduce myself to the journalist who was the acknowledged expert on the case, a former crime correspondent for La Nazione named Mario Spezi. We met in Caffè Ricchi, in Piazza Santo Spirito, overlooking Brunelleschi’s last and greatest church. Spezi was a journalist of the old school, with a handsome if cadaverous face, salt-and-pepper hair, and a Gauloise hanging from his lip. He wore a Bogart fedora and trench coat, and, knocking back one espresso after another, he told me the full story. As he spoke, he had his pocket notebook open on the table and he sketched his thoughts—I later learned it was a habit of his—the pencil cutting and darting across the paper, making arrows and circles and boxes and dotted lines, illustrating the intricate connections among the killings, the arrests, the suspects, the trials, and the many failed lines of investigation.

Between 1974 and 1985, seven couples—fourteen people in all—were murdered while making love in parked cars in the hills of Florence. The case was never solved, and it has become one of the longest and most expensive criminal investigations in Italian history. More than 100,000 men have been investigated and more than a dozen arrested, and scores of lives have been ruined by rumor and false accusations. There have been suicides, exhumations, poisonings, body parts sent by post, séances in graveyards, lawsuits, and prosecutorial vendettas. The investigation has been like a malignancy, spreading backward in time and outward in space, metastasizing to different cities and swelling into new investigations, with new judges, police, and prosecutors, more suspects, more arrests, and many more lives ruined.

It was an extraordinary story, and I would—to my sorrow—come to share Spezi’s obsession with it. We became friends after that first meeting, and in the fall of 2000 we set off to find the truth. We believed we had identified the real killer. We interviewed him. But along the way we offended the wrong people, and our investigation took an unexpected turn. Spezi has just emerged from three weeks in prison, accused of complicity in the Monster of Florence killings. I have been accused of obstruction of justice, planting evidence, and being an accessory to murder. I can never return to Italy.

It all began one summer morning many years ago in the Florentine hills. The date was June 7, 1981, a Sunday. Mario Spezi, then thirty-five, was covering the crime desk at La Nazione, Florence’s leading paper, when a call came in: a young couple had been found dead in a quiet lane in the hills south of town. Spezi, who lived in those same hills, hopped into his Citroën and drove like hell along back roads, arriving before the police.

He will never forget what he saw. The Tuscan countryside, dotted with olive groves and vineyards, lay under a sky of cobalt blue. A medieval castle, framed by cypress trees, crowned a nearby rise. The boy seemed to be sleeping in the driver’s seat, his head leaning on the window. Only a little black mark on his temple, and the car window shattered by a bullet, indicated that it was a crime scene. The girl’s body lay some feet behind the car, at the foot of a little embankment, amid scattered wildflowers. She had also been shot and was on her back, naked except for a gold chain, which had fallen between her lips. Her vagina had been removed with a knife.

“What shook me most of all,” Spezi told me, “was the coldness of the scene. I’d seen many murder scenes before, and this wasn’t like any of them.” Everything was unnaturally composed, immobile, with no signs of struggle or confusion. It looked, he said, like a museum diorama.

Due to the sexual nature of the crime, it was assumed that the killer was a man. And yet the medical examiner’s report noted that the killer had not sexually assaulted the woman. On the contrary, he had assiduously avoided touching her body, except to perform a mutilation so expert that the medical examiner speculated he might be a surgeon—or a butcher. The report also noted that the killer had used a peculiar knife with a special notch in it, probably a scuba knife.

Spezi’s article caused a sensation: it revealed that a serial killer was stalking the countryside of Florence. In a sidebar, next to the article, La Nazione pointed to something the police had overlooked: this killing was similar to a double homicide that had taken place in the hills north of Florence in 1974. The article prompted the police to compare the shells recovered from both crimes. They discovered that the bullets had been fired by the same gun, a .22-caliber Beretta “long barrel” firing Winchester series “H” copper-jacketed rounds, which, according to ballistics experts, probably came from the same box of fifty. The gun had a defective firing pin that left an unmistakable mark on the rim of each shell.

The investigation that followed lifted the lid off a bizarre underworld, which few Florentines realized existed in the beautiful hills surrounding their city. Because most Italians live with their parents until they marry, sex in cars is a national pastime. At night, dozens of voyeurs prowled the hills spying on people making love in parked cars. Locally, these voyeurs were called “Indiani,” or Indians, because they crept around in the dark, some loaded down with sophisticated electronic equipment like suction-cup microphones and night-vision cameras. Following a quick investigation, the police arrested and jailed one of these Indiani.

A few months later the killer struck again, on a Saturday night with no moon, this time north of Florence, using the same Beretta and performing the same mutilation. This third double homicide panicked Florence and garnered front-page headlines across Italy.

Spezi worked nonstop for a month, filing fifty-seven articles. The excellent contacts he had developed among the police and the Carabinieri ensured he had the breaking news first. The circulation of La Nazione skyrocketed to the highest point in its history. Spezi wrote about one suspect, a priest, who frequented prostitutes for the thrill of shaving their pubic hair. He wrote about a psychic who spent a night in the cemetery where a victim was buried, sending and receiving messages from the dead. Spezi’s articles became famous for their dry turns of phrase and that one wicked little detail that remained with readers long after their morning espresso. Florentines have a flair for conspiracy thinking, and the citizenry indulged in wild speculation. Spezi’s articles were a counterpoint to the hysteria: understated and ironic in tone, they crushed one rumor after another and gently pointed the reader back to the actual evidence.

Late that November, Spezi received a journalistic prize for work he had done unrelated to the case. He was invited to Urbino to accept the prize, a kilo of the finest white Umbrian truffles. His editor allowed him to go only after he promised to file a story from Urbino. Not having anything new to write about, Spezi recounted the histories of some of the famous serial killers of the past, from Jack the Ripper to the Monster of Düsseldorf. He concluded by saying that Florence now had its very own serial killer—and there, amid the perfume of truffles, he gave the killer a name: “il Mostro di Firenze,” the Monster of Florence.

The austere savagery of the crimes preyed heavily on Spezi’s mind. He began to have nightmares and was fearful for his young and beautiful Flemish wife, Myriam, and for their baby daughter, Eleonora. The Spezis lived in a converted monastery on a hill high above the city, in the very heart of the Monster’s territory. What frightened Mario most of all, I think, was that coming in contact with such barbarity had forced him to confront the existence of a kernel of absolute evil within us all. The Monster, he once told me, was more like us than we might care to admit—it was a matter of degree, not kind.

Myriam urged her husband to seek help, and finally he agreed. Instead of going to a psychiatrist, Spezi, a devout Catholic, turned to a monk who ran a small mental-health practice out of his cell in a crumbling eleventh-century Franciscan monastery. Brother Galileo Babbini was short, with Coke-bottle glasses that magnified his piercing black eyes. He was always cold, even in summer, and wore a shabby down coat beneath his brown monk’s habit. He seemed to have stepped out of the Middle Ages, and yet he was a highly trained psychoanalyst with a doctorate from the University of Rome.

Brother Galileo combined psychoanalysis with mystical Christianity to counsel people recovering from devastating trauma. His methods were not gentle, and he was unyielding in his pursuit of truth. He had, Spezi told me, an almost supernatural insight into the dark side of the human soul. Spezi would see him throughout the case; he would confide to me that Brother Galileo had preserved not only his sanity, but also his life.

[continued on six more pages of this at the link]

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by melbert on Fri Mar 30 2012, 02:00

Thanks Katie!

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by silly girl on Mon Feb 18 2013, 02:44

Just saw this tweet:


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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Lakin460 on Mon Feb 18 2013, 02:56

good one, silly girl!

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Katiedot on Wed May 07 2014, 09:18

There's this from Les Frenchies

Looks like production on this is going ahead if they're location scouting alrady. Warning: the majority of this story is about a recent rape/murder case and may not be to everyone's liking.

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Dark side of Florence: George Clooney and the 'crucified' girl

Prosecutor who led Monster of Florence case – soon to be a Clooney film - has a new killer on his hands

COLUMN LAST UPDATED AT 08:23 ON WED 7 MAY 2014

FLORENCE – Does the Tuscan capital have a new 'monster' on its hands? A serial killer to rival the so-called Monster of Florence who struck 16 times between 1968 and 1985 and has never been caught? It looks like it - and the new killer's timing could hardly be more Hollywood-friendly.

Last week, the American screenwriter Chris McQuarrie was in town to scout locations for the shooting of The Monster of Florence, which George Clooney will produce and star in as the American writer Douglas Preston, on whose book the film is based.

Preston came to live in Tuscany in 2000 and discovered that a garden near his new home was the scene of one of the murders perpetrated by the 'monster', who always targeted couples making out in public places, shooting them with a Beretta pistol at close range, and invariably mutilating the genitals of the female victim.

Preston then took it upon himself to look into the killings but got caught up in what authorities say was a botched attempt to derail the investigation.

Back to the present – and according to Italian media, screenwriter McQuarrie was spotted carrying The Dark and Bloody Guide to Florence (with an introduction by Douglas Preston) under his arm. For authenticity, he should have come a week later.

This Monday, the body of a Romanian prostitute was discovered, naked but for her socks and tennis shoes, her arms duct-taped to a metal bar as if she had been crucified.

A man passing by on his bicycle found the dead girl on her knees, in woods close to a cemetery on Florence's northern periphery. "She was tied with her arms outstretched; her head was rolled over," he told the Corriere della Sera. "It looked like she was crucified."

First reports say Andrea Cristina Zamfir, 26, from Romania, was raped and killed after having performed sexual acts and after a long, desperate struggle to get loose that left her elbows bruised. Coroners estimate she died around midnight

The case is eerily similar to one a year ago when a 46-year-old Italian prostitute was attacked in a similar way in nearly the same location. She escaped, however, and is now working with investigators looking into the two killings and the disappearance of other working girls.

“Once again we are seeing the dark side of this city,” said Michele Giuttari, the bestselling Sicilian crimewriter and ex-cop who headed the homicide team that investigated the Monster of Florence murders.

Partly because of the killer's mutilation of sexual organs, Giuttari believed the 'monster' had links to freemasons and/or satanic sects – and he believes the new killer could be in the same mold.

"The whole world wants to visit enchanting Florence," Giuttari told me. “But the city has a dark soul, with secret sects, freemasonry and esoteric dark arts. And when that side occasionally reveals itself, we see crimes like this one – a woman killed and left hanging like a crucifix on a road called Cemetery Way.”

And here come the twists…

The investigation of a possible new serial killer is being coordinated by Paolo Canessa, the same prosecutor who worked on the Monster of Florence cases – still unsolved and still making legal reverberations today.

The Monster of Florence was co-written by Preston with an Italian journalist called Mario Spezi. The book took as its central premise a private theory of Spezi's that a Sardinian man, Antonio Vinci, was the monster and that Giuttari was wrong to be pursuing the "dark arts" line of inquiry.

Today, however, long after the book became a bestseller, inquiries have proved Vinci to have been innocent while Spezi stands accused of attempting to plant evidence to prove his baseless theory. The preliminary hearing is set for 25 June.

If followers of the Amanda Knox murder trials are thinking this is ringing bells, they are not mistaken: Preston and Spezi inserted themselves into that case too, going on television in the United States and Italy to push another baseless theory of a deranged prosecutor going after the wrong person.

But there’s a saying in Italy: Il tempo è galantuomo - time is a gentleman. Years later, the prosecutor’s charge of murder against Amanda Knox has held up on appeal and it is Spezi who is on trial for allegedly mucking up a murder investigation. ·

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Sevens on Wed May 07 2014, 09:28

Hope it's gonna be his next film!

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Nicky80 on Wed May 07 2014, 09:36

Sounds scary thrilling. 

London has "Jack the ripper" and Florence the monster LOL 

If they start now looking for locations....when do you think they will start? Next year?

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Katiedot on Wed May 07 2014, 09:39

I'm not sure. My impression is that location scouting normally happens a few months before filming starts, so that could put George at a summer/autumn film shoot in Italy. Sounds like a perfect honeymoon!

That's assuming George is still starring in this.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by party animal - not! on Wed May 07 2014, 09:46



So could this be what the house rumours were all about?

Have wondered when they were going to start on this. He has so many great projects........

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Sevens on Wed May 07 2014, 10:35

I think George's still starring in it. He won't be starring in any other projects for sure so why not this? It's shooting in Italy and he could feel at home.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Sevens on Wed May 07 2014, 10:36

But the big question is: who's the director for this?
Oops I think Christopher McQuarrie will be directing MI5...


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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Boshkash on Wed May 07 2014, 12:36

Thank God!! Out of all rumored projects, this one was in my top wish list!! Let's hope it is true..

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Alisonfan on Wed May 07 2014, 16:25

Katiedot wrote:I'm not sure.  My impression is that location scouting normally happens a few months before filming starts, so that could put George at a summer/autumn film shoot in Italy.  Sounds like a perfect honeymoon!

That's assuming George is still starring in this.


That's assuming there will be a wedding.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by LornaDoone on Wed May 07 2014, 21:37

OFF TOPIC FOR A SEC BUT GOING TO MAKE MY POINT:

Alisonfan - you can keep dreaming that this wedding isn't going to happen but George is the type of person that once he makes a commitment he follows through.  So let's hope not too many people are counting on that happening.  Would be a shame to be setting yourselves up for disappointment.

Now if something happens that she decides the media attention is not worth it - then that's on her.  But George is NOT going to back out now.

Back on topic.

This films looks interesting but seems like it could be pretty dark in tone given the subject manner.  I just hope they go with the older type of film making where they cutaway from any gory stuff (or better just show aftermath and even then please no CSI type stuff).

But a who-done-it with twists and turns where the audience is also involved in trying to find out who the killer is would be cool.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Nicky80 on Wed May 07 2014, 22:19

Maybe it will be something dark Like Johnny Depp in Sweeney Todd just not the singing LOL....

And hey I like all the CSI stuff....  Bounce

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by party animal - not! on Sun May 11 2014, 13:06

Horrific news story, but timely I suppose.

Looks like there might be a copycat............

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New Monster of Florence: After prostitute found ‘crucified’, memories of notorious serial killer are stirring in historic city

Florentines are being gripped by fears that the nightmare of “Il Mostro” - who was never caught - has returned

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Murder scene: Andrea (insert) was found tied to this barrier, arms outstretched

She had been stripped naked, raped and “crucified” with her arms outstretched and bound to a metal barrier.

Her body was covered in bruises from struggling to escape and she suffered appalling sexual torture.

But detectives in the Italian city of Florence still do not know exactly what killed Andrea Cristina Zamfir.

One theory, however, is that the 26-year-old mother-of-one died of fright, suffering a fatal heart attack through sheer terror at what the serial maniac – now linked to eight other sex attacks – was inflicting.

What is certain is that the Romanian prostitute knew, in those final moments, that she was in the hands of a monster.

And now the people of Florence are being gripped by new fears too – that the nightmare of “Il Mostro” has returned.

Between 1968 and 1985 a brutal serial killer murdered and mutilated 16 people – eight courting couples – at lovers’ lanes around the Tuscan capital.

He was dubbed Il Mostro – The Monster of Florence – and has never been caught. Four local men were charged and convicted at various times, but many believed they were mistakenly accused.

After shooting his victims at close range with a .22 Beretta pistol – often at the height of their sexual encounters – the killer would mutilate the women’s genitals and breasts, taking pieces of their bodies as trophies.

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Victims: Steffani Pettini and Pasquale Gentilcore

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Victims: Stefano Baldi and Susanna Campi

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Victims: Carmela Di Nuccio and Giovanni Foggi

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Victims: Antonella Migliorini and Paolo Maindardi

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Victims: Claudio Stefanacci and Pia Rontini

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Suspect: Giancarlo Lotti

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Suspect: Pietro Pacciani

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Suspect: Mario Vanni


American author Thomas Harris based his Silence of the Lambs character Hannibal Lecter on Il Mostro and in 1994 attended the trial of one of the suspects, an alcoholic farm labourer called Pietro Pacciani.

Pacciani was jailed for life but the conviction was overturned on appeal. He died, aged 71, in 1998 before his retrial.

The three others convicted of the killings were Stefano Mele, husband of the first female victim Barbara Locci, Mario Vanni, a retired postman and Pacciani’s alleged accomplice, and Giancarlo Lotti a vagrant said to belong to an occult group.

Last night it emerged that police have arrested a 55-year-old plumber in connection with the latest attacks – which they are not linking to the previous murders.

But locals with memories of the Monster recall that dozens of men were wrongly arrested for the original slayings, and the killer remains at large.

Six other prostitutes have been murdered in the Monster’s old killing fields in the past decade, and eight others sexually attacked – including a woman who survived a similar “crucifixion” last year.

And now the same prosecutor who led the Monster investigation, Paolo Canessa, has been assigned to hunt for the crucifixion killer.

It has, inevitably, prompted comparisons and resurrected old conspiracy theories about the Il Mostro murders – satanic pacts, black magic, graveyard seances and Freemasonry.

For Hollywood, the atrocities are something of a PR coup. Last week, top screenwriter Chris McQuarrie flew to Tuscany to scout for locations for pal George Clooney’s new film – The Monster of Florence – based on a book about the killings written by American writer Doug Preston and Italian journalist Mario Spezi.

For the Florentines however, who spent two decades in fear of Il Mostro, Andrea’s murder has brought back grim memories.

Andrea was murdered on Sunday night underneath a motorway flyover in Florence’s North West suburb Ungano – on a track known chillingly as Cemetery Way.

She was naked apart from her socks and trainers, her arms were bound to the barrier with surgical tape and she had been brutally raped. Her clothes, bag and purse were discovered half a mile away.

Andrea was found by a cyclist who told reporters: “She was tied with her arms outstretched and her head was rolled over. Her legs were free. She was on her knees, covered in bruises and quite clearly dead.

“It looked like she was crucified.”

In March last year, a 46-year-old Italian prostitute was found in the same spot, “crucified” but still alive. Locals heard her screams but the attacker managed to run away. She had been raped and suffered such serious internal injuries she spent three weeks in hospital.

The woman told police she was attacked by a client – a stocky, balding man in his mid-50s with a white car and a Florence accent.

She said later: “He made me strip naked then tied me to a plank of wood with surgical tape. He tortured me and raped me. I thought he was going to kill me.”

Locals claim four women, mostly prostitutes, have been attacked in recent years, but preferred not to report the violence to police. And sex attack victims in the nearby city of Prato described the culprit as aged 50-60, stocky and balding.

Police are making house to house inquiries and examining cigarette butts and bottles found near Andrea’s body for DNA.

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Scene: Police officers hold up sheeting to shield the girl’s body

Lorenzo Bucossi, of the Florence Flying Squad, said: “There are similarities between this case and at least eight others but this one was particularly tragic as the victim died as a result of the attack.

“There was no obvious cause of death but there were severe bruises on her body and also around her wrists where she clearly struggled frantically to escape. It’s possible she suffered some form of fatal attack during or after she was bound.

“We don’t think there is anything symbolic about how the attacks. The most important thing is to catch him before he strikes again.”

But those who remember the ritualistic brutality of Il Mostro believe the crucifixion element could spark a similar climate of fear.

Il Mostro first struck in 1968, when he killed Antonio Lo Bianco, 29, and his married lover Barbara Locci, 32, in Signa, a small town to the west of Florence. Locci’s son Natalino Mele, six, was asleep in the back seat of the car at the time.

In 1974, Pasquale Gentilcore, 19, and Stefania Pettini, 18, were shot and stabbed in a country lane while having sex in a Fiat.

In 1981, Giovanni Foggi, a 30-year-old warehouseman and shop assistant fiancee Carmela Di Nuccio, 21, were murdered near Scandicci.

The next victims were Stefano Baldi, 26, and his fiancee Susanna Cambi, a 24-year-old telephonist who were killed in a park later that year. In 1982, the Monster targeted bride-to-be Antonella Migliorini, a 20-year-old dressmaker, and mechanic Paolo Mainardi, 22, on a country road.

In 1984, he killed sweethearts Claudio Stefanacci, 21, and Pia Gilda Rontini, 18, in woodland. Finally, in 1985, holiday makers Jean Michel Kraveichvili, 25, and Nadine Mauriot, 36, were murdered in woods.

When no one reported the pair missing, Il Mostro sent a piece of Nadine’s breast to state prosecutor Silvia della Monica with a note challenging her to find their bodies.

Police in the Anti Monster Squad were convinced he was involved in satanic sects and black magic.

One of those was Michele Giuttari, who is now retired and a best-selling crime writer. Following Andrea’s murder he said: “Once again we are seeing the dark side of this city.

“The whole world wants to visit enchanting Florence but the city has a dark soul, with secret sects, Freemasonry and esoteric dark arts.

“And when that side occasionally reveals itself, we see crimes like this one – a woman killed and left hanging like a crucifix on a road called Cemetery Way.”


Last edited by Nicky80 on Sun May 11 2014, 14:52; edited 2 times in total (Reason for editing : added text and pics)

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by LizzyNY on Sun May 11 2014, 13:46

Horrible story. It does make it sound like the film is moving forward, though. I wonder if George is starring or producing. If they're scouting locations it may not be too long before they start production.

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Re: The Monster of Florence

Post by Boshkash on Sun May 11 2014, 14:13

I hope that he will act on it, he never did a similar movie..

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Re: The Monster of Florence

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